Definition of snowcat in English:

snowcat

(also Sno-Cat)

noun

  • A tracked vehicle for travelling over snow.

    • ‘The Trail Tenderizer is available for operation behind a snowmobile in four- and six-foot widths and an eight-foot width for pulling behind a small snowcat.’
    • ‘That's when I came to work for Vail Resorts in 1984 as a snowcat operator in the winter.’
    • ‘Common themes became evident, such as using biodegradable hydraulic fluid in snowcats, wildlife sensitivity, and trail designs that protect streambeds.’
    • ‘In 1965, the world's first heli-ski operation began ferrying clients up to the ridges of the Purcell Range - a service now offered in the region by three chopper companies and a snowcat service.’
    • ‘Our route links temporarily into sprawling ski area trails groomed by a snowcat.’
    • ‘All food and supplies have to be brought in by snowcat or helicopter.’
    • ‘Of the two work horses pulling implements, snowcats groom larger trails while snowmobiles most frequently cover narrower trails or work on inadequate snow to support a snowcat.’
    • ‘Finally, there is the nirvana: a ski-in, ski-out home that is what it says it is: situated right on slopes which are snow-covered throughout the season and groomed by the lift company's snowcats daily.’
    • ‘As in Borovets, I don't believe it's a question of needing new massive investments, but simply of attending to maintenance regularly, and getting the snowcats up and down those slopes as soon as the new snow falls.’
    • ‘Nate, the snowcat mechanic, gave me a ride over the pass to the Chevron in Garden City in his ancient Ford, its hefty exhaust leak filling the cab with fumes.’
    • ‘During one winter on Hood, high winds blew out a window in a snowcat being used for a rescue.’
    • ‘Half an hour later, we were convincing the snowcat driver that the there was plenty of snow for him to rebuild the ramp into the longest rail at the park.’

Origin

1940s: from snow + caterpillar.

Pronunciation

snowcat

/ˈsnəʊkat/