Definition of spasm in English:

spasm

noun

  • 1A sudden involuntary muscular contraction or convulsive movement.

    ‘shifting heavy loads without help brought on muscular back spasms’
    • ‘The main symptom of a slipped disc is sudden, excruciating back pain with severe back muscle spasm.’
    • ‘The ride home was fairly uneventful, except when Nick started having a sneezing spasm, and mom totally freaked out.’
    • ‘Her body jerked once and rigid spasms shook her.’
    • ‘Muscle cramping is a painful, involuntary muscle spasm that regularly frustrates athletes.’
    • ‘He was shuddering uncontrollably and his body was racked with spasms.’
    • ‘Frank's hands jerked in a spasm, his palms sweaty in the enclosure of his shirt.’
    • ‘The slightest movement would send it into spasms.’
    • ‘She has occasional painful muscle spasms in her chest - but her consultant is confident everything is settling down well.’
    • ‘She was curled into a foetal position, her body jerking as fresh spasms of pain hit her.’
    • ‘Isaac's body jerked, gave a few spasms, twitched a couple times, and got up off the floor.’
    • ‘Her body convulsed into spasms and the twitching got worse as the situation got worse.’
    • ‘I was stunned by the sudden pain spasms that quaked straight through my spinal cord and nerves.’
    • ‘The spasms had subsided into shivering that came and went with some regularity.’
    • ‘When I released her, her body convulsed with spasms of pain.’
    • ‘So much tension brought on spasms of stomach cramps.’
    • ‘The reasons were unknown, but onlookers seem to agree it looked like convulsions or spasms.’
    • ‘The most severe cases involve intense spasms in which the muscles contract to protect the joint.’
    • ‘Nitrates have also been shown to relieve coronary spasm.’
    • ‘He twitched on the ground, spasms running through his body.’
    • ‘It seemed he was having violent spasms and convulsing.’
    convulsion, contraction, throes, cramp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sudden and brief spell of an activity or sensation.
      ‘a spasm of coughing woke him’
      • ‘The Pritzkers can only hope that all their current troubles will be fleeting, a brief spasm rather than the beginning of a decline in their fortunes.’
      • ‘Swanson's hit-and-miss lyrics, combined with the spasms and outbursts of the moog keyboard, completed the bands' sound.’
      • ‘Most intriguing on these two brief noise spasms is lead singer Beverly's grating howl.’
      • ‘The man burst into a quick spasm of crude laughter and then quickly fell silent.’
      fit, paroxysm, attack, burst, bout, seizure, outburst, outbreak, explosion, access
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2mass noun Prolonged involuntary muscle contraction.
      ‘the airways in the lungs go into spasm’
      • ‘Heat is often used after the first 24 to 48 hours to reduce pain, relieve muscle spasm, and improve local blood flow.’
      • ‘As he twisted around to glance at the television news, his back went into spasm.’
      • ‘The disease is characterized by a gradual increase in skeletal muscle rigidity and muscle spasm.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Experience sudden involuntary muscular contractions; twitch convulsively.

    ‘my body spasmed violently’
    • ‘Things slowly got worse, despite treatment, until my back began to spasm.’
    • ‘Beginners are often plagued by this cramp, which strikes like a boxer's body blow and happens when an overworked diaphragm begins to spasm.’
    • ‘The muscles in my lower back had just spasmed.’
    • ‘My chest begins to spasm from lack of oxygen.’
    • ‘He began to spasm from cramps at the end of a 90-minute practice.’
    • ‘My gut started spasming violently.’
    • ‘Pain shot through his body and his legs spasmed uncontrollably.’
    • ‘My diaphragm and lungs spasmed so severely that I woke up screaming because the pain was unbelievably excruciating!’
    • ‘She abruptly crashes to the floor and begins to spasm as though having a seizure.’
    • ‘In fact, my arms were spasming with cramps by the time I got home.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French spasme, or via Latin from Greek spasmos, spasma, from span ‘pull’.

Pronunciation

spasm

/ˈspaz(ə)m/