Main definitions of slug in English

: slug1slug2

slug1

noun

  • 1A tough-skinned terrestrial mollusc which typically lacks a shell and secretes a film of mucus for protection. It can be a serious plant pest.

    • ‘Diatomaceous earth, shredded bark, eggshells, and wood ash have been used as barriers to prevent slugs from feeding on plants.’
    • ‘The only major pests of hostas are slugs, which thrive in the moist, cool, shady areas that hostas love.’
    • ‘More conventionally, a sharp barrier such as gravel or crushed seashells or eggshells sprinkled around plants will stop slugs and snails in their tracks.’
    • ‘Suzy Davis of Arizona recommends Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) to rid your plants of slugs.’
    • ‘Firefly larvae live underground or beneath leaf litter, feeding on earthworms, snails, slugs, and soft-bodied insect larvae.’
    • ‘The legislation met some initial controversy after it was reported that the new law would extend protections to snails and slugs.’
    • ‘One or two pairs of tentacles are found on the head, depending on whether the snail or slug is terrestrial (two pairs) or aquatic (one).’
    • ‘The omnivorous diet of these insects is known to include garden pests such as slugs, snails and cutworms, so they can be regarded as beneficial allies.’
    • ‘Brains of limpets and abalones are much simpler than brains of garden snails and slugs in histological differentiation.’
    • ‘Molluscicides destroy snails and slugs, which can be pests of agriculture or, in waterbodies, the vector of human diseases such as schistosomiasis.’
    • ‘Look for pests such as caterpillars, flys, mites, termites and slugs are garden pests that might like to make a meal of your geraniums.’
    • ‘Centipedes also eat slugs and smaller insect pests.’
    • ‘Since some plants are more susceptible to slug injury, check around those particular plants to detect slugs.’
    • ‘Twenty slugs were filmed while receiving 10 swim-eliciting tail stimuli at a 2 min inter-trial interval.’
    • ‘Fieldfares find their food (including slugs, insects and earthworms) on the ground often locating it more by sound then sight.’
    • ‘Watch for slugs and other pests on plants, in pots, under trays, in corners and beneath benches.’
    • ‘Slugs and snails are mainly nocturnal, and the sun's heat can be fatal to slugs and to all mollusc eggs, so cultivate the soil thoroughly to bring them to the surface.’
    • ‘They also eat slugs, snails, earthworms, and small fish.’
    • ‘As gardeners already know, all other slugs and snails (or gastropod mollusks, to the experts) sport a soft and slimy foot.’
    • ‘A claim of moral equality on behalf of animals is surely not plausible if one means literally all animals, including centipedes, slugs, and amoebas.’
  • 2A slow, lazy person.

    • ‘The sugar high took me into the wee hours, and as a result, today I am feeling slug like and overly emotional.’
    • ‘Even someone with his track record - and, for a tubby obnoxious slug, he has managed to shack up with some stunners - must occasionally fall at the first hurdle.’
    • ‘And every Dem is going to have the fact that some Dems voted for this slug crammed down their throat.’
    • ‘I'm not sure how I became such a walker, because I come from a long line of slugs.’
    • ‘Even though you're dying to bitchslap your clueless roommate, loser boyfriend or loathsome slug of a boss, play nice.’
    • ‘If there's somebody sitting around saying, you know, I'm just a lazy slug, my first question is, ‘are you?’’
    • ‘The memos are self-defeating in that regard - why would the sort of low life slug who would write such a thing actually care enough to write such a thing?’
    • ‘That fat, overweight, pompous slug would never be able to get me himself, she thought, without sending one of his henchmen to retrieve me.’
    • ‘If, as you say, she hates to be alone, she will most likely tolerate this slug until she either can't stand it another minute, or he departs… whichever comes first.’
    • ‘Maddie was the one going to college, and I was a Generation X slug.’
    • ‘And maybe everything has added up to make a big old apathetic slug.’
    • ‘At one level, I am - or at least I was - quite a decent swimmer; and it's exactly the sort of exercise I need to stop myself turning into a middle aged slug.’
    • ‘I mean, he's just like this slug who hangs around the house all the time.’
    • ‘Slugs do not talk, they don't use their mobile phones for more than a short while, any time they do talk religion and politics are avoided and there's no smoking or eating by the driver or slug.’
    • ‘The highly hyped competition may be tempting the odd couch slug to dribble down to the nearest five-a-side pitch, but he or she will be lucky to get a free slot when they get there.’
  • 3An amount of alcoholic drink that is gulped or poured.

