Definition of sleazy in English:

sleazy

adjective

  • 1(of a person or situation) sordid, corrupt, or immoral.

    ‘a sleazy private detective’
    • ‘He made no apologies for his rackety lifestyle, his liking for louche and even sleazy companions, his lavish consumption of cigars, brandy and champagne.’
    • ‘There's a lot of crazy ways to waste your money and a lot of sleazy people trying to take your money.’
    • ‘What I thought were decisions and loves that were mine and mine alone had been planted in my head by sleazy characters I could barely imagine.’
    • ‘I have been most successful when I have played sleazy people.’
    • ‘Grace glared at the sleazy man that took her hand, as Nicholas and Henry walked off, now deeply engrossed in conversation.’
    • ‘They were a bit more seedy and sleazy, which was what I liked.’
    • ‘This time let's hope the media don't go down that sleazy road.’
    • ‘It's difficult not to appear as a sleazy slave dealer looking over the merchandise.’
    • ‘Country matters involve his mother's rather sleazy partner and his daughter Rosie, Felix's one-time girlfriend.’
    • ‘He meets an assortment of sleazy agents and producers and male prostitutes with hearts of gold.’
    • ‘He used people, he was sleazy and unreliable and he was not what you would call a nice person.’
    • ‘People must think I'm some sleazy bimbo at large in the world and your role is to fret about me and play the hero.’
    • ‘He becomes embroiled in a kidnapping caper involving Debbie's sleazy agent, and Jean goes all the way to help Marva get her shot at fame.’
    • ‘A true and truly appalling story about sleazy people who saw what they wanted to until a decent judge lost his patience and blew a whistle.’
    • ‘You may challenge my ethics, call me a sleazy lawyer, but it is best for you.’
    • ‘She's the sort of no-nonsense girl who can nail those sleazy witnesses.’
    • ‘The applause for him drowned out whatever that sleazy guy at the end was ranting about.’
    • ‘He is completely embarrassed - he is not a sleazy person.’
    • ‘Professional catastrophe, which occurs both to Hugh and to Helen's sleazy father, is little more than an inconvenience to be sidestepped or diverted by trusted retainers.’
    corrupt, immoral, sordid, unsavoury, unpleasant, disreputable
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    1. 1.1 (of a place) squalid and seedy.
      ‘a sleazy all-night cafe’
      • ‘The town's main thoroughfare Duval Street, once borderline sleazy, is now rather smart and other quarters have been similarly refurbished.’
      • ‘A few of our cast make their way along a now quieting Calle Atocha toward the station, bypassing a few sleazy dives as they go.’
      • ‘His city is relentlessly sleazy and oppressive, and its cops apparently exist only to crack open the heads of innocent bystanders.’
      • ‘Lautrec lived in the Montmartre section, the nightlife quarter of cabarets, cafes, restaurants, sleazy dance halls and brothels.’
      • ‘What came as a shock later was his murder in the late '70s. Crane was found in a sleazy motel room, bludgeoned to death by a tripod.’
      • ‘Set in a sleazy modern red-light district, this garish, noisy production has plenty of style, but the play's disparity of substance has been emphasised, not reconciled.’
      • ‘Throughout the whole film I couldn't help but think it was really a comedy despite the harsh realities of Melbourne's criminal and sleazy world.’
      • ‘I won't say that our apartment was a dump, but it was pretty sleazy, featuring the tacky look of most cement-block constructions, although it did come with a big TV.’
      • ‘We are dealing with Internet chat rooms: sleazy and unreliable, with no accountability.’
      • ‘He loved making a sleazy nightclub atmosphere: an excuse for expensive cigars and a lot of red wine.’
      • ‘In the twisted world of this movie's story line, the young pimp is a good guy, and the mayor of its imaginary city is sleazy.’
      • ‘It was a grubby, grotty, sleazy, cruisy dive, but it had atmosphere, and we all loved it despite ourselves.’
      • ‘He went drinking and he usually goes to this sleazy place in Brooklyn.’
      • ‘She drives a little pink car to her favourite sleazy punk places.’
      • ‘He didn't want to buy into that cliche, although jazz did originate in rather sleazy places.’
      • ‘However, Max is addled with a sacred sacrificial goat that he needs to deliver to a wedding in Yeoville, a sleazy suburb in Johannesburg.’
      • ‘Nalirra isn't a low-class, sleazy place like Brandt or Quet, but prejudice is high there and people seem to be tightly wound and minor things tend to set them off.’
      • ‘Every Colombian city has a sleazy shopping district called a San Andresito where you can pick up a bottle of Scotch without paying those pesky import duties that double the price.’
      • ‘I dipped into the heritage-soaked Latin Quarter and the bohemian - if sometimes sleazy - area of Montmartre.’
      squalid, seedy, seamy, sordid, slummy, insalubrious, unpleasant, unprepossessing, mean, cheap, low-class, run down, down at heel
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  • 2dated (of textiles and clothing) flimsy.

    • ‘The anarchic dirty rock group androgenously slip onto the stage, fully clad in sleazy scarves and leather trousers.’
    • ‘Plus the clothes here were perfectly fine, and I wasn't wasting my money on some sleazy outfit from some swanky store just for a date.’
    • ‘Monday night was another night of the fiddley diddley, where Sammy ensured he picked up a title with the sleazy shirt award.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

sleazy

/ˈsliːzi/