Main definitions of slop in English

: slop1slop2

slop1

verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial of direction (of a liquid) spill or flow over the edge of a container, typically as a result of careless handling.

    ‘water slopped over the edge of the sink’
    • ‘He stirred the tea, fast, some slopped into the saucer as he watched the swirls disappear.’
    • ‘So full was the cup that I was unable to carry it without slopping in the saucer.’
    • ‘Water slopped and spilled and lacerations across my skin burned but I held her in a white-knuckled grip and she didn't resist.’
    • ‘Wielding large buckets, they are slopping water from their individual compartments over the knee-high partition and into the aisle.’
    • ‘Sweating and red-faced, he'd stood in the middle of the hall, the tea slopping over the marble in a red tide and the newspaper rapidly disintegrating in the currents.’
    • ‘Only when it started slopping into the overflow did I blink back to awareness and shut it off.’
    • ‘And it's not just Carson's coffee slopping over the top of its container, either.’
    • ‘She gasped as another memory floated to the surface, her drink slopping over the railing, cup falling to the ground.’
    • ‘Wine slopped from the urns he held in each hand as he shouted from the bottom of his lungs, ‘Let the Bacchanalia begin!’’
    • ‘I felt somewhat embarrassed and on the way back to my desk, I almost tripped over the water cooler, slopping Fred's oh so precious caffeinated brew.’
    • ‘This would slop over the levees between the lake and the city and fill the city ‘bowl’ with water in some places as deep as 20 ft.’
    • ‘It disgusts my room-mates when I slop coffee all over the table.’
    • ‘She spoke in a shrill voice, and the water slopped all over the floor when she scrubbed it.’
    • ‘In the office the next morning several bookcases had toppled and some water from the fish tank had slopped into the tortoise pens (don't ask), but things were generally ok.’
    • ‘All of a sudden she felt a sharp jolt come from the ship and her hot chocolate slopped right over the edge.’
    • ‘She said, the dark foaming brew slopping onto the table as she set it down.’
    • ‘When we finally remove it, the middle of the crepe is cooked through while the edges slop all over the Formica, eliciting shrieks of disgust from aforementioned seven-year-olds.’
    • ‘With a fair amount of splashing and slopping, the drinks were laid before them.’
    • ‘Our driver had stopped by a roadside huddle of tents and horses, grabbed an empty bottle and returned with the concoction slopping down its neck.’
    • ‘In a whisk a frosty mug nearly slopping over with the golden drink was in front of Deuce.’
    spill, flow, overflow, run, slosh, splash, splatter, spatter
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Cause (a liquid) to spill over the edge of a container.
      ‘I slopped coffee in my saucer’
      • ‘Her face whitened and she put it back on the table hastily, slopping a little of the liquid out.’
      • ‘Be careful with large candles, as the potential for slopping a pool of burning hot spillage is greater.’
      • ‘Fortunately, she was lapping the soup up with great neatness and delicacy, which was sort of a relief: Jinx had been afraid she was going to slop it all over the table.’
    2. 1.2 (of liquid) move within a container, noisily slapping against the sides.
      ‘water slopped around in the bottom of the boat’
      • ‘She felt that receiving the child food directly into little personal bowls was undignified and wasteful, since much of it slopped over the sides.’
      • ‘With a lunge of his hand he trusted a large glass of ale at Kriseis, which slopped over the side and onto her face and clothes.’
      • ‘Ramirez turned over, a wave of water slopping against the marbled side of the bath.’
      • ‘Creamy soup slopped over the side as he stared into the middle distance.’
    3. 1.3with object and adverbial Apply or pour (a liquid substance) in a casual or careless manner.
      ‘they spent their weekend slopping on paint’
      • ‘I'm upset that I scrubbed the kitchen floor Saturday and today it has been slopped with snow, slush and salt.’
      • ‘He swept his arm in a circle and slopped whisky on the floor.’
      • ‘As she slopped the food into her mouth with a wooden spoon that had been provided, she thought about her escape.’
      • ‘A heavyset man waved his mug of ale in the air and slopping the contents onto the ground.’
      • ‘I think I eat perfectly, other than slopping enormous amounts of food onto my shirt.’
      • ‘The next time, I didn't use the tape and just made sure to take extra care not to slop any paint on the top of the mat.’
      • ‘Spen was in particularly frisky mood and ended up slopping his drink down my jeans while Ross lined me up far too many vodkas on the arm of a chair.’
      • ‘Claire and the art students were slopping paint on the walls!’
      • ‘I ran my finger around the tip of the glass seeing as I was practically done with the mushed up veggie slash stew that was slopped onto my plate.’
      • ‘The actual paint is slopped and dripped and patched and layered and dabbed and spattered and scumbled and misted, sometimes in a natural-ish pattern, other times more fantastically.’
      • ‘When I'm at a bar and start slopping my drink all over the place, it's because I'm tired.’
      • ‘People lined the bar, singing an off-key song about the wonders of the sea, raising their tankards of ale and slopping the liquid every which way, drenching those next to them.’
      • ‘I don't want him to think I don't mind his mates slopping their coffee all over the carpet and not apologising, or talking about how many traffic cones they nicked during their college days as if they were yesterday.’
      • ‘The old hits got the drunks singing and snogging and slopping paper cups of beer.’
      • ‘I slopped the stuff on and miraculously the ashen timbers of our bench and table suite turned slowly back to a healthy brown.’
      • ‘The next thing I know T.J. is sobbing, Ruth is holding her hand and I have slopped coffee in my saucer.’
      • ‘Max stood up so quickly he slopped the alcohol down his shirt and scared the brunette so bad that she squeaked and shrank away from him.’
      • ‘Gray stood up, wavering slightly, slopping beer onto the table from the mug in his right hand.’
      • ‘Eric laughed nervously, glancing at the dangerously slopping pot of hot coffee.’
    4. 1.4slop through Wade through (a wet or muddy area)
      ‘they were slopping through paddy fields’
      • ‘I remembered the look on Jim's face as he slopped through the slush in Rye, mulling young John's fate.’
      • ‘The water had risen again and was slopping through the lower rooms.’
      • ‘The mud stuck to her shoes, but she didn't care as she slopped through the baseball field up to her friend.’
      • ‘He slopped through a puddle, dampening the bottom of his jeans.’
      • ‘I slopped through the puddles.’
  • 2slop about/aroundBritish no object Dress in an untidy or casual manner.

