Definition of slush in English:

slush

noun

mass noun
  • 1Partially melted snow or ice.

    ‘the snow was turning into brown slush in the gutters’
    • ‘I had never ventured to the south, so that is the way most of us went, trudging through the snow and slush on the ground.’
    • ‘Without a floor mat, snow and slush can soak into your carpet, through the carpet padding, and you will hardly notice that it already caused your floor pans to get rusty.’
    • ‘It comprised long, daily walks through snow and slush to the county Library, where I worked on a manuscript to keep my mind occupied.’
    • ‘I brushed away snow and slush and raised the prize to eye-level.’
    • ‘Rain pounded the streets, turning the snow into muddy slush.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, my snow honeymoon came to an abrupt end when beautiful white snow increasingly turned to disgusting brown slush, all of which we had to trudge through every day.’
    • ‘With the Lower East Side ankle deep in snow and slush, our vehicle sits safe and sound, parked streetside a few blocks over on Norfolk Street.’
    • ‘He stood up too and they walked out, their boots crunching though the thin layer of slush and snow covering the ground.’
    • ‘In April the snow started melting, and in May there was rain and slush, the snow disappeared and there were glimpses of sun.’
    • ‘Then, in a flurry of snow and slush, the Christmas holiday was over, and the long drive toward Boston had begun.’
    • ‘The machine took the biggest power you could find - requiring two firemen if it was a hand-bomber - not only to push the apparatus but to steam the snow into slush.’
    • ‘It was pitch black, with snow and slush dotting the cobblestone paths.’
    • ‘Well, we don't do mud, we just make them crawl around in the dust and grime on the ground from the mud left over or the snow slush left over or whatever.’
    • ‘Light snow, much slush; the windshield is opaque in seconds.’
    • ‘Fess waded through the ankle-deep coating of snow and slush around the 18-wheeler.’
    • ‘Indeed, consider how many drivers on our roads today have any experience of driving in snow, slush and frost?’
    • ‘The match, which was put into severe doubt the previous day with a covering of snow and slush on the pitch, inevitably turned out to be quite scrappy due to the slippery surface.’
    • ‘Only an inch or so but it still worked; puddles forming lightly in the streets as cars ran over slush and dirtying the snow.’
    • ‘That afternoon the sidewalks were awash with slush and half-melted snow.’
    • ‘There are times an aircraft and crew will get stuck at a location because the snow and ice become slush, making take-off impossible.’
    1. 1.1 Watery mud.
      • ‘Life is still much the same: a constant battle against the elements, as wind and sleeting rain batter the coal-mining land to black slush and mud.’
      • ‘Use caution in taxiing retractable-gear aircraft through slush or mud.’
      • ‘In several late winter snow storms, it ploughed right through the ugliest passing lane slush, allowing the driver to arrive relaxed even after two hours of full-on winter driving.’
      • ‘Three hundred and sixty-five days, come rain or shine, through muck and slush, I never missed a day, sir.’
      • ‘Ogwad jogged merrily down the beaten dirt path (turned to mud by the slush covering it) leading through the woods.’
      • ‘He kicked the back flaps of his coat, a bit of slush staining the underside, but he didn't care, he needed to hurry.’
      • ‘Nothing really beats waiting down in the slush of mud.’
      • ‘Every season brings in different surprises but the most disgusting to the garage is that which carries with it rain, mud, slush and grime.’
      • ‘Young New Zealanders waded, often wounded, among mud, slush, rubble and the dead, searching for a way to end their war.’
      • ‘And then I thought, ‘Oh great, spring, I remember, that's when they replace the piles of slush with piles of mud and it's a big rainy mess.’’
      • ‘Wes observed as they tracked through mud and what remained of the slush.’
      • ‘Rubble and slush from potholes and mud dumped recklessly by the cable companies and various civic agencies have only added to citizens' woes.’
      • ‘‘There are no pavements on Gordon Street, so students and employees of the law school would have no choice but to walk on the slush and mud,’ she said.’
      • ‘The hems of the dress that I wore dragged along the slush of mud on the ground and my sleeves snagged against the branches that had been stripped of its leaves.’
      • ‘What would have been a truly fantastic course, full of switch backs, and single track climbs, became much more of a mud slush… but still a lot of fun.’
      • ‘Or after dull and dreary three four days of continuous rain, mud and slush, the sun peeps out from behind the clouds and a beautiful rainbow reflects the glory and the color of the sun.’
      • ‘Mud, debris and knee-high slush from landslides blocked roads, cutting off many remote villages.’
      • ‘Soth shivered at the cold mixture of mud and slush and jumped up on the bench.’
      • ‘It was still raining: potholes, felled trees, mud, slush and scattered rocks made it difficult to negotiate the highway.’
      • ‘In this story a bird is sent down to earth to dry out some of the mud in the primordial slush so that islands can be formed for the Ainu.’
      melting snow, wet snow
      View synonyms
  • 2informal Excessive sentiment.

    ‘the slush of Hollywood's romantic fifties films’
    • ‘The best of the slush is undoubtedly both lyrically rueful and melodically engaging.’
    • ‘People who think that this ending is purely sentimental slush should give it another try.’
    • ‘When once-naïve Hong Kong cinema became sentimental and driven by external goals, we received multiculturalized slush.’
    • ‘From high - school reimaginings of Shakespeare to romantic gross-out comedies and back, they vary wildly in quality from zippy, witty fun to indigestible slush.’
    • ‘Yes, the holiday season is here complete with kiddie fodder that is virtually unwatchable for anyone over the age of 10 and mawkish slush about the joy of the family.’
    • ‘And he is more than matched by Williams's calculated turn as the cold-hearted killer, in a role which marks a welcome break away from the sentimental slush of recent projects.’
    • ‘It always moves me and makes me feel better about life and is the perfect antidote to all the ersatz sentiment that sprays over us like noxious slush at Christmas time.’
    sentimentality, mawkishness, over-sentimentality, emotionalism, overemotionalism, sentimentalism, banality, triteness
    View synonyms

verb

[no object]
  • Make a squelching or splashing sound.

    ‘there was water slushing around in the galley’
    • ‘We slushed along the lake and made camp below it.’
    • ‘Kris slushed through the puddles of water, icy wind stinging her eyes.’
    • ‘The river slushed by with a beautiful white noise and the birds tweedle-dee-deed.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: probably imitative; compare with slosh.

Pronunciation

slush

/slʌʃ/