Main definitions of squash in English

: squash1squash2

squash1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Crush or squeeze (something) with force so that it becomes flat, soft, or out of shape.

    ‘wash and squash the cans before depositing them’
    ‘a squashed packet of cigarettes’
    • ‘Although the pressures used are immense, the processing conditions are designed so that foods are not squashed and they do retain their shape.’
    • ‘‘The car was completely crushed from the front, my door was squashed in and the rest of the car was folded around me,’ said Gemma.’
    • ‘You are requested to wash and squash containers before putting them in the recycling bins.’
    • ‘And anyone who has been through Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Charley, you know that it literally just squashes these sorts of homes.’
    • ‘We now have fresh bread every breakfast, and it is not squashed flat in the shopping trolley.’
    • ‘I shrugged, dropping my half burned cigarette to the ground, squashing it beneath my foot.’
    • ‘Halve the lemon grass stalks and squash the bases with the flat side of a knife.’
    • ‘The company have asked that cartons, cans and plastic containers be rinsed, dried and squashed.’
    • ‘As one insect is squashed, another takes his place.’
    • ‘I've been squashing the flies as I see them but now I can put up sticky traps and let them catch themselves.’
    • ‘I of course could not sleep for fear of rolling over and squashing her.’
    • ‘It feels like someone's sitting on your chest and squashing it, and you can't usually speak either, which doesn't help if you're trying to get help.’
    • ‘I recycle as much of my household waste as possible, kitchen waste is composted, cans are squashed flat after removing bases, drink cans, newspapers and all other clean wastepaper placed in the relevant bins.’
    • ‘Like other kids, when I was small we used to try to make wine, squashing grapes in a bucket.’
    • ‘I am also a vegetarian and attempt to relocate spiders rather than squashing them flat.’
    • ‘Meyers also is analyzing the strong, but extremely lightweight bill of the Toco Toucan, a Central and South American bird that squashes fruit and berries with its banana-shaped bill.’
    • ‘He flung the cigarette to the ground and squashed it slowly with the toe of his right shoe.’
    • ‘She considers squashing the insect between her fingers, but decides not to.’
    • ‘His face was redder than the tomatoes he was squashing under foot and spittle flew from his mouth as he lumbered toward his wife.’
    • ‘He stepped on the cigarette, squashing it into the ground.’
    crush, squeeze, flatten, compress, press, smash, distort, mangle, pound, tamp down, stamp on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object and adverbial]Squeeze or force into a small or restricted space.
      ‘she squashed some of her clothes inside the bag’
      • ‘DVT class is bad, and arguably, the airlines have a lot to answer for, having the cheek to squash us in to such a restricted space.’
      • ‘If one partner is particularly tall, she says, they may often end up sleeping diagonally - leaving the smaller partner squashed into a corner of the bed.’
      • ‘I really, really enjoy being squashed up against your plump, sweaty body as part of a concept we English call ‘queueing’.’
      • ‘As you know, airline seats occur in close proximity to each other in order to squash the greatest number of passengers into a small space.’
      • ‘We were squashed on the couch, so the sides of our legs touched.’
      • ‘Shadwell is an overlooked part of London's East End, squashed in between Whitechapel and Wapping.’
      • ‘The group appeared on GMTV together and while squashed on a sofa the girls said they were ‘shocked’ at the boys' antics.’
      • ‘Even choosing something to try on is hard because the gowns are normally stored in plastic covers and squashed into racks.’
      • ‘The second pub was ridiculously busy, so we were squashed in a corner with a drunken group of men watching the football next to us.’
      • ‘‘Night!’ the children chorused, snuggling down on the thin straw, squashed together like sardines in a tin.’
      • ‘From there it was a further eight hours or so bumping along on the back of a truck, under a full moon, squashed up with other passengers balancing on sacks of rice.’
      • ‘Danielle's old pushchair is too small and her legs are all squashed up in it.’
      • ‘Maureen's wheelchair takes up most of the space in the elevator, leaving me squashed against Clay.’
      • ‘‘We were squashed in like sardines, and it was hot as hell in there,’ he recalls.’
      • ‘I had to fly in four different planes for 30 hours almost non-stop, squashed in economy class, the trip ending in Slovakia under the tight scrutiny of heavily armed troops.’
      • ‘Somehow, the cast had managed to take over the bar, commandeering almost every chair in the place as they crowded around a group of tables squashed together.’
      • ‘It's weird to think that at any time, somewhere in the world, there are people riding through the night in aeroplanes, squashed up together in a big metal tube hurtling across the black sky, going somewhere or coming back home.’
      • ‘We were so squashed we were just living in one room.’
      • ‘Trinity was becoming claustrophobic as she was squashed between the two boys.’
      • ‘But on Christmas Eve we're like cattle at a mart, squashed up against each other, fighting for the bar and talking absolute rubbish.’
    2. 1.2[no object, with adverbial of direction]Make one's way into a small or restricted space.
      ‘I squashed into the middle of the crowd’
      • ‘The little shelf was narrow and you had to squash in between others to get your cup of hot, strong sweet tea!’
      • ‘Apart from the lack of jobs, we are already over-populated and do not need to provide facilities to encourage even more people to squash into our valuable space.’
      • ‘They remembered what had happened the last time they tried to squash through the door together.’
      • ‘As they began their long journey back to Ballina, the ten St Mary's girls squashed into the back seat of the bus to recall the events of their weekend together.’
      • ‘Five of us squashed rapidly into a two man tent and despite the odds slept until daybreak.’
      • ‘‘They would squash up in the car, so I could lie on the back seat,’ he says.’
  • 2Suppress or subdue (a feeling or action)