    ‘at weekends he would slop about in his oldest clothes’
    • ‘We enjoyed the morning in a rather more comfortable manner, taking a late breakfast and slopping about the house until mid-day.’
    • ‘On a hot and humid day like today my normal survival approach is to turn the fans on full, adjust the ventilation to draw air from the north side of the house to the south, draw the blinds, and slop around waiting for things to cool down.’
    • ‘On a Saturday morning, when most people are slopping about in a fleece, she was wearing a smart suit.’
    • ‘The rest of the time I slop about in chinos and I never, ever, not even on Sundays, wear a necktie.’
    • ‘Our Christmas will probably mean slopping around the house in our tracksuit pants, hoping it will snow.’
    • ‘They were always immaculate; there was no slopping around in tight, ill-fitting jeans and trainers.’
    • ‘I also indulged myself with a new pair of soft, comfortable grey trousers for slopping about indoors.’
    • ‘Now I'm sitting here after the shower, slopping around in my trackpants etc, my hair damp and still unbrushed… obviously with no intention of turning the webcam on at the moment lol.’
    • ‘We wore white coats, sometimes, when we needed to impress those who controlled the budgets, but mostly we slopped around, isolated from the users by some combination of locked doors, security passes and keypads.’
    • ‘She took a friend's advice: ‘Don't slop around in your dressing-gown.’
    laze, laze about, laze around, lounge, lounge about, lounge around, do nothing, loll, loll about, loll around, loaf, loaf about, loaf around, slouch, slouch about, slouch around, vegetate
    View synonyms
  • 3slop outBritish no object (especially in prison) empty the contents of a chamber pot.

