Main definitions of slew in English

: slew1slew2slew3

slew1

(also slue)

verb

  • 1[no object, with adverbial of direction] Turn or slide violently or uncontrollably:

    [no object] ‘the Renault slewed from side to side in the snow’
    [with object] ‘he slewed the aircraft round before it settled on the runway’
    • ‘On my daily commute, I have seen so many instances of bad driving by mobile phone users, from never indicating to slewing all over the road, that it is beyond all doubt that drivers using mobile phones are a menace.’
    • ‘It travels another mile before it begins to slew out of control.’
    • ‘My thoughts flickered back to the night, headlights slewing across the dark tarmac, the body sprawled like a broken bird.’
    • ‘The pipe music shrilled suddenly around her, seeming to come from the bushes at her very feet, and at the same moment the great beast slewed round and bore directly down upon her.’
    • ‘White water poured over the sides of the raft which now was slewing down the wave, broadside into a maelstrom.’
    • ‘Its head slewed back, breaking the contact that it needed to feed.’
    • ‘Opal laughed again and let loose a cannonade of bullets, all steel-tipped for the armor of the truck, and stood his ground as the truck continued to slew towards him.’
    • ‘He slipped, slewed, shimmied, and then gracefully rolled to a stop at the bottom.’
    • ‘As the waiting travellers watched in frozen horror, it slewed crazily to one side as it carried on towards them, wrecking the parapets and heading broadside for the station.’
    • ‘No sooner had I closed my notebook on it pending a future revision and expansion than the wind slewed round, gathered breath, and commenced to blow.’
    • ‘The racer slued to the side and hit a ditch that Brent had not seen.’
    • ‘As I looked back, I thought a train had just slewed across the down line.’
    • ‘Additionally, when performing sharp lane changes at higher speeds, the car will have fewer tendencies to produce yaw; or to put it another way, it will not slew about as much.’
    • ‘Jack slammed on the brakes and slewed to a stop in a cloud of dust.’
    • ‘Brakes strident, slewing to one side like a crippled ocean liner, I'd found myself pulling over to pick him up.’
    • ‘It slewed to the right as it came to a halt, just yards from the neighbouring golf course.’
    • ‘The ship was blown over to a constant list of between 5-10°, and waves occasionally slewed in through the ports, sloshing along the starboard deck and then out again somewhere near the stern.’
    • ‘As soon as it touched the ground, the other engine cut out and the plane slewed off the runway before coming to rest on the grass.’
    • ‘After his maligned defence had slewed apart in the opener against Sweden, he spent so much time restoring their shape that they are now among the most solid in the tournament.’
    • ‘I thought I was in the clear when I felt and heard a ‘thud,’ and the jet slewed to the right.’
    glide, move smoothly, slip, slither, skim, skate, glissade, coast, plane
    View synonyms
  • 2[no object] (of an electronic device) undergo slewing.

    • ‘The telescope slewed to the coordinates as soon as it received the alert and within seven minutes of the start of the burst, it began observations.’
    • ‘ZHS-Zero House Swing - Sometimes incorrectly called zero tail swing, this means that the house and counterweights stay within the machine's width during slewing.’
    • ‘Likewise all practical digital signals are analogue, since the system takes a finite time to slew between any two states.’
    • ‘A grid entered into the navigation system can be used to cue and slew aircraft sensors, weapons, and even the helmet-mounted sight.’
    • ‘Today's announcement marks the first BAT detection autonomously followed by XRT detection, demonstrating the satellite is swiftly slewing as planned.’

noun

  • [in singular] A violent or uncontrollable sliding movement:

    ‘I was assaulted by the thump and slew of the van’
    • ‘One object of the invention is to dynamically reduce resistance in order to decrease the time constant during the signal transition for allowing a more rapid slew of the signal from one logic state to another.’
    • ‘It is preferred that the control means be adapted to adjust automatically the slew of the discharge boom relative to the hopper car.’
    turning aside, turning away, turning, diversion, drawing away
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century (originally in nautical use): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

slew

/sluː/

Main definitions of slew in English

: slew1slew2slew3

slew2

Pronunciation:

slew

/sluː/

Main definitions of slew in English

: slew1slew2slew3

slew3

noun

North American
informal
  • A large number or quantity of something:

    ‘he asked me a slew of questions’
    • ‘But this complicates the question as much as it clarifies it, because ‘war’ also involves a slew of protections.’
    • ‘Gates offers a slew of models for redistributing wealth and reclaiming natural resources.’
    • ‘We'll have a slew of major establishment players running simply because it's ‘their time to run.’’
    • ‘Every few minutes whistles sounded and the workers left the hill as a slew of garbage came raining down, erecting the pile higher again.’
    • ‘A slew of elementary-school field trippers trekked through the exhibits last week, along with hard-core history buffs from the surrounding area.’
    • ‘Normally there would have been a slew of scores around 37-35 but under the wet conditions, the ball just did not travel as most expected.’
    • ‘And then all of a sudden we had a slew of defectors come out in the mid- and late 1990s and what they told us was that everything that we had thought was wrong.’
    • ‘Throughout college, I had a slew of unpaid internships.’
    • ‘None of the batsmen could top 31, and a slew of single-digit scores saw them slump to 107 all out.’
    • ‘As you can see from a slew of the posts below, there's just no end of scandals, investigations and - generally speaking - muck to be raked nowadays.’
    wide variety, large number, lot, diversity, range
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Irish sluagh.

Pronunciation:

slew

/sluː/