Definition of smuggle in English:

smuggle

verb

[with object]
  • 1Move (goods) illegally into or out of a country.

    ‘he's been smuggling cigarettes from Gibraltar into Spain’
    ‘cocaine smuggling has increased alarmingly’
    • ‘To make sure the Merry Men did not get new hardware, he cracked down on smuggling and the black market.’
    • ‘Aren't almost all handguns used in crimes stolen or smuggled into the country illegally already?’
    • ‘The 1990s saw a massive increase in the smuggling of tobacco and cigarettes into the United Kingdom.’
    • ‘In the border area of Entikong and Tebedu, timber smuggling is increasingly rife and openly practiced.’
    • ‘Organized crime uses our ports to smuggle everything from heroin to guns to illegal immigrants.’
    • ‘Eight of the nine had previously pleaded guilty to being involved in the dealing of smuggling cigarettes.’
    • ‘In the years after independence, Macedonia launched a clamp-down on cigarette smuggling.’
    • ‘He faces up to 10 years in jail for illegally smuggling arms into India.’
    • ‘So long as there is a demand for the produce, illegal excavations and the smuggling of antiquities will continue.’
    • ‘Strict penalties will be handed out to those involved in the smuggling or illegal collection of birds, he added.’
    • ‘Now the governments of the UK and Jamaica are spending £2m on a crackdown on cocaine smuggling.’
    • ‘There are at least seven million legal weapons in Germany, but perhaps twice that number in illegal guns smuggled in.’
    • ‘They also have enforcement of copyright laws and tighter control on pirated goods being smuggled into the country.’
    • ‘Velchev said they played a role in the smuggling of excise goods such as cigarettes and liquor.’
    • ‘The pictures show baby lemurs from Madagascar that have been illegally smuggled into the country.’
    • ‘Thailand's police are on the alert for an increase in smuggling of diesel oil at sea.’
    • ‘Armed robberies, fuel and cigarette smuggling, money-laundering and counterfeiting must also end.’
    • ‘The packets of cigarettes were being smuggled inside cans labelled as peas or beans.’
    • ‘Revenue was also busy cracking illegal cigarette and tobacco smuggling.’
    • ‘He says his only link to the attack is an admission he hired two vans which he believed would be used for cigarette smuggling.’
    1. 1.1with object and adverbial of direction Convey (someone or something) somewhere secretly and illicitly.
      ‘he smuggled out a message’
      • ‘The film was smuggled into Indonesia aboard a repatriation ship and given a lot of publicity in the republican press.’
      • ‘The mystery remained how the bombers managed to smuggle their explosives on board.’
      • ‘He has no idea that she has been down to the designer label store and has smuggled the illicit buys into the house in an Asda carrier bag.’
      • ‘Many illegal aliens pay thousands to be smuggled from Mexico into the United States.’
      • ‘Until last year the Singapore authorities gave people who smuggled gum into the country a year in jail.’
      • ‘Virtually, with every passing week, we discover people trying to smuggle explosives into Saudi Arabia.’
      • ‘The demand for designer dogs has people smuggling hundreds of puppies across the border.’
      • ‘Under Irish law a person cannot be prosecuted merely for helping to smuggle people into Ireland.’
      • ‘Shah smuggled a video camera into Afghanistan to secretly film the reality of life under the Taliban.’
      • ‘Malaysia has deported an Iraqi suspected of being the ringleader of a syndicate that smuggles people out of western Asia to Australia via Malaysia and Indonesia, the official news agency Bernama reported Wednesday.’
      • ‘An inquiry is under way after guns and fake explosives were smuggled on to a flight leaving Manchester Airport.’
      • ‘We learn that this job involves acting as a human storage device to smuggle cocaine into America.’
      • ‘One was posing as a baggage handler from London's International Airport, and he smuggled weapons aboard.’
      • ‘As long as there is a market for the reptiles, then people will continue to smuggle them into the country.’
      • ‘Blackman is smuggled out of the country, given a new identity, and tucked away in a small town in Italy.’
      • ‘Many of the Israeli army operations in the area involve finding and destroying a network of tunnels used to smuggle weapons and explosives from Egypt into Gaza.’
      • ‘While they do not expect thugs to try to smuggle weapons into the arena, they are aware of the potential for violence outside.’
      • ‘His father paid people traffickers to smuggle his son out of the country to try to start a new life in Britain.’
      • ‘The explosives were smuggled in to the prison and every thing was set for the date.’
      • ‘In three of these students were found to have secretly smuggled mobile phones into the examination rooms.’
      bring illegally, take illegally, run, sneak
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from Low German smuggelen, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

smuggle

/ˈsmʌɡ(ə)l/