Main definitions of skive in English

: skive1skive2

skive1

verb

[NO OBJECT]British
informal
  • Avoid work or a duty by staying away or leaving early; shirk.

    ‘I skived off school’
    with object ‘she used to skive lessons’
    • ‘He had come back having skived off on his birthday, so the lads had made sure he'd stay there.’
    • ‘It doesn't seem to matter how old I am, driving away from the office at any time before 5: 30 pm always feels like skiving.’
    • ‘Children have been skiving off school for years.’
    • ‘I had said to myself that I would go to the gym after Dame G and Dr Sir T but I skived off and watched News 24 instead.’
    • ‘I always wondered what Wibbler got up to whilst apparently skiving from his blog duties.’
    • ‘In my own book I have included a chapter on skiving.’
    • ‘So we skived off for another cup of tea and I lent him my towel.’
    • ‘It was a warm, sunny Thursday and Belinda had skived off her unofficial work to join Astor for some sunbathing.’
    • ‘Truancy officers caught 154 children skiving between September and December last year, 42 of whom were with their parents.’
    • ‘I'm not completely skiving, though - Friday was sick leave, and today was a day of ‘education’ at a local ‘learning centre’.’
    • ‘He skived off quite a lot to go to band warm up session and meet people in the industry and it obviously paid off!’
    • ‘BA admits that not one single check-in worker has been disciplined in recent years for bunking off or skiving.’
    • ‘Then how do you know I skived off two other classes?’
    • ‘He won't be able to accuse me of having sold it on the black market and skived off with the proceeds.’
    • ‘If I hadn't skived off work early to go see, I'd have been angry at the waste of my time.’
    • ‘You think I skived off without blogging anything today, right?’
    • ‘I'm not sure what he was getting so upset about, but I think he was partly mad because some people had skived off the rehearsal.’
    • ‘Having said that, being a professional skiver, I have devised tactics, strategies and contingency plans to prolong skiving.’
    • ‘In the end, I skived off to a side street and made myself as inconspicuous as possible so I could get up to date.’
    • ‘But seeing as though you're reading this, you're probably already on first-name terms with office skiving.’
    malinger, pretend to be ill, fake illness, feign illness
    View synonyms

noun

British
informal
  • 1An instance of avoiding work or a duty by staying away or leaving early.

    • ‘There's a couple at work who I suspect think it was nothing but a skive, mind, but I fully expected that.’
    • ‘Yes, notwithstanding all of the above, I do love the odd skive on my tod.’
    • ‘The vast majority of the truants would readily acknowledge in the aftermath that they were only out for a skive following a wind-up on the web.’
    • ‘‘I decided to give blood because it was a good skive out of the railway and after you'd donated you got your free tea and biscuits,’ he said.’
    • ‘The train drivers must have called a strike, or a mass skive because of the heat.’
    • ‘Ebay is the most popular site for workers on the skive with four in ten admitting that they trawl the auction site while killing time at work.’
    1. 1.1 An easy option.
      • ‘Tuesday and yesterday were a bit brighter and we did have a bit of a skive on Tuesday.’
      • ‘The checkout girl had thought it was a good skive, especially as her break was almost due.’

Origin

Late 19th century (originally US college slang): probably from French esquiver ‘slink away’.

Pronunciation

skive

/skʌɪv/

Main definitions of skive in English

: skive1skive2

skive2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]technical
  • Pare (the edge of a piece of leather or other material) so as to reduce its thickness.

    ‘to join two ends of a strap, the ends are skived’
    • ‘Bitspower's skiving technique seems a great way to remove the thermal junction between base and fins.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from Old Norse skífa; related to shive.

Pronunciation

skive

/skʌɪv/