Main definitions of snark in English

: snark1snark2

snark1

noun

  • An imaginary animal (used typically with reference to a task or goal that is elusive or impossible to achieve)

    ‘pinning down the middle classes is like the hunting of the snark’
    • ‘Unlike the snark, which never actually appears, the capercaillie does exist; but the huge birds are rarely seen, and have attained near-legendary status amongst the hunting fraternity.’
    • ‘Twelve years ago, the search for a great leg-spinner was Australian cricket's version of Lewis Carroll's hunting of the snark.’
    • ‘They're so fixated on the hunting of the snark that they're prepared to flame everybody to a crisp.’

Origin

1876: nonsense word coined by Lewis Carroll in The Hunting of the Snark.

Pronunciation

snark

/snɑːk/

Main definitions of snark in English

: snark1snark2

snark2

verb

[NO OBJECT]North American
informal
  • Make snide and sharply critical comments.

    ‘they even snark about her family background’
    • ‘I'm not going to snark even though I could.’
    • ‘Hey, are they allowed to snark before I do?’
    • ‘For some reason the site's not letting me comment and since I was going to snark anyways it's just as well.’
    • ‘In the meantime I suspect the greatest difficulties might arise if your sister was to snark about the netbuddy situation or actively criticize you and your decision making.’
    • ‘But I'm really just snarking pre-emptively, because the next bit is the worst.’
    • ‘Not trying to deliberately snark here, just pointing out that you seem awfully heavily invested in him letting go of something you already know he's not going to let go of.’
    • ‘It's easy to snark about this kind of thing, though.’
    • ‘I really, truly, don't mean to snark, but your question is your answer: nobody dates because to not do so would be "unhealthy".’
    • ‘Must … resist … urge … to … snark!’
    • ‘It only bothers me when she then snarks about other people not wanting to do the same.’
    • ‘Eve snarks back, "Except Oscar hasn't graduated."’
    • ‘There will always be something in D.C. to snark about.’
    • ‘I've got a legitimate reason for snarking like that.’
    • ‘Given that I found the link on another journal where it was also being snarked at, I'm wondering if the site owner got some rather straightforward feedback and decided to modify her presentation a bit.’
    • ‘There's nothing to snark about.’
    • ‘To hide their anxiety, they snark.’
    • ‘"No doubt this will lead the news tonight," he snarked.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the only thing I like about watching the show is snarking about the contestants.’
    • ‘Never snark at someone's pronunciation.’
    • ‘If you've waited a day to crack your joke, you're better off finding the next thing to snark about.’

noun

mass nounNorth American
informal
  • Snide and sharply critical comments.

    ‘a worthwhile blog cannot live on snark alone’
    • ‘This may be the result of a medical condition, in which case we should hold our snark.’
    • ‘Readers, bloggers, leave your suppositions in Comments; satire and snark are welcome.’
    • ‘Whether it's reporters, editors, or the general public, no one is above their savage snark.’
    • ‘Here's the whole story - plus some bonus snark if you read to the end!’
    • ‘All of this inspired a good deal of snark among the Washington media.’
    • ‘I'll argue, as well, that where there is ironic discourse, snark cannot be far behind.’
    • ‘I can't imagine how that came to happen; I've always tried so hard to avoid snark and be civil.’
    • ‘Gotta love the the snark of pointing out that the endorsement form is badly written.’
    • ‘For all my snark and displeasure, there are still some good things about the Complete Seventh Season.’
    • ‘But to automatically cry "oh, get a sense of humor" when someone points out disrespect, snark, or nastiness is disingenuous and fundamentally unkind.’
    • ‘I've dished out so much snark, in the past, that I figure when I'm on the receiving end, I should buck up, bite down, and take it like a soldier.’
    • ‘He deserves every bit of snark he gets for this ridiculous contention, but I still have a question: why?’
    • ‘Snark aside, this is a reasonable observation.’
    • ‘Aside from snark, I find it very heartening, actually.’
    • ‘No snark intended, but college isn't just all about socializing and hanging out.’
    • ‘This, on the other hand, is just pure mean-spirited snark, the more so as it invites us to feel political schadenfreude over geniune tragedy.’
    • ‘Ok, that didn't take long to devolve into totally pointless snark.’
    • ‘There's something intensely likable about the guy's face, and that's important - an actor filled with sarcasm or snark would torpedo this film.’
    • ‘This is not a place where snark and sarcasm are part and parcel of the social landscape.’
    • ‘A little more research and a little less snark might have made this an interesting post.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: originally in the dialect senses ‘snore, snort’, ‘find fault’.

Pronunciation

snark

/snɑːk/