Definition of smart set in English:

smart set

noun

the smart set
  • Fashionable people considered as a group.

    ‘the smart set of London lived within a few square miles’
    as modifier ‘a snooty Oxbridge smart-set snob’
    • ‘The movie takes place in the social context of fast money, smart-set villains, gilded gambling houses, and late-night powder snorting.’
    • ‘And yes, this is the Grandpa lecture, the why-in-my-day rant that makes the smart set roll their eyes.’
    • ‘On Fridays the museum stays open until 9 and has evolved into a singles scene for the smart set.’
    • ‘While happy to discuss past administrations' experiences with intellectuals, Troy is keeping mum about his current boss's interaction with the smart set.’
    • ‘His brother Davey is a jack-the-lad who dabbles in coke-dealing for the smart set but who dies after a brutal encounter with a sinister car dealer.’
    • ‘On the 18 th-century grand tour, Europe's smart set would gad about their continent in search of cultural enlightenment.’
    • ‘Not that such disincentives dissuade the smart set from guzzling foreign brands.’
    • ‘Where do the smart set hang out on Saturdays - Paris, Milan, New York?’
    • ‘I think that spirit is present in the new show as well, which will make it unpopular among the smart set in Europe, and the object of much cassette-smuggling in Tehran.’
    • ‘There's an elegant pink cocktail dress, chic and dressy, but because it's made from lightweight silk, it will be ideal to wear while mingling with Sydney's smart set.’
    • ‘Some people will pay to eat a meal surrounded by the smart set.’
    • ‘The phrase ‘talk show hosts’ means about as much as ‘newspaper writer,’ but it makes the smart set cluck with satisfaction, and roll their eyes with practiced contempt.’
    • ‘So the more demanding smart set has been somewhat neglected.’
    • ‘It was learned in April that the restaurant, a favourite rendezvous of the smart set, was in a parlous state financially, owing a massive £679,000 to creditors.’
    • ‘Santayana was an Anglophiliac and pandered shamelessly to aristocrats and the smart set.’
    • ‘And he'll tell me about some literary party and say, ‘I'm sure the straight smart set will be coming out in droves.’’
    • ‘When he remarks that the problem with eating caviar on toast is not having sufficient caviar but enough toast, readers could smile knowingly and consider themselves part of a sophisticated, smart set.’
    • ‘And, since the guests include a microbiologist sparring with his celebrity-newsreader wife, and a bohemian artist just dumped by her politician lover, they are clearly meant to represent a cross-section of the metropolitan smart set.’
    • ‘Some people believe that Evelyn Waugh hit high C with some of his satires, but there is a fatal streak of ingratiation running through the work of Waugh, a Wildean desire to suck up to the smart set, to please the aristocracy.’
    • ‘It reminds you that a truth, repeated enough times, becomes a cliché. Once the smart set identifies something as a cliché, it's stripped of its truth and regarded simply as a trick - regardless of how true the cliché may actually be.’