Definition of smoother in English:

smoother

noun

  • 1A device or substance used to give something a flat, regular surface or appearance.

    ‘a pair of English oak 19th-century bed linen smoothers’
    ‘wrinkle smoothers’
    • ‘There is some suggestion that wax was used to make the pleats permanent, by ironing it in with the warm glass linen smoothers.’
    • ‘The cloth could be 'ironed' by rubbing it between a whalebone plaque and a fist-sized glass or stone smoother which was heated either in hot sands or by the fire.’
    • ‘Some of the best smoothers include our boy-cut briefs with tummy control.’
    • ‘Read on for the latest smoothers and radiance boosters for every area of your body.’
    • ‘Exfoliating beads and pineapple smoothers leave face feeling soft.’
    • ‘At least six of these, with U-shaped grooves that run the full length of the specimens, are fragments of arrow shaft smoothers.’
    • ‘These scrapers with convex and concave shapes are great smoothers of bowls and other wood hollows and domes.’
    • ‘Thong smoothers were likely used to make rawhide thongs, or strips, that could have been part of equestrian accessories such as bridles.’
    • ‘The vitamin-A-based creams remain top smoothers in the anti-aging arsenal.’
    • ‘Extoliating beads and pineapple smoothers leave face feeling soft.’
  • 2A person who deals successfully with a problem or difficulty.

    ‘he acts as a smoother of relations’
    • ‘Here's what transition smoothers can do to ensure things go smoothly when on-boarding new team members—especially after an acquisition.’
    • ‘Their employees were known as smoothers—intermodal geniuses with the Midas-like ability to make any business they touched run smoother.’
    • ‘These ubiquitous smoothers of business should be adept at navigating the complex relationships among the prominent local business families.’
    • ‘Even formal groups engender informal member roles such as social smoothers, hard workers, or experts in a given area.’
    • ‘The final three of our nine leadership metaphors are these: by-the-book commanders, resigned prisoners, and, finally, conflict smoothers.’
    • ‘Leaders are the removers of obstacles and smoothers of paths allowing the teams to self-organize and find their own path to delivering the project.’
    • ‘Relationship builders are the harmony-creators, discord-dissolvers, and emotion-smoothers that all teams need in order to be maximally effective.’
    • ‘Prior research into corporate strategy views such firms as effective smoothers.’
    • ‘Pauses may be very useful as communication smoothers.’
    • ‘Some stars choose not to be smoothers of rough edges, and the void in the leadership department is yet another reason many believe the team will stumble.’

Pronunciation

smoother

/ˈsmuːðə/