Main definitions of slaver in English

: slaver1slaver2

slaver1

noun

historical
  • 1A person who dealt in or owned slaves.

    • ‘Introduced primarily by the Portuguese, corn became a major crop in the African slave shipping areas and their hinterlands to meet the provisioning needs of the slavers.’
    • ‘There are laws that could send the slavers to jail for years but they are never used.’
    • ‘The descendants of Africans captured by slavers and taken to servitude in America are on average better off than the descendants of their neighbours who evaded capture.’
    • ‘All the western slavers had to do was turn up in port and have the slaves brought to them.’
    • ‘These unpopulated regions had been a haven for pirates, slavers, and other scoundrels for centuries.’
    • ‘The slavers were bad enough without being angered by other unlicensed traders stealing their market.’
    • ‘In 1871 Scottish missionary David Livingstone saw hundreds of African women shot while trying to escape slavers.’
    • ‘I already told you, I don't deal with slavers.’
    • ‘The first Europeans to visit the area were Portuguese navigators and British slavers.’
    • ‘Inter-ethnic relations in Africa will for long continue to be affected by perceptions as to who collaborated with the slavers and who suffered most.’
    • ‘The slaver began loudly complaining of her conduct.’
    • ‘The fact that the Boers were slavers, and utterly despised the blacks, was of little consequence to Britain's critics.’
    • ‘The Vikings are the archetypal slavers in European history, enslaving victims in eastern Europe and the Mediterranean area, and selling them in markets far away.’
    • ‘I smile at him, cocking my head to one side, listening to the bickering of the worthless slavers.’
    • ‘This area of tropical rain forest in north-western Borneo, lying along the mangrove coast of the South China Sea, was infested with pirates, slavers and head-hunters.’
    • ‘Britain had outlawed the slave trade in 1808, and her colonies were not allowed to render assistance to slavers.’
    • ‘They could, however, act as bolt holes when gangs of slavers raided, a growing menace from the ninth century on.’
    • ‘It doesn't matter who were the slaves and who were the slavers.’
    • ‘The sword wielding African slavers that the Europeans dealt with usually kept the women and children to add to their own tribe numbers.’
    • ‘Slave trading had been theoretically a capital offence in America since 1820, but no slaver had ever been condemned to death.’
    • ‘In reality the population of the islands were ethnically mixed, because while Zanzibar was a centre of the slave trade Arab slavers had intermarried with the indigenous African population.’
    • ‘When slavers came to harvest humans for sale, these African societies were utterly defenseless.’
    • ‘If you get blood on my bed, I will make you wish you were still with the slavers.’
    • ‘The winner took away with him as many of the losing tribe as he could manage, and those he could not use were sold to slavers.’
    1. 1.1 A ship used for transporting slaves.
      • ‘Some slavers which were altered in this way were sent for re-assay, and a Victorian hallmark will be found on the border and any feet which may have been added.’
      • ‘Political, economic, social, religious, and personal matters at each spot the slaver touched, as well as on the vessel itself, affected the nature of the experience for all concerned.’
      • ‘Considering Cornado's brand of hospitality, any ship in his service was probable no better than a slaver.’
      • ‘The Trouvadore was a Spanish slaver wrecked near Middle Caicos in 1841.’
      • ‘Jessie then found himself aboard The Moonlight, the slaver with its towering sails and masts, cabins and storage space under the deck.’
      • ‘The slave trade within Africa involved very high costs for guarding slaves, transporting them, and feeding them until the slavers from Europe turned up at the port.’

Pronunciation

slaver

/ˈsleɪvə/

Main definitions of slaver in English

: slaver1slaver2

slaver2

noun

mass noun
  • 1Saliva running from the mouth.

    ‘slaver ran down from a corner of his mouth’
    • ‘Scholarly and distinguished-looking, he made a most unexpected slaver.’
    • ‘It was believed that serpents, coiling together in a wriggling, writhing mass, generated these glass or paste beads from their slaver and shot them into the air from their hissing jaws.’
    • ‘Then he lied motionlessly with slaver flowing out of his mouth.’
    • ‘A drip of his slaver splashed onto my chin and ran down my neck.’
  • 2archaic Excessive or obsequious flattery.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
Pronunciation /ˈslavə//ˈsleɪvə/
  • 1Let saliva run from the mouth.

    ‘the Labrador was slavering at the mouth’
    • ‘He started chewing the police car's tires, biting the bumper and generally snarling and slavering, trying to get at the cops, who chose to stay put with the windows rolled up.’
    • ‘They may be slavering for beer, but are they prepared to pay a fiver a pint?’
    • ‘Not one of them was staring at the tutor slavering and leaving long fingernail scratches down his desk.’
    • ‘It hadn't been in the script that I would have a man's life in my hands or, worse, that he would be slavering into my fingers.’
    • ‘Within a manner of half seconds, the wall exploded, and out from among the debris leapt a huge creature with slavering tusked jaws and mean yellow eyes.’
    • ‘It was ordered into a frontal attack as part of a botched tank offensive. As dawn broke, survivors staggered back, ‘haggard, bloodshot-eyed, slavering and rolling their bare-teethed heads’.’
    • ‘I hadn't been around ice cream trucks in a long time and I had forgotten the way they stopped whenever enough slavering children gathered round to make the wasteful idling of the engine economical.’
    • ‘And in the foreground, a gorilla and a gorilla-sized weta roar and slaver.’
    drool, slobber, dribble, salivate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Show excessive admiration or desire.
      ‘suburbanites slavering over drop-dead models’
      • ‘While there are those who slaver to bathe in the esteem of others, there are many who do not - especially those who have been taught that all praise and glory and blessing and honor belong to the Lamb of God alone.’
      • ‘You see, she had used up more litres of saliva than a cow per day, slavering at Brad.’
      • ‘So, how does it feel to have the men of New York slavering at your feet?’
      • ‘Hell, they slaver over the prospect of a kid falling down a well, or a local dog getting braces.’
      • ‘I don't even know why I'm bothering to post this; it's hardly a secret to anyone that media organizations are slavering over the prospect of war.’

Origin

Middle English: probably from Low German; compare with slobber.

Pronunciation

slaver

Noun/ˈslavə/

slaver

Verb/ˈslavə//ˈsleɪvə/