    ‘the mournful sound did nothing to squash her high spirits’
    • ‘This squashes other export industries and sucks in cheap imports, damaging others.’
    • ‘The feelings, however, had to be squashed immediately and that's exactly what he did.’
    • ‘I didn't really understand how it was squashing my spirit until I was a little older.’
    • ‘Khalid, understandably enough, was of the opinion that rebellion could not be squashed.’
    • ‘Many observers worry that such mergers could squash what few competing voices there are in many towns and cities.’
    • ‘When she sends Guy off to war at the end of the first act, she projects so much youthful innocence and idealism that there's no way her happiness isn't going to be squashed by circumstance.’
    • ‘Brass insists doubts over City's character and commitment can be firmly squashed in the wake of Saturday's 2-0 victory over Cambridge United.’
    • ‘The bubbly romantic feelings Delaney was having were quickly squashed as she pulled out her palm pilot again and stared at Tanya's name.’
    • ‘She quickly squashed the small pang of jealousy that had risen up in her.’
    • ‘She winked and a picture of Shawn flashed through my mind, which I squashed down immediately.’
    • ‘Maya's excitement over their dinner guest wouldn't be squashed.’
    • ‘Hope and relief filled me, but were almost immediately squashed as someone kicked me in the ribs, and I found my face pressed against the floor.’
    • ‘Any uprising is squashed by a massive show of force, as seen in the 1959 and more recently, the 1987-1989 uprisings.’
    • ‘Patriotism rallied the nation and previously popular anti-war sentiments were effectively squashed.’
    1. 2.1Firmly reject (an idea or suggestion)
      ‘the proposal was immediately squashed by the Heritage Department’
      • ‘Thankfully, that proposal has now been squashed, and the hard-working New Zealander who always foots the bill will not be subject to that tax, at least.’
      • ‘They forget, or do not wish to acknowledge, that in a packed meeting of party delegates after the May election there was comment, criticism and suggestions as to party policy, none of which were squashed.’
      • ‘In June last year, Thompson was forced to squash rumours the club had received a £1million offer from premiership Sheffield Wednesday for the midfield tyro.’
      • ‘Council officials moved swiftly to squash rumours of scores of asylum seekers moving to Canvey.’
      • ‘I hope that the whole idea will be squashed at this early stage, but if it goes further I will fight to keep our right to regional labelling.’
      • ‘I've heard some talk about that, but I hope I squashed the rumours adequately.’
      • ‘Many an enthusiastic proposal has been squashed by an economist with a calculator and too much time on his hands.’
      • ‘I squashed the idea as soon as it crossed my mind.’
      • ‘His mother had immediately squashed that idea.’
      • ‘Port Street is a litter of unrelated architecture and closed businesses and again proposals to inject new life are being squashed.’
      • ‘One benefit of the committee is that since ideas become public immediately, an individual idea can't be squashed by only one manager.’
    2. 2.2Silence or discomfit (someone), typically by making a humiliating remark.
      ‘she needled him with such venom that Seb was visibly squashed’
      • ‘She needled him with such venom from behind her thick lenses that Seb was visibly squashed.’
      • ‘As soon as someone tries to squash me into a position of submission I will react and deal with any consequences later.’
      • ‘She deserves to be squashed like everyone's squashed me.’

noun

  • 1[in singular] A state of being squeezed or forced into a small or restricted space.