    ‘he took a slug of whisky’
    • ‘The cherries were for the family; a slug of what Hoard called ‘Christmas cheer’ was for my father.’
    • ‘Joe took a slug of his beer to half empty the can and, there!’
    • ‘When they say ‘spiritual micro-breaks’, they don't mean a slug of vodka in the server room, either.’
    • ‘The last straw comes when three old Russian ladies snub my invitation to join our flotilla, dog-paddling away as if no one had ever offered them a slug of beer through a ten-foot hose.’
    • ‘He takes another slug of vodka, poured for him by one of the younger members of the company.’
    • ‘We came home, ran the bath, sat in it, drank a slug of whisky each and climbed in to bed, exhausted by thinking.’
    • ‘To drink, we have all the good cold water you want, and a slug of red wine.’
    • ‘Hearty Aussie reds like the latter go happily in a sangria-style mix - slip a couple of orange slices into each glass and add a whoosh of soda water, a clunk of ice-cubes and a slug of brandy if it's raining.’
    • ‘If he offered you a slug from the bottle he either liked you, was testing you, or didn't want to drink alone.’
    • ‘Place the first six ingredients in a food processor and whizz until smooth then splash in a slug of Kirsch.’
    • ‘He quickly takes a slug of beer and stares up at the trophies.’
    • ‘Do you know how long it's been since I had a slug of whiskey?’
    • ‘Makes around 4 litres of cordial (which you can kick up a notch with a splash of soda water and a slug of your favourite gin).’
    • ‘By this time, Santiago had poured a hefty slug of rum into a cup and handed it to Jesse.’
    • ‘Good thing he hadn't just taken a slug at his drink or I'm sure it would have come out of his nose.’
    • ‘I tasted it once and had to take a slug of sour mash to get the sweet out of mouth.’
    • ‘Put all the fruit in a saucepan on a gentle heat and add a couple of tablespoons of caster sugar and a slug of something pleasantly alcoholic such as brandy, whisky or even sherry.’
    • ‘‘It's so hot in here,’ he complained, walking back from the toilet, wiping his mouth with the back of his hand and reaching for a slug of ‘black and tan’.’
    • ‘After delicately dipping a last onion ring in mayonnaise, he moistens his throat with a slug of brandy, and starts to talk.’
    • ‘Secrets and truths emerge, which cause emotional bruising, but nothing a slug of Scotch can't cure.’
  • 4An elongated, typically rounded piece of metal.

