Definition of smash-and-grab in English:

smash-and-grab

adjective

British
  • Denoting a robbery in which the thief smashes a shop window and seizes goods.

    ‘a smash-and-grab raid on a jeweller’
    • ‘Damage running into tens of thousands of pounds has been caused by thieves in a smash-and-grab effort to steal high-value cars at a specialist mid-Essex service centre.’
    • ‘Dealers will learn first-hand what they can do to prevent being the target of a smash-and-grab burglary - or worse.’
    • ‘Detectives are probing links between two smash-and-grab robberies on Bolton banks and a ram raid on a Bury bank.’
    • ‘He said smash-and-grab raiders last month stole a number of items worth a total of £2,000, including a £500 28-inch widescreen television.’
    • ‘Police are also asking residents to look out for a stolen car which has been used in a number of burglaries and smash-and-grab raids in the district.’

noun

British
  • A smash-and-grab robbery.

    ‘the number of smash-and-grabs I have seen is unbelievable’
    • ‘David, what about the phenomenon of smash-and-grabs that was so common 10 years ago?’
    • ‘An Otley woman has said it is business as usual at her shop - despite being the victim of two smash-and-grabs in just over a week.’
    • ‘The cost of smash-and-grabs has soared 25 per cent in the last year with the value of property stolen from cars increasing from £295 million to £369 million.’
    • ‘Businesses and warehouses became targets, he started smash-and-grabs and dozens of crimes were committed to feed a £1,000-a-week heroin habit.’
    • ‘Worse, any stranger who tried a smash-and-grab would have only two ways to run - east, or west - and the Dwarvenhame Tunnel offered no convenient side roads or places to lie hidden while the pursuit thundered by.’
    burglary, theft, thievery, stealing, breaking and entering, housebreaking, larceny, shoplifting, pilfering, filching, embezzlement, misappropriation, swindling, fraud
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

smash-and-grab

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