Definition of smut in English:

smut

noun

  • 1A small flake of soot or other dirt or a mark left by one.

    ‘all those black smuts from the engine’
    • ‘On the tube, already doubly late, trying to get to King's Cross in time for the Intercity, I noticed in the squeeze a woman with a smut on her forehead.’
    • ‘Acid smuts had damaged clothing hung out to dry in his garden and the paintwork of the plaintiff's car parked in the highway.’
    imperfection, fault, flaw, defect, deformity, discoloration, disfigurement
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  • 2[mass noun] A fungal disease of cereals in which parts of the ear change to black powder.

    ‘a few bad crop years with smut and drought and frost’
    [count noun] ‘fungal infections such as the smuts’
    • ‘The only sure method of smut control is by using an effective seed treatment fungicide.’
    • ‘Therefore, a combination of an effective smut fungicide plus a fungicide effective against seedling blights is recommended.’
    • ‘It is also possible that the corn smut, or a metabolic product of the smut, could affect fermentation of acetic acid - producing bacteria and ethanol - producing yeasts.’
    • ‘The primary purpose of treating wheat seed is to protect it from the smut diseases with common bunt being the target disease this season.’
    • ‘Onion smut produces dark powder streaks on seedlings of the onion family.’
    mildew, fungus, must, mouldiness, mustiness
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  • 3[mass noun] Obscene or lascivious talk, writing, or pictures.

    ‘porn, in his view, is far from being harmless smut’
    • ‘He has warned ‘cosmopolitan, liberal secular Jews’ of the fate they will suffer for assaulting Christianity with smut and pornography and the murder of the unborn.’
    • ‘They have told radio broadcasters that they had better clean up their act, cut out the smut or face being permanently silenced.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, as was the case in the previous two films, when confidence in witty comedy fails, the makers of American Pie feel it necessary to overcompensate with the smut.’
    • ‘The term ‘airport novel’ is now used rather disparagingly, many claiming the genre is a front for smut, sleaze and shop-soiled erotica.’
    • ‘She cuts to the chase in her smut and sexual politics; I would expect she does the same when tackling the business side of things too.’
    • ‘If you want to take your erotica to the beach, Aqua Erotica (Three Rivers Press) is the first waterproof smut I've seen.’
    • ‘He then regaled us with unfunny smut, which he seemed to think was sexy and salacious.’
    • ‘Or, if you just want to give your regular smut a fresh, personal touch, why not rewrite some of your favourite erotic stories and recast them with your own characters, as McBride proposes.’
    • ‘If it's smut you want, we've got some first edition Henry Miller around here somewhere.’
    • ‘Filters are required to keep children safe from porn and other such smut.’
    • ‘So much humour now revolves around smut and the constant interjection of the f-word and other expletives.’
    • ‘Most marvel that once upon a time, TV and movies helped adults to protect children and the rest of us from everyday exposure to violence, profanity, and smut.’
    • ‘I decided to break my usual habit and write some erotica rather than just pure smut.’
    • ‘And until what's left of our constitution is gouged out, everyone else is free to watch, read, or listen to all the smut they like in the privacy of their own laptops.’
    • ‘It bugs me that we will clamber to look at smut in the guise of erotica and art, but we still hide our porn collections so people don't think we're dirty old ladies or men.’
    • ‘According to Dr. Scott Hahn, one of the most serious problems we have today is smut on TV, such as Boston Public or The Shield, that encourage or glorify immoral behavior.’
    • ‘Since the first one appeared in 1964, there's been a debate about whether it's filth, smut, porn, tasteful erotica or high art.’
    • ‘So where's the smut - on the canvas, or in our heads?’
    • ‘Maybe some clubs don't want to be associated with the blokey smut that is served up on The Footy Show.’
    • ‘If some readers did not approve the Times of India which has pioneered smut and erotica in the Delhi Times (sometimes in the guise of sex education), it would not be the highest circulated English paper in the country.’
    indecency, immorality, impropriety, salaciousness, smuttiness, smut, lewdness, rudeness, vulgarity, dirtiness, dirt, filthiness, filth, foulness, coarseness, crudeness, grossness, vileness, nastiness, impurity, immodesty, indelicacy, indecorousness, unwholesomeness, scabrousness, ribaldry, bawdiness, suggestiveness, eroticism, carnality, lasciviousness, lechery, licentiousness, libidinousness, degeneracy, depravity, amorality, debauchery, dissoluteness, prurience
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Mark with flakes or soot or other dirt.

    ‘the smutted sky’
    • ‘Then Night came down like the feathery soot of a smoky lamp, and smutted first the bedquilt, then the hearth-rug, then the window-seat, and then at last the great, stormy, faraway outside world.’
  • 2Infect (a plant) with smut.

    ‘smutted wheat’
    • ‘In the greenhouse test the number of plants showing smutted ears (on any of the tillers) after 3 months was recorded; in the field the percentage of smutted tillers was determined among 100-200 tillers sampled.’
    mouldy, mildewed, blighted, smutty, smutted, musty, fetid, fusty, rotting, rotten, decaying, putrid, putrescent, stale, damp
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘defile, corrupt, make obscene’): related to German schmutzen; compare with smudge. The noun dates from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation:

smut

/smʌt/