    ‘the reactor uses embedded slugs of uranium’
    • ‘For the first time in nearly two thousand years everyone everywhere was paying for everyday articles using slugs of base metal.’
    • ‘I would have been shocked if we had because he was using an air gun with an enormous piece of slug instead of birdshot.’
    • ‘The team built a robot which could distinguish a slug from a stone and pick it up.’
    • ‘For smaller vessels, this may be as easy as firing a copper slug into an outboard engine.’
    1. 4.1North American A bullet, especially a lead one.
      • ‘Speaking of feminism, I am no feminist but I do like and respect women so I would have a strong urge to put a .50 calibre slug through the guy in this picture.’
      • ‘One shot I missed clear, probably because my abilities were off, but one slug removed his left ear and a clump of his hair, yet the third bullet struck his right shoulder and caused him drop back to the floor.’
      • ‘He had been instantly neutralized, and killed almost as quickly, by a massive 12 gauge rifled slug wound that had destroyed his heart.’
      • ‘His second .45 slug missed harmlessly, but it didn't matter, because the first had found the gunman's thorax and dropped him cold.’
      • ‘There's also a cantilever, rifled slug barrel available at modest cost.’
      • ‘A former mental patient went after him with a cleaver, and Shea dropped him with a single .38 slug to the belly.’
      • ‘In any case, a diminutive .410 bore, 1/2 oz rifled slug zinging out at 1,830 fps is a respectable load.’
      • ‘Three slugs ripped through the space Karl had just vacated.’
      • ‘The 1 oz, .72 caliber shotgun slug had torn through the center of his chest, killing him outright.’
      • ‘The.22 caliber slug had ricocheted off the top of his cranium, knocking him cold as effectively as a hammer.’
      • ‘A man with a small revolver was trying to sneak up on them, and Niane kindly ended his existence with a well-placed .45 slug in his forehead.’
      • ‘The 12-gauge.50-caliber slug weighs in at 385 grains and is nestled in a sabot.’
      • ‘In addition the heavy bullet has a lot of sectional density and should penetrate deeply compared to a standard 30 or 40-grain slug.’
      • ‘As he shuffled to the side, another slug tore a huge hole in the wall where he had been a heartbeat before, throwing wood pieces in his face.’
    2. 4.2A missile for an airgun.
      • ‘I subsequently had a look and there were about 60 slugs from an air gun, all over the place on my property, the trajectory of which had obviously come over the kindergarten.’
  • 5A line of type in Linotype printing.

    • ‘For those who recall the Imperial typewriter, the copy-takers and slugs of type set in hot metal, it is the next stage in the ongoing media revolution.’
    • ‘Monotype machines cast single sorts; it was Linotypes that cast slugs.’
  • 6Computing
    A part of a URL which identifies a particular page on a website in a form readable by users.

    ‘writers can edit the slug that will become an article or page URL’
    • ‘Changing longer post slugs into short, keyword-centric slugs will increase your click-through rate in the search engine result pages and make your content easier to share.’
    • ‘This has happened to most of us at one point or another: We start optimizing a website's URL structure or permalink slugs to be more user- and SEO-friendly, and we end up forgetting about an old URL that dozens of websites were already linking to.’
    • ‘This function is what WordPress will use to generate the URL slugs from your post titles.’
    • ‘You just add the episode number to the slug or permalink of your podcasts.’
    • ‘I've had a bit of a problem editing posts with a slug of 'miscellaneous' - for some reason when I republish the post, it likes to change the slug to ' miscellaneous - 2'.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Drink (something, typically alcohol) in a large draught; swig.

    ‘she picked up her drink and slugged it straight back’
    • ‘He pushed his empty glass to the side, and slugged the remaining beer directly out of the long necked bottle.’
    • ‘At 10:29 p.m. I'm slugging some coffee and feeling good.’
    • ‘We return to our hotel to slug whiskey and create conversational doodles in the private bar.’
    • ‘The woman slugged the bourbon back in one abrupt gulp and held out the shot glass for a refill.’
    • ‘A bit of the swig, swig, slugging back old granddads cough medicine are we?’
    • ‘She slugged the first drink down smoothly, then without any hesitation she grabbed the other drink and slugged it down too.’
    • ‘You barely have time to slug it down before they're racing back to tear the cup out of your hands and slam your seat back into it's upright and locked position.’
    • ‘She now slugged the remainder of her drink back in an attempt to numb her irritation.’
    • ‘Her eye twitching more violently, she slugs the fresh cup of tea.’
    • ‘We stood around down by St Mary's church slugging back bottles of beer and singing ‘There is an Isle’ until we were hoarse with it.’
    • ‘Matt picked up the champagne bottle and slugged the wine straight down.’
    • ‘Popping the lid off, I poured two into my hand and slugged them back with a gulp of my soda.’
    drink, swallow, guzzle, slurp, attack, down, drink down, drink up, force down, get down, finish off, polish off, drain, empty, imbibe, have, take, partake of, ingest, consume, sup, sip, lap
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘sluggard’): probably of Scandinavian origin; compare with Norwegian dialect slugg large heavy body. Sense 1 dates from the early 18th century.