    ‘it was a bit of a squash but he didn't seem to mind’
    • ‘Saturday morning all six of the Tate family piled into the car - it was a tight squash in the back seat.’
    • ‘It was a bit of a squash because it was a small car and three of us were in the back with Gabby's Mum, Cam and Dad, Tom in the front.’
    • ‘MK drove us all to Bar George (which was a bit of a squash with an extra bod in the car).’
    1. 1.1dated [count noun]A social gathering or informal meeting.
      ‘a poetry squash in London’
      • ‘In 1912, Conrad Aiken took ‘Prufrock’ to a poetry squash in London and showed it to Harold Monro.’
      • ‘1977 You know that next week is the Freshers' Squash.’
  • 2British [mass noun] A sweet concentrated liquid made from or flavoured with fruit juice, which is diluted to make a drink.

    ‘orange squash’
    • ‘Stay away from fizzy drinks, alcohol, and even squash as these drinks help to dehydrate you.’
    • ‘Fruit squash, even the high-fruit variety, is no substitute for fresh fruit juice.’
    • ‘The youngsters, aged between seven and 17, tucked into complimentary homemade scones, fruitcake and orange squash.’
    • ‘To protect your child's teeth against decay and erosion, try to keep squashes, fizzy drinks, natural fruit juices, sweets and cakes to a minimum.’
    • ‘It's much kinder to their teeth than juice or squash and fizzy drinks.’
  • 3[mass noun] A game in which two players use rackets to hit a small, soft rubber ball against the walls of a closed court.

    [as modifier] ‘a squash club’
    • ‘Born and brought up in Sydney, Australia, he took up squash at the age of nine.’
    • ‘Played squash three times this week so I'm well tired today too.’
    • ‘Jhangir Khan did not lose a squash match for five and a half years, winning 10 British Open titles.’
    • ‘Moore kept up a vigorous training programme in retirement, jogging every day and playing golf, tennis and squash regularly.’
    • ‘Many of the best professional squash players living in America will be in attendance.’
  • 4Biology
    A preparation of softened tissue that has been made thin for microscopic examination by gently compressing or tapping it.

    • ‘Polytene chromosome squashes, cuticle preps, maternal enhancement, and stage of lethality tests were performed as described.’
    • ‘For immunolabeling, third instar mitotic squashes were prepared and hybridized as described.’
    • ‘This SC karyotype is very similar to karyotypes developed from pachytene chromosome squashes.’
    • ‘Polytene chromosome squashes were prepared according to SILVER and ELGIN 1978.’
    • ‘Pachytene chromosomes were prepared using squashes of anthers from flowers fixed in 3: 1 ethanol to galacial acetic acid.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (as a verb): alteration of quash.

Pronunciation:

squash

/skwɒʃ/

Main definitions of squash in English

: squash1squash2

squash2

noun

  • 1An edible gourd, the flesh of which may be cooked and eaten as a vegetable.

    • ‘Many parents were unsure of how to prepare some of the fresh vegetables, such as eggplant and some squashes.’
    • ‘The best vegetables are coming into season, I love sprouts, parsnips, swede, squash and pumpkins.’
    • ‘Peel the squash then cut the flesh into chunks.’
    • ‘The staple of Mexican food is corn, supplemented by beans, squash, and chili peppers.’
    • ‘There's much more beta carotene in traditional crops, from leafy green vegetables to squashes, melons and mangoes.’
  • 2The trailing plant of the gourd family which produces the squash.

    • ‘Plant sweet corn in each of the first three weeks of June for multiple crops, and plant squash and cantaloupes up to June 20.’
    • ‘They planted a wide variety of beans, pumpkins, squash, and corn.’
    • ‘Once soil temperatures reach 60 degrees, you can plant corn, beans, squash and cucumbers.’
    • ‘The peas and other vines won't bother each other so go ahead and plan on planting cucumbers, melons or even squash together on the same trellis.’
    • ‘Both powdery mildew and downy mildew often infect squash plants as autumn nights grow cooler and dew keeps the foliage moist through the night.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: abbreviation of Narragansett asquutasquash.

Pronunciation:

squash

/skwɒʃ/