Main definitions of sledge in English

: sledge1sledge2sledge3

sledge1

noun

British
  • 1A vehicle on runners for conveying loads or passengers over snow or ice, often pulled by draught animals.

    ‘a dog sledge’
    as modifier ‘a sledge journey’
    • ‘This is then taken to sledges, which are pulled by oxen.’
    • ‘During their historic trek across the constantly moving ocean the women first pulled their 250 lb sledges of food and equipment over house-sized pressure ridges of ice and sat out blizzards.’
    • ‘A lot of people were in the bar watching our sledge trains come around over the sea ice as we pulled up at the field store hangar.’
    • ‘In winter, teams of horses dragged sledges loaded with cut logs across frozen lakes.’
    • ‘The Manchester University academic and a pal are heading to the Greenland Icecap on sledges pulled by giant kites.’
    • ‘All in all this car is probably safer than the estate we drive around in normally, which in comparison handles like a tractor pulling a sledge full of sand.’
    • ‘The competitors who travel by foot and skis pulling sledges with supplies, will cover over 350 miles in four stages from Resolute Bay, Canada, to the North Magnetic Pole.’
    • ‘In actual fact it was just a steep incline without any dangers from crevasses, but the incline was too much for the skidoos to pull the two heavy sledges, now laden with many fossil and rock samples.’
    • ‘He crawled, hands and knees, for two miles pulling a loaded sledge.’
    • ‘The fishermen load the sledge with their catch, and then lean on the crossbars, scooting the mud horse over the flats that would otherwise drag them down.’
    • ‘Scott himself, with Shackleton, made a sledge journey to beyond 82 degrees south in 1902.’
    • ‘The four adult and two baby animals will travel down from their home in the Cairngorm mountains of Scotland to pull the sledge, laden with toys, around town.’
    • ‘To prepare she spent days pulling a loaded sledge along the beach.’
    • ‘The whaling ship Terra Nova sailed from New Zealand in November 1910 and the expedition set off from base the following October, with mechanical sledges, ponies and dogs.’
    • ‘The women have pulled 250 lb sledges packed with food and equipment across the Arctic ice.’
    • ‘In 1901, Robert Scott left London and took a team with dogs and sledges across part of Antarctica, and many important discoveries were made.’
    • ‘Perhaps more importantly, he was one of the few British polar expedition members who appreciated the value of using dogs to haul sledges.’
    • ‘Led by accomplished Polar explorer Jim McNeill, the group will pull sledges weighing up to 250 lb for up to 10 hours a day 210 miles to the Magnetic Pole.’
    • ‘When Scott ordered the last of the dog teams back to base camp, the men pulled their heavy sledges themselves using man-harnesses.’
    • ‘She has had to pull a 60 lb sledge across 200 miles in sub zero temperatures.’
    toboggan, bobsleigh, sleigh
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A small lightweight vehicle, either on runners or having a smooth bottom surface, used for sliding downhill over snow or ice.
      • ‘We discovered that as we had gotten older, we'd gotten taller and larger to the point that sitting on a sledge tends to make it sink into the snow rather than fly screaming towards the trees at the bottom.’
      • ‘Children across York and North Yorkshire reached for their sledges yesterday as a dusting of snow transformed much of the county into a winter wonderland.’
      • ‘At one stage our sledges went over a small crevasse, the runners gliding silently over a snow-covered gap that opened up underneath it.’
      • ‘We walked over to the sledge ride and that's when the armband came in.’
      • ‘Tea trays, as we all know are ten times better than any sledge or toboggan you can buy in the shops, and have the added advantage of being useful as giant frisbees when the snow melts.’
      toboggan, bobsleigh, sleigh
      View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]British
  • 1Travel or slide downhill over snow on a sledge.