Pronunciation:

slug

/slʌɡ/

Main definitions of slug in English

: slug1slug2

slug2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]North american
informal
  • 1 Strike (someone) with a hard blow.

    ‘he was the one who'd get slugged’
    • ‘Drink companies say they're being unfairly slugged with the cost of a refund in South Australia - an unfair tax.’
    • ‘Neverthelesss, they both proved themselves solid winners, even if Ramirez benefited from the powerful Atlanta Braves attack, and Robertson got a big lift Houston's slugging lineup.’
    • ‘Geraldton ratepayers will be slugged an 8.5 percent rate increase this year.’
    • ‘Workers, of course, even the lowly paid, will be slugged with an extra $6.20 to fill a prescription.’
    • ‘There they gather short, or editor-shortened, letters in which correspondents with opposing views slug away at each other on a topic selected by the editor.’
    • ‘Most drivers are probably unaware of the fact that all imported cars are slugged a 15 per cent tariff to protect the local car manufacturing industry.’
    • ‘Now they're going to be slugged by this brand new tax when they actually come to sell the property.’
    • ‘After reaching over and playfully slugging Sandy's arm, Carla remarked ‘I know it's part of your personality, but sometimes I get tired of your teasing.’’
    • ‘After perhaps five minutes, Joel slugged Benji in the face, knocking him down.’
    • ‘He led the team last season with 11 pinch hits and made 55 starts, finishing with a .429 slugging percentage.’
    • ‘No way he finishes seventh in slugging this year.’
    • ‘Today slugging percentage has replaced batting average, and Tejada's slugging percentage was less than five-sixths that of Rodriguez.’
    • ‘As a 19-year-old, he knocked 23 balls over the fence to get a .513 slugging percentage in A-ball.’
    • ‘Now, it's probably a bad idea most of the time for guards to slug inmates - although I can think of lots of exceptions - but it isn't cruel and unusual punishment.’
    • ‘Bangalore suffers as Singh and Gowda slug it out’
    • ‘You've got to realise that when you do buy a good on credit, you'll be slugged with an interest charge.’
    • ‘Brettingen, who hit .478 with 44 RBI and a .739 slugging percentage in 2002, is picking up right where he left off, hitting .438 in the young season.’
    • ‘It wasn't a ladylike slap, it was an all-out, full-fisted slug to the jaw that could have broken his nose if she had been aiming for it.’
    • ‘But he worked on his swing in the off season and finished fifth in the winter league with a .531 slugging percentage.’
    • ‘Participants can be fined or gaoled, employers who choose to pay them can be fined, and unions found to have organised the actions can be slugged up to $110,000.’
    • ‘Provoked into a confrontation, Laramie slugs the photographer in front of a watchful eye and is ultimately sentenced to undergo anger management therapy.’
    • ‘Cesar managed to wriggle a hand free and slugged Glenn in the side of the face, knocking him to the ground.’
    • ‘Numbers break down into columns of infinite refinement: total bases, slugging percentage, on-base percentage, and on and on.’
    • ‘And it continued on - from 1998 through 2002 Sammy hit 292 homers while batting .306 with a .649 slugging percentage.’
    • ‘The man gave Mr. Love one huge slug in the face just as Tommy and Joe, the security guards, hurried up the stairs, Tommy huffing frantically.’
    • ‘Locals who have called Balmain home for more than 50 years are being forced to sell or subdivide their homes after being slugged with land tax bills of up to $16,000 a year.’
    • ‘He is closing on a record with his .610 on-base percentage - 28 points higher than the mark he set in 2002-and has an .827 slugging percentage.’
    • ‘Sierra also led all qualifiers with a 1.067 slugging percentage last week, and he posted a .500 on-base percentage.’
    • ‘It's easy for many to cheer when a developer is slugged for higher taxes.’
    • ‘Then when I asked - when I walked across the street, the next thing I know is somebody slugged me.’
