Definition of sprightly in English:

sprightly

(also spritely)

adjective

  • (especially of an old person) lively; full of energy.

    ‘she was quite sprightly for her age’
    • ‘A sprightly woman wrings her hands as if flirtatiously sizing up a fellow resident at the nursing home.’
    • ‘Brian followed and greeted Michelle quietly while smiling at his spritely sister.’
    • ‘He is at ease with his age - a sprightly 64.’
    • ‘Felicity, ‘a spunky, spritely girl growing up in Virginia in 1774,’ visits a local plantation where there are clearly slaves; the issue never arises.’
    • ‘She was small and spritely with light hair and laughing hazel eyes, in contrast to Agathe who was tall, dark and solemn, although very graceful and beautiful.’
    • ‘‘We say that the day you don't think about falling, you will fall,’ says Corinne Pierre, a sprightly French-Canadian acrobat.’
    • ‘He looked as lively and sprightly as ever despite now being in his mid forties.’
    • ‘This is not about becoming spritely, so much as a little celestial.’
    • ‘There was an amusing final theatrical flourish from the Conservative candidate, John Taylor, a sprightly 63-year-old.’
    • ‘The spritely 27-year-old was swept in as a last-minute understudy for the part when Clairemarie Osta came down with double tendinitis.’
    • ‘Sergio Martino is spritely and lively in his discussion of this early project.’
    • ‘When Lucy, a sprightly waitress with a song on her lips and in her heart, meets Adam, she gives up her ‘man-izing’ ways and wants to settle down.’
    • ‘His lover, Mercedes, is a sprightly dancer who would have benefited from a brighter costume.’
    • ‘Tom seems very well, spritely I think the word is.’
    lively, spry, energetic, active, full of life, full of energy, vigorous, spirited, animated, vivacious, playful, jaunty, perky, frisky, agile, nimble
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from spright (rare variant of sprite) + -ly.

Pronunciation

sprightly

/ˈsprʌɪtli/