Definition of Sorbian in English:

Sorbian

adjective

  • Relating to the Sorbs or their language.

    • ‘Many Sorbian graduates of Wittenberg later evangelized among the Slovaks because their languages were so similar.’
    • ‘The 500 or so Sorbian immigrants who arrived in Galveston, Texas, in 1854 were primarily bilingual, speaking German and Wendish, and called themselves German Wends.’
    • ‘During his free time, he traveled around in the area, made the acquaintance of other Sorbian students in Leipzig, and learned about the grandeur of his Slavic heritage.’
    • ‘The development of Sorbian identity and self-consciousness greatly influenced young Kosyk.’
    • ‘Over the course of centuries, Sorbian population was often decimated (almost half of the population died during the Thirty Years War), and Sorbs came to be discriminated against in many ways.’

noun

  • The traditional language of the Sorbs, a Slavic language related to Polish and Czech. It has been revived from near extinction and has around 70,000 speakers.

    Also called Wendish or Lusatian
    • ‘Ladin and Sorbian (not Serbian) are alive and well in Germany.’
    • ‘These include Faroese, Modern Hebrew, Irish, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, and Welsh.’
    • ‘Anna did not speak Sorbian - a significant shortcoming.’
    • ‘The surprise is all the more mysterious because the poetry that he wrote is not available in English; the five-volume critical edition of his works being published is in his native Sorbian.’
    • ‘He began to write poetry in Sorbian at the age of 25.’
    • ‘During Bismarck's Kulturkampf, the Kaiserreich advocated a policy of Germanization that depreciated Sorbian, and again in Nazi Germany after 1937 it was forbidden to write or sing in Sorbian.’
    • ‘Sorbian language has been forbidden in many centuries, most recently in Nazi Germany, where one could not write or sing in Sorbian.’

Pronunciation

Sorbian

/ˈsɔːbɪən/