Main definitions of spire in English

: spire1spire2

spire1

noun

  • 1A tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, typically a church tower.

    • ‘The slender minaret of a mosque and the spires of churches rise in sharp relief over the flat roofs of the homes.’
    • ‘Initially in Norman style, it developed into a great Gothic cathedral with a towering spire, the largest church in England and third largest in Europe.’
    • ‘St Peter's church is prominently situated in the town of Drogheda, Co Louth and has a distinctive clock tower and spire.’
    • ‘Conical spires on top support pinnacles that enabled the towers to obtain the coveted height record.’
    • ‘He enjoyed a reputation for building tall elegant masonry structures such as church towers and spires.’
    • ‘New light has been shed on the cathedral spire and tower which, at 404 ft is the tallest masonry structure in Britain, by tree ring dating.’
    • ‘It runs along something of a ridge so we could see for miles to villages betrayed by church towers and spires.’
    • ‘The architecture attested to its ancient heritage, with massive castle-like structures adorned with spires and turrets on nearly every building.’
    • ‘A palace had spires and towers; this was one solid structure, a gigantic rectangle imposed on the landscape.’
    • ‘Towers, turrets, soaring church spires - the graceful architecture in Moscow and St. Petersburg is filmed in minute detail.’
    • ‘We could see a proliferation of white towers, minaret answering church spire.’
    • ‘It's a striking building with turrets and spires.’
    • ‘Much of the repair work centres on the spire of the church where water has been leaking into tower and rotting the foundations.’
    • ‘The tall buildings stretched high into the night sky, the top spires of the churches and court houses surrounded in a wreath of smoke from the fires that burned in pot bellied stoves far below.’
    • ‘Most of the infrastructure is completed, including the framework for the spire on the abbey tower.’
    • ‘One of the best shots in the film is of a church spire which pans up to reveal the minaret of the mosque just behind.’
    • ‘Gothic cathedrals are characterised by large towers and spires.’
    • ‘Ornate buildings, gracious parks, spires and steeples which jab like fingers into the sky - all these vie with each other in the downtown area.’
    • ‘Former as well as current places of worship with towers, spires, minarets or domes are also helpful navigational aids.’
    • ‘I was a massive stone structure with many great spires and turrets.’
    steeple, belfry
    flèche
    shikara
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The continuation of a tree trunk above the point where branching begins, especially in a tree of a tapering form.
      • ‘After clipping another bolt, I looked out to see nothing but blue sky with a few light, wispy clouds hovering way above the spires of Queen Creek Canyon.’
      • ‘The spires of the background forest continue this use of repetition.’
      • ‘How lovely and strange the gangly spires of trees against a thickening sky as you drive from the library humming off-key?’
    2. 1.2A long tapering object.
      ‘spires of delphiniums’
      • ‘I prefer the restrained vista-framing, avenue-forming, gentle shapes of cylinders, spires and cones.’
      • ‘The rest of the crater forms a rim of jagged peaks and spires, which give it a dinosaur skeleton-like profile.’
      • ‘Three marines, held their ground, and fired plasma round after plasma round at the spires above them.’
      • ‘Seres started to forge a chant and the flower was concealed within a spire of red light.’
      • ‘If these plants have spikes and spires, they also add vertical movement, drama and an airy lightness to the garden.’
      • ‘To assure a robust flower spire, feed plants in late winter or early spring with a balanced dry fertilizer or a top dressing of well-rotted manure or compost.’
      • ‘Jagged spires of rock rise high above the boiling surf, peaking ultimately in tree-covered summits.’
      • ‘The great tree is an ancient spire of dead wood, made of lignin and cellulose by the ancestors of the thin layer of living cells that go to constitute its bark.’
      • ‘The Towers themselves appear to have been built from east to west, with each successive spire rising taller and showing greater economy of form and construction methodology.’
      • ‘It looked like an abstract statue made from brown stone, roughly cylindrical, with small spires jutting out from the top, seemingly placed at random.’
      • ‘The spires behind the figure collapsed, as two spherical domes rose to the surface.’
      • ‘Now there were sharp ravines and barren gray slopes and narrow red spires looming above a clay basin that had, for 600 millennia, been eroded by rivers and wind.’
      • ‘Connected to the tips of each spire was a crescent moon.’
      • ‘The trees were skeletal spires of hardened white ash, and the ground was bare of greenery, instead coated with an oily black film.’
      • ‘These herbaceous biennials produce tall spires clustered with tiny flowers, each of which is surrounded by its own emerald bell.’
      • ‘By traipsing through them, we can map out the route to the golden spires and around the crocodile pits of this emerging sub-genre.’
      • ‘Is it simply the love of adventure that beckons them towards these pristine ice clad peaks and spires, at times crossing the barren icy wastelands to reach the zenith of tranquility and peace the mountains offer?’
      • ‘For the piece de résistance, set all within a naturalized sea of camassia bulbs with their tall greenish spires and soft blue florets that bloom for weeks on end in late spring.’
      • ‘They include a white or orchre-painted cone surmounted by a tapering spire and standing on a square pedestal.’
      • ‘Our guides lead us in yoga as dawn light dances on the redrock spires that form the backdrop of our camp.’

Origin

Old English spīr ‘tall slender stem of a plant’; related to German Spier tip of a blade of grass.

Pronunciation:

spire

/spʌɪə/

Main definitions of spire in English

: spire1spire2

spire2

noun

Zoology
  • The upper tapering part of the spiral shell of a gastropod mollusc, comprising all but the whorl containing the body.

    • ‘However, the upper spire whorls of P. calafia are shorter than the corresponding ones on P. acuminata.’
    • ‘When viewed from above, the shells appear to represent small piles of pebbles, with the smallest ones on the upper spire and the largest ones on the body whorl.’
    • ‘Inspection of the literature reveals that a number of fossil species of cerithiform gastropods have a high-pyramidal spire like that of Alamirifica.’
    • ‘The morphology of the upper spire of the Jamaican species is not known.’
    • ‘The animal crawled with the spire of the shell facing backwards, unlike pre-torted Bellerophontids.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the general sense ‘a spiral’): from French, or via Latin from Greek speira a coil.

Pronunciation:

spire

/spʌɪə/