Definition of spit blood in English:

spit blood

phrase

informal
  • Be very angry.

    • ‘If I was Chris Haywood, I would be spitting chips after watching this.’
    • ‘Last week I was spitting blood at AA Gill, this week I'm applauding him.’
    • ‘‘I was spitting blood when I saw the original,’ he said.’
    • ‘We also rang New Idea to see if they were spitting chips over the steal, but they didn't get back to us.’
    • ‘But leaders in Poland, Hungary and Slovakia are spitting blood because the failure of the budget threatens vital projects in their countries.’
    • ‘‘To be honest, I am spitting blood about this,’ she said.’
    • ‘All but one were employed in three popular seafood restaurants owned by the Doyle family, and the Doyles today are spitting chips.’
    • ‘Casino executives were spitting blood after the latest revision of a policy that has shifted in just a matter of weeks from a sensible liberalisation to something restrictive - unfair and worse than the current rules.’
    • ‘This morning Nathan Buckley was on the radio spitting chips about by this article from Chip Le Grand.’
    • ‘Yet the Ayrshire side were spitting blood that he did so by awarding the visitors a first half penalty that wasn't, while failing to spot they might have deserved one themselves in the second period.’
    • ‘One former adviser said: ‘John was spitting blood when he learned of it.’’
    • ‘Not only does Crest have a drug lord and an angry bunch of dealers after him - his girlfriend's also spitting chips.’
    • ‘Pledges to join the European Community and replace short prison sentences with fines would leave modern Tories spitting blood.’
    • ‘Eddington was spitting blood about it at the time, and the only surprise is that this had not taken place sooner.’
    • ‘Abou Jahjah, who emigrated to Belgium from Lebanon when he was 19 and fought against the Israelis, has had the Belgian establishment spitting blood before.’
    • ‘Sitting beside me at the Liberal launch, writer John Birmingham spat chips - he'd stayed home to look after the baby while his partner stayed working.’
    • ‘European governments are unhappy and most of the bank's staff are spitting blood.’