    ‘they sledged down the slopes in the frozen snow’
    ‘children built snowmen and went sledging after hundreds of schools shut’
    • ‘In the winter the parks allow you to go sledging and skiing and you will be able to rent the equipment either in town or from a small store in the park.’
    • ‘This is the first time they have been sledging.’
    • ‘For any kids who have not burnt enough energy during the day, there's a perfect slope across the road to go sledging in safety.’
    • ‘Youngsters had a great time sledging down a slope at Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle, County Durham on a bonus day off school.’
    • ‘And fairly often, during the winter, we'd be snowed in, which meant a day off school and the chance to hook up with the children that lived nearby to go sledging.’
    • ‘We passed plenty of families with the same idea, sledging down the slopes near the car park.’
    • ‘It's proper snowman-making snow and when my Mum and I went for a walk on Tuesday onto the Downs there were people sledging.’
    • ‘Locals make use of this small hill in Merseyside to go sledging in the snow.’
    • ‘Elsewhere in the city, young and old alike took full advantage of the snowy conditions, sledging on Knavesmire and building snowmen and women.’
    • ‘From a flurry of delighted children sledging down a snowswept street in Bath to policemen joining in with group of teenagers having a snowball fight in Poole - your pics are helping us capture Britain as it is swept by snow.’
    • ‘We have a family anecdote about either me or my brother sledging over the edge of the car park and down into the path of the traffic on the main road below.’
    • ‘I taught myself to swim in Leg of Mutton pond, skated on Pen Ponds when they froze, sledged in Petersham Park when it snowed, built dams across the brook, and learnt to ride a bike on the path to Bog Lodge.’
    • ‘My opinion changed when my daughter suffered a bad head injury after she sledged into a wall.’
    • ‘Tne Prime Minister took a break from the matters of state to go sledging in Chipping Norton today.’
    • ‘When the snow came, we went sledging under a full moon.’
    • ‘Surprisingly for a sunny Sunday there were very few visitors to the mountains however a few families were sledging on the slopes or walking through the forest using snow shoes.’
    • ‘Last week, I wrote to Santa asking him to send us a White Christmas so that I could take my grandchildren sledging.’
    • ‘The team of athletes from the South Pacific island couldn't hide their delight as they went sledging on the slopes of Braehead's Snow Factor.’
    • ‘When it snows we get to go sledging and make snowmen, windy days let us wrap up warm and collect leaves.’
    1. 1.1with object and adverbial of direction Carry (passengers or a load) on a sledge.
      ‘the task of sledging 10-metre lifeboats across tundra’
      • ‘All the material for the house had to be sledged up the hill by horse.’
      • ‘Another was sledged almost halfway up Mount Taranaki, to provide accommodation for visitors.’
      • ‘That afternoon we made our expedition sledging flags.’

Origin

Late 16th century (as a noun): from Middle Dutch sleedse; related to sled. The verb dates from the early 18th century.

Pronunciation

sledge

/slɛdʒ/

Main definitions of sledge in English

: sledge1sledge2sledge3

sledge2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Cricket
informal
  • 1Make taunting or teasing remarks to (an opposing player, especially a batsman) in order to disturb their concentration.

    ‘Zol smashed Zaheer for a couple of fours immediately after being sledged by the veteran seamer’
    no object ‘in Australia he stared down batsmen, sledged, swore, and kept coming at them’
    • ‘He terrorised batsmen, but he never sledged them.’
    • ‘He has told the player he won't sledge him during the Ashes, which sounds like a parent's promise to leave a light on all night.’
    • ‘One criticism of the young fast bowler is, he is not particularly aggressive; he has never sledged an opponent on the field.’
    • ‘He has been accused of match-fixing, sledging a team-mate and wearing flares - the only charge he can't dismiss.’
    • ‘The next time India play Australia and an Indian batsman crosses 80, you can bet that the Aussies will sledge him about his selfishness.’
    • ‘If you are sledged, and, trust me lads, it's going to happen, then give as good as you get.’
    • ‘I had plenty of faith in my bowlers to get the batsmen out without sledging them.’
    • ‘Jones has reconciled himself to being sledged a lot by the Aussies.’
    • ‘I can't ever remember being sledged, and I can't ever remember sledging anybody.’
    jeer at, gibe at, sneer at, scoff at, poke fun at, make fun of, get at, insult, tease, chaff, torment, provoke, goad, ridicule, deride, mock, heckle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Australian Criticize or insult in a mocking way.
      ‘people on that side of the chamber sledged the Prime Minister and accused the coalition of immorality’
      • ‘The National Party President was once sledged by Parata at a meeting for saying they would bring more women into the National caucus.’
      • ‘Rather than sledge the PM, you would be better to ask Milne how she will recover the money if the green fund fails.’
      • ‘The paper's known for its long campaign to sledge the broadcaster at every possible opportunity.’
      • ‘We're in the odd position where adults are being sledged by other adults for being huge bipedal babies.’
      • ‘The Labor frontbencher says it's the PM who's the "wacko" after he sledged the former Labor government in the Washington Post.’
      • ‘It's not that we're sledging parents but all these (electronic) activities need to be monitored in moderation.’
      • ‘That odious guy sledged me in the lifts today, asked me how I liked being poster girl for The Standard.’
      • ‘But on Saturday he went further, accusing his opponent of constructing a "false narrative" and sledging journalists who had "missed" the yarn.’
      • ‘How's his precious little boy going to cope the first time he gets sledged by a more worldly peer?’
      find fault with, censure, denounce, condemn, arraign, attack, lambaste, pillory, disapprove of, carp at, cavil at, rail against, inveigh against, cast aspersions on, pour scorn on, disparage, denigrate, deprecate, malign, vilify, besmirch, run down, give a bad press to
      offend, cause offence to, give offence to, affront, abuse, be rude to, call someone names, slight, disparage, discredit, libel, slander, malign, defame, denigrate, cast aspersions on, impugn, slur, revile, calumniate
      View synonyms

