Definition of spotter in English:

spotter

noun

British
  • 1[often in combination] A person who looks for or observes a particular thing as a hobby or job:

    ‘plane-spotters’
    • ‘Sensing a major blow to his members' pursuits, Seex wrote to the Metropolitan Police with an idea: Rather than outlaw plane spotters, why not enlist them in the war against terrorism?’
    • ‘I worked as a spotter for two years under Aliz.’
    • ‘A year later, Swoff is enrolled in sniper training along with his spotter, Troy, who would become his closest friend.’
    • ‘It's at this point that real markets begin to form, nurtured by Cool Hunters and other for-hire trend spotters and culture vultures.’
    • ‘And as Chief Superindentent Savill of the Metropolitan Police tells us, ‘groups’ that could help in similar ways have been targeted, so it's not just the plane spotters.’
    • ‘Weather net control operators and spotters, he says, are better informed thanks to the Web.’
    • ‘Not only were weapons used by soldiers on Bloody Sunday destroyed, but photographs taken by army spotters have also gone missing.’
    • ‘Other players key to winning, such as offensive linemen, can't be sorted by jersey numbers because the league's spotters are required to follow the action, not take attendance.’
    • ‘The television broadcast of the race included live coverage of communications between Jarrett's crew chief and spotter, and of that spotter consulting with other spotters.’
    • ‘Coffey attended the Naval Academy and became a spotter on the P - 3C Orion plane, a submarine chaser that hunted Soviet vessels in the Atlantic.’
    • ‘Cool hunters are more than just streetwise fad spotters.’
    • ‘Over 6,000 policemen and women were on the streets of central London backed up by mounted police, three police helicopters and numerous plainclothes spotters on the roofs and in the crowd.’
    • ‘The latter group is made up of those whining whale lovers, owl spotters and tree huggers who try to prevent trawlers, loggers, miners and oildrillers from making an honest living looting our planet's finite resources.’
    1. 1.1 An aviator or aircraft employed in locating or observing enemy positions:
      [as modifier] ‘spotter planes’
      • ‘Sequences are shown featuring artillery attack on enemy positions directed by a circling spotter plane.’
    2. 1.2North American A person who observes weather patterns on behalf of an organization:
      ‘the National Weather Service said a spotter had called in to report a tornado touching the ground near Somonauk’
    3. 1.3 (in gymnastics, weight training, etc.) a person stationed to observe the performer and minimize the risk of accidents or injuries.
      • ‘We had spotters when we played on the rock-climbing wall and we practiced falling off stilts in a way that would lessen the impact on our bodies.’
    4. 1.4 A member of a motor racing team who sits above the track and communicates with the driver by radio about what is happening along the course:
      ‘spotters had to be positioned above the grandstands during practices’
    5. 1.5US informal A person employed by a company or business to keep watch on employees or customers.

Pronunciation:

spotter

/ˈspɒtə/