    ‘the indignity of slopping out’
    • ‘It is not necessary to make more than passing reference to the rights claimed by prisoners relating to pornography, slopping out, voting and governors' reports to realise just how far, in some areas, the Human Rights Act has gone.’
    • ‘During his eight-year tenure he has occasionally made life difficult for his political masters by highlighting inhumane prison practices such as slopping out.’
    • ‘Around one quarter of prisoners have to go through the unacceptable ritual of slopping out.’
    • ‘In Britain, slopping out was branded as one of the indignities of an antiquated prison system.’
    • ‘And it called on the Executive to ‘ensure the Scottish Prison Service makes the ending of the practice of slopping out an urgent priority’.’
    • ‘This is partly to end slopping out, which is the lot of a quarter of Scottish prisoners, for whom grim Victorian buildings are no longer deemed adequate.’
    • ‘Apparently, slopping out served to ‘damage [this prisoner's] human rights, his human dignity and to arise in him feelings of anxiety, anguish, inferiority and humiliation’.’
    • ‘The actions follow a recent case in Scotland where a prisoner was awarded damages of €5,000 for having to slop out.’
    • ‘However, only two of the twelve priorities were actually implemented - an end to slopping out and improved security.’
    • ‘While I would prefer prisons to be modern and humane, I am not particularly thrilled at the £2,450 compensation paid to a thief for having to slop out in prison.’
    • ‘The bill for a legal row over slopping out is almost 100,000-and rising - it was revealed yesterday.’
    • ‘Ten years ago, trebling and slopping out were common.’
    • ‘I'm glad to hear he did his daily slopping out routine without question.’
    • ‘In 1996 prison inspectors slammed slopping out as ‘inhumane’.’
    • ‘The distortion of tradition by the greed virus can be seen in the demand by prisoners for slopping out compensation and payment for work done.’
    • ‘He is the lawyer who plunged the Scottish Executive into a compensation crisis by successfully challenging slopping out in prisons.’
    • ‘There is no slopping out as the Libyans have toilets, baths and showers.’
    • ‘The move has come about as a result of a case brought by a prisoner in May who was forced to slop out in jail.’
    • ‘It is not so much the embarrassment or hardship of slopping out that is irking these ex-cons - it is more the public impression of what humiliations or hardships such a practice involves.’
    • ‘I want to see an end to slopping out as soon as it is physically possible to do it.’
  • 4with object Feed slops to (an animal)

    ‘they think a farmer's wife spends all her time slopping hogs’
    • ‘They milk the cows, feed the calves, slop the pigs, and check the roosting hens before sitting down to tea in their own kitchen.’
    • ‘At night they counted dollars to buy more acres, to raise more grain, to buy more corn to feed more horses, to slop more pigs, to feed more chicks, to make more dollars.’
    • ‘Cows were milked, chickens were fed and hogs were slopped.’
    • ‘You don't really think that Bush likes to get out there and slop the hogs and move the hay around, do you?’
    • ‘On his way, he noticed that the pigs hadn't been slopped, so he went to the corncrib, where he found some sacks.’
    • ‘His brother is too sickly to do any chores, so Chris ends up working on the house and slopping the hogs while his father drives hours to his job.’
    • ‘No hogs to slop, feed to pitch, mash to mix, wood to split, fire to lay.’
  • 5North American no object Speak or write in a sentimentally effusive manner; gush.

    ‘she slopped over her dog’
    • ‘Besides that, their songs are unremarkable, hookless and slop along with lumpen arrangements that recall swimming in porridge.’

noun

  • 1slopsWaste water from a kitchen, bathroom, or chamber pot that has to be emptied by hand.

    ‘sink slops’
    • ‘The faster she tried to move, the slower and more labored her steps became, held back by drifts of garbage washed together with slops and urine.’
    • ‘If she were caught, the Guild would no more claim her than a pile of castle kitchen slops.’
    • ‘As the local women empty their slops into the drain outside the shop, the secretary runs out with her disinfectant spray to ward off infection.’
    • ‘There were many cesspools in the city and more in the suburbs, and slops were being emptied on to peaty land.’
    • ‘Time consumed by the vessel in moving from loading or discharge port anchorage to her loading or discharge berth, discharging ballast water or slops, will not count as used laytime.’
    1. 1.1 Semi-liquid kitchen refuse, often used as animal food.
      ‘she emptied some slops for the chickens’
      • ‘This all changed when someone (probably an economist) spotted the nice turn that could be made by feeding slops or swill to pigs, and considered farming pigs intensively.’
      • ‘Although regulations have been issued against feeding animals with slops from restaurants, such a practice is still common in animal farming.’
      • ‘A jocular sort, but with a heart as empty as a pig trough waiting for slops.’
    2. 1.2 Unappetizing semi-liquid food.
      • ‘With a light laugh I opened the doors and entered behind him, taking up a plate and serving myself a ladle - full of unappetizing grey-brown slop.’
      • ‘‘Hey, look at this,’ said Nicholas, spooning from a tray of applesauce-like slop as he stood by a display screen.’
      • ‘Unlike the previous houses she stayed at he actually took the time to pet her and spend time with her, and not only that he didn't try to feed her that slop that all the others called cat food.’
      • ‘The food court had a stripped down version of our favorite fast food slop house, as well as a panorama of ethnic fast food counters.’
      • ‘That and the breakfast was usually limited to an unappetizing bowl of protein slop.’
      • ‘And for his stint in prison he spent 48 hours in a prison cell, fed on slops, deprived of sleep, and occasionally having buckets of ice cold water thrown over him.’
      • ‘I may have called that food slop, but compared to this I consider it a meal fit for kings!’
      • ‘Atobe protested, ‘If the food I serve is slop, how come you were pigging out at lunch?’’
      • ‘Wykk's finger pointed to the brown slop that was called food and with a resigned glance at where Blaise had sat I ate.’
      • ‘We bought Chinese food for the first and last time from one of those walk-in joints with the pictures of the food above the register that never look like the grayish beige slop they boxed up for you.’
      • ‘The bell rings and students begin piling out of class, ready to run into the cafeteria where a line up for slop is gathering.’
      • ‘Therefore to stuff the baby with paps and slops is to deprive it of the most strengthening food; for if its stomach be filled with pap, there cannot be any room for food.’
      • ‘Finally, Ian steps away, off to buy his daily rationing of overpriced, indigestible slop.’
      • ‘You walk into the shop only to find the same old cabbages and red pepper paste slop.’
      • ‘And, still half-rooted in the lifestyle of the starving artist, his daily diet was presumably more student slops than Upper East Side chic so that's what he aspired to.’
      • ‘Since the launch of the programme in 2001, hospital meals should no longer consist of inedible slop but healthy - and even gourmet - food.’
  • 2North American mass noun Sentimental language or material.