noun

Cricket
informal
  • 1A taunting or teasing remark made to an opposing player in order to disturb their concentration.

    ‘he was upset after a very personal sledge by the Australian captain’
    • ‘He told a reporter he "must have great ears" when his sledge was repeated, but didn't deny the comment was made.’
    • ‘He hinted the key to rattling Warner's cage was to play mind games with some subtle sledges.’
    • ‘Your piece last month on sporting insults was missing a memorable sledge from an Australia v Zimbabwe cricket match.’
    • ‘As tasteless as any comment about his mum is, he does dish out sledges better than anyone.’
    • ‘Let's hope a well-timed sledge doesn't put him off.’
    • ‘Aussies are masters of the well-timed sledge.’
    • ‘But it was Haddin's hefty sledge which ensured the rivalry between these two teams stayed fiery.’
    • ‘The Proteas paceman noted he may never forgive Clarke for a personal sledge.’
    • ‘A modern sledge is simply a expletive laden insult, designed to cause mental disintegration.’
    • ‘He publicly apologised for the on-field sledge.’
    jeer, gibe, sneer, insult, barb, catcall, brickbat, scoff, slap in the face
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Australian A mockingly critical comment.
      ‘as political sledges go, it was a killer’
      • ‘As political sledges go, it was a killer.’
      • ‘The Q&A session went for 45-minutes, with Turnbull trading sledges with journalists.’
      • ‘All due respect, but that's an incredibly simplistic sledge.’
      • ‘His sledges went a little too far for commercial radio station Triple M, which terminated a live interview with the 54-year-old on Friday morning.’
      • ‘He sent Senator Lambie a series of sledges on her departure, saying she would not achieve much as an independent.’
      • ‘The art of the classic political sledge has been lost as MPs resort to crude invective over clever insults.’
      censure, reproval, condemnation, denunciation, disapproval, disparagement, opprobrium, captiousness, fault-finding, carping, cavilling
      abusive remark, jibe, affront, slight, snub, barb, slur, backhanded compliment, injury, libel, slander, defamation, abuse, disparagement, depreciation, impugnment, revilement, humiliation, indignity, insolence, rudeness
      View synonyms

Origin

1970s: from sledging.

Pronunciation

sledge

/slɛdʒ/

Main definitions of sledge in English

: sledge1sledge2sledge3

sledge3

noun

  • A sledgehammer.

    • ‘Go find a hammer: a claw, a sledge, a ball-peen, whatever's handy.’
    • ‘Steel wedges were driven into the fault and hammered with a sledge until the stone separated.’
    • ‘Their guitars hammer away like sledges to anvils while the rhythm section is hot enough to melt steel!’

Origin

Old English slecg (noun), from a Germanic base meaning ‘to strike’, related to slay.

Pronunciation

sledge

/slɛdʒ/