    strike, slap, smack, cuff, punch, beat, thrash, thump, batter, belabour, drub, hook, pound, smash, slam, welt, pummel, hammer, bang, knock, swat, whip, flog, cane, sucker-punch, rain blows on, give someone a, give someone a good beating, give someone a good drubbing, box someone's ears
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Settle a dispute or contest by fighting or competing fiercely.
      ‘they went outside to slug it out’
      • ‘Contestants slug it out to be the best news reader on TV and the winner goes into a head to head clash with Ms Bailey, as the viewer decides who gets the $800,000-a-year job.’
      • ‘Students in York have been slugging it out in a competition to find the most popular piece of art in a city bar.’
      • ‘Twenty four towns across Northern Ireland will see top teams from home and the continent slug it out in what is the biggest competition ever staged in Northern Ireland.’
      • ‘This is followed by a ladies fight over 4 x 2 minute rounds, and they slug it out as well as any man.’
      • ‘And at that time, I was the independent guy who kind of - whose career had kind of gone downhill and was now slugging it out anywhere and everywhere that I could be paid.’
      • ‘One in the last five Premiership games and a string of similar enlightening statistics gleaned from scanning this season's ‘goals for’ column show why Wanderers are slugging it out with the rest of the relegation pack.’
      • ‘Well, maybe, while the yokels are slugging it out in the parking lot, the ‘have-mores’ can sneak in the back door and make off with the cash register.’
      • ‘For a first time spectator, it's the only phrase that seems suitable because the sight of bigger than average, fully grown men slugging it out, eyeball to eyeball, is as engrossing as sport could possibly be.’
      • ‘The annual Kaman Cup golf day was contested at Nowra on November 24, with 256 players slugging it out on a somewhat sodden track.’
      • ‘We'd been slugging it out against the vexing factor of distance, but now that other awful variable - time - had jumped us from behind and was punching our kidneys.’
      • ‘Dennis is at the stage of his career where it's not about putting on more size - at 260 pounds contest weight, he's beefy enough to slug it out with the biggest brutes in the sport.’
      • ‘At still other times, the two sounds fight for bragging rights, slugging it out between our ears.’
      • ‘Nearly 16,000 fight fans roared their appreciation as the two big men slugged it out.’
      • ‘There was a contest, too, as both women slugged it out for supremacy in the final set.’
      • ‘Aden Ridgeway likes their ideas on political positioning, and, faced with contesting the next election, must weigh up whether he's got a better chance in the centre than slugging it out with the Greens.’
      • ‘After jabbing him early on, Rigby let his warrior instincts get the better of him and he ended up slugging it out in a fight which had the Wythenshawe Forum crowd on its feet.’
      • ‘With his refined boxing skills and blending in his tendency to slug it out, he can still entertain us with some great fights in the future.’
      • ‘India will be slugging it out with 12 teams including Champions Trophy winners Holland, Pakistan, Spain, South Africa, Malaysia and Poland.’
      • ‘In the 21st century, though, the focus of democratic debate has moved from the street to the broadcasting studio where, more and more, ordinary people are slugging it out with their politicians live on air.’
      • ‘The cute boy was cynosure of all eyes while his cousin was slugging it out in the National ‘B’ Chess Championship tournament at Chennupati Ramakotaiah hall here on Tuesday.’

noun

North american
informal
  • A hard blow.

    • ‘Adam frowned and gave him a hard slug in the shoulder.’
    • ‘The final slug landed between Furchtner's eyes, and he tumbled out the window.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: of unknown origin; compare with the verb slog.

Pronunciation:

slug

/slʌɡ/