    ‘country music is not all commercial slop’
    • ‘Fans of cable channels or mush-brained problem dramas may appreciate this sentimental slop; others are warned.’
    • ‘The third album by this five-year-old U.K. act has a sweet but thorny simplicity all its own, morose at times and dramatic elsewhere, with large doses of murky tenderness that skillfully side-steps syrupy slop.’
    • ‘A film with music every five minutes is like a novel with ten exclamation points on every page - yet we, who would be embarrassed by a surfeit of exclamations, accept such musical slop unblinkingly.’
    • ‘Musicianship that is this intense can easily become sloppy, and there's no slop here.’
    • ‘Unoriginal soundtracky slop that sacrifices story and melody for statement and style.’
    • ‘But the middling adult contemporary slop, although awful, isn't what ultimately drowns the style.’
    • ‘Be it his usual commercial slop or this stab at achieving some street credit, he falls amazingly flat, as he always has.’
    • ‘One man's masterwork is another's undeniable piece of celluloid slop.’
    • ‘Just saying his name, feeling his name wriggle off my tongue was enough to make me go weak inside - not that my insides were all ready like slop from just seeing him and hearing his gorgeous voice.’
    • ‘With a more clever script, Sleepover could've been watchable, but it lacks the courage to be anything more than pure slop.’
    • ‘Their biggest asset is that they know how to pen a tune but don't get mucked up in self-indulgent slop, and know when to pull out all stops.’
    • ‘I continue to be baffled by the fact that the US networks keep taking absolutely brilliant television programming from BBC America and turning it into slop.’
    • ‘After wading through the shallow molasses of the agnostic gospel slop, I was in need of a true church catharsis.’
    • ‘But, no, that director and his writers are satisfied to churn out the standard, predictable slop.’
    • ‘Let's hope that his penchant for sentimental slop is behind him because no one else can sport such a nondescript look, while bringing an undercurrent of rage or emotional torture to the screen.’
  • 3Nautical
    A choppy sea.

Phrases

  • on the slops

    • informal Drinking alcohol (especially beer) in large quantities.

      ‘when we get on the slops, the first one to look at their phone has to pay’
      • ‘He would have written a great work had Clark not got him on the slops.’
      • ‘"You and my grandson here on the slops, is that it? Allowing him to lead you astray?"’
      • ‘"At least we can get on the slops for a couple of days, ah who gives a rats! Might as well stay and listen to the jukebox and sink a couple."’
      • ‘Greg left for a night on the slops with Bob.’
      • ‘He has locked up all his favourite vodkas, which is why he hasn't been caught out on the slops in two years.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘to spill, splash’): probably related to slip. Early use of the noun denoted ‘slushy mud’, the first of the current senses (‘unappetizing food’) dating from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation

slop

/slɒp/

Main definitions of slop in English

: slop1slop2

slop2

noun

archaic
  • 1A workman's loose outer garment.

  • 2slopsWide, baggy trousers common in the 16th and early 17th centuries, especially as worn by sailors.

    1. 2.1 Clothes and bedding supplied to sailors by the navy.
    2. 2.2 Ready-made or cheap clothing.
      • ‘Mr Fuller puts this down to losing the image of cloth caps and working-class slop, and having a strong premium image now’.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in slop (sense 1)): from the second element of Old English oferslop ‘surplice’, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

slop

/slɒp/