Definition of slush pile in English:

slush pile

noun

informal
  • A stack of unsolicited manuscripts that have been sent to a publishing company for consideration.

    • ‘Their material ended up in the slush pile.’
    • ‘But celebrity writers such as Madonna don't do slush piles.’
    • ‘She began, as we all do, in someone's slush pile.’
    • ‘My assistant goes through the slush pile.’
    • ‘The authors I've found in the slush pile have all - without exception - had fantastic letters.’
    • ‘The slush pile consumes a lot of resources inside a small publishing company.’
    • ‘His novel was plucked from the obscurity of the slush pile by the wife of his agent Luigi Bonomi.’
    • ‘His job is to work through the slush pile of unpublishable books, sending out rejection letters to disappointed would-be authors.’
    • ‘We've got a couple more books in the works that are from the slush pile.’
    • ‘The term ' slush pile ' gives a clear flavour of the contempt in which unsolicited submissions are held.’
    • ‘These unsolicited submissions are known in the book trade, throughout the English-speaking world, as the slush pile.’
    • ‘The book is then part of the editor's slush pile.’
    • ‘These days, you have to be very good indeed, or very lucky, to be pulled out of the mountainous slush piles on the desks of children's publishers.’
    • ‘But it is not compulsory to submit anything to a slush pile.’
    • ‘"Kathleen came in through the slush pile," he reveals.’
    • ‘I particularly recommend her piece on the slush pile.’
    • ‘One point to note is that every writer, and every novel, is at some point in someone's slush pile.’
    • ‘I also read manuscripts from the "slush pile" that came in from hopeful amateur writers everywhere.’
    • ‘I feel very guilty about it, because I'm a fiction writer and I've been sending to slush piles for years.’
    • ‘Their writing seems like random samplings from the slush pile at a third-rate college newspaper.’