Main definitions of skip in English

: skip1skip2skip3

skip1

verb

  • 1[no object, with adverbial of direction] Move along lightly, stepping from one foot to the other with a hop or bounce.

    ‘she began to skip down the path’
    • ‘He gestured towards a small antelope skipping along parallel to us.’
    • ‘In a rush of sudden glee, he began to skip down the sidewalk.’
    • ‘He skipped down the sidewalk and opened the door to his mom's car.’
    • ‘The woman skipped down the steps until she was beside the two.’
    • ‘You know this is bull because you just saw Lisa skipping down the hallway.’
    • ‘She skipped down the hall, pulling on her pants at the same time.’
    • ‘Carlie shouted, and she jumped and skipped around the man in girlhood glee.’
    • ‘I yell at the frisky types skipping along the deep gold sand.’
    • ‘She blew a very flamboyant kiss his way, and she saw him blush before she practically skipped off.’
    • ‘Kit practically skipped up the stairs, causing Alan to smile softly to himself.’
    • ‘"Ok " HiKari said happily skipping out and grabbing her backpack.’
    • ‘She nodded and he nodded to the girl who skipped down the hall.’
    • ‘Mr Black bounced in, skipping like a four-year-old being taken to a party.’
    • ‘She skipped into the kitchen and took one chicken from the spit.’
    • ‘Clive Tyldesley growls randomly as Davids skips past a defender.’
    • ‘So I merrily skipped off to biology, thinking that there was absolutely nothing that could go wrong.’
    • ‘When she looked up she saw Molly giggling and skipping down the hallway.’
    • ‘Trailed by Sara, he skipped down the stairs and cautiously opened the door.’
    • ‘Kati whistled happily as she skipped down the sidewalk, walking her imaginary dog.’
    • ‘The leaves provide shelter or canopy and after a few days the little creatures find their feet and learn to skip and jump.’
    caper, prance, trip, dance, bound, jump, leap, spring, hop, bounce, gambol, frisk, romp, cavort, bob
    View synonyms
  • 2British [no object] Jump over a rope which is held at both ends by oneself or two other people and turned repeatedly over the head and under the feet, as a game or for exercise.

    ‘training was centred on running and skipping’
    • ‘Begin each lifting session with a 5 to 10 minute warm-up session by rope skipping.’
    • ‘Other traditional games such as skipping and marbles are also being brought back in other primary schools.’
    • ‘Twenty minutes of skipping is hard work, so I like to intersperse skipping with endurance exercises.’
    • ‘Other good bone-building exercises are skipping, aerobics and brisk walking.’
    • ‘Except for the rope skipping, all exercises are the same, so read the form tips in the intermediate workout.’
    • ‘Good exercises include running, skipping, aerobics, tennis, weight-training and brisk walking.’
    • ‘They skipped through hurried ropes without missing a beat while entering into little spaces as the ropes took different positions and angles.’
    1. 2.1North American [with object]Jump over (a rope that is being turned)
      ‘the younger girls had been skipping rope’
      • ‘One girl executes cool maneuvers on her own; but she is also skipping a large rope held by two pairs of pals, one stacked on the other.’
      • ‘In training for the fight, Liston had skipped rope interminably to Coleman Hawkins's ‘Night Train’.’
      • ‘It takes only three girls to skip rope or two to play house, while more boys are needed for team sports such as football.’
      • ‘The world's elite shadow boxed or skipped rope right next to them.’
      • ‘I can't skip rope worth a damn, so this is one of the first things they're way better at than I am.’
      • ‘The people in this school can't skip a rope even if it's lying on the floor.’
      • ‘I had to pretend not to know how to skip rope when, in real life, I was quite good at it.’
      • ‘She couldn't skip rope because it wasn't ladylike.’
    2. 2.2[with object]Jump lightly over.
      ‘the children used to skip the puddles’
      • ‘He skipped past two tackles to race into the area, but was foiled crucially at the last moment by Paddy Martin, the big Kilglass No.4.’
      • ‘Of course they must be fit and able to run and skip a tackle but all that stands for nothing if they don't know what to do with ball.’
  • 3[with object] Omit (part of a book that one is reading, or a stage in a sequence that one is following)

    ‘the video manual allows the viewer to skip sections he's not interested in’
    • ‘My heart practically skipped a beat and a wide grin spread across my face.’
    • ‘I could have sworn my heart just skipped a beat.’
    • ‘If you're not terribly interested, then skip ahead past the italics.’
    • ‘Some of the details presented of Jerry's career are skipped over.’
    • ‘Then skip ahead to tomorrow, friend, because today is the first day of the 58th Cannes Film Festival.’
    • ‘Be aware that those who connect through cable or DSL also skip the introduction, but not as often.’
    • ‘Christians may forgive, but this does not mean that whatever punishment is due to an evil doer must be skipped over.’
    • ‘I picked up another one, and my heart almost skipped a beat.’
    • ‘On the third ring, he answered and I skipped the greetings and immediately jumped to ‘Where are you?’’
    • ‘Poses may be repeated or skipped, but they should be done in the order given.’
    • ‘In fact, he nearly skipped the whole book, but for two or three pages at the end.’
    • ‘I'll skip right to the next interesting part; when my mom came home.’
    • ‘Adult Andrew Drury put in a near perfect performance that enabled him to jump a grade by skipping the yellow belt altogether and moving up to orange belt.’
    • ‘I was inhaling chapters and barely holding myself back from skipping to the end.’
    • ‘Of course we skip right to the Outcome, which is kind of ambiguous.’
    • ‘I got out my calculator and my math book and skipped over a song on my CD.’
    • ‘Let's skip straight to the end, shall we?’
    • ‘As with television, 45 % of online consumers would like to skip commercials easily.’
    • ‘When you felt your throat dry and a pit in your stomach, you had probably just skipped a meal.’
    • ‘I'm not giving away a lot of plot details, but if you're still playing the game I'd skip reading the next bit.’
    omit, leave out, miss out, dispense with, do without, pass over, bypass, skim over, steer clear of, disregard, ignore
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1[no object]Move quickly and in an unmethodical way from one point or subject to another.
      ‘Marian skipped half-heartedly through the book’
      • ‘Today's post could be accused of being without focus and skipping from one subject to the next.’
      • ‘Thus, what you get for your hard-earned then is an all too brief account, with highlights that skip too quickly from one sport to the next.’
      • ‘The verses are a number of independent statements that skip through different subjects.’
      • ‘Letters that list complaints or that skip from one subject to another are often rejected or heavily edited.’
      • ‘I was sure that he would act like most other boys and skip away from the deep subjects.’
      • ‘But even as he skips over subjects and themes, Kureishi has always returned to his own life for inspiration.’
      • ‘They had skipped from subject to subject, from music, to movies, to classes, to friends and family.’
  • 4[with object] Fail to attend or deal with as appropriate; miss.

    ‘I wanted to skip my English lesson to visit my mother’
    ‘try not to skip breakfast’
    • ‘‘Children who skip breakfast can find it difficult to concentrate in class,’ she said.’
    • ‘The next day I discovered that the ripple of excitement was apprehension for many people; namely those who had skipped work to attend.’
    • ‘Whatever you do, don't skip breakfast - even if your stomach is in knots.’
    • ‘So the family members used to eat in rotations, those who had lunch skipped the dinner and vice versa.’
    • ‘But with all of the food you guys provide us here, it's really no big deal to skip a meal or two.’
    • ‘The scheme involves pursuing those who skip bail and fail to turn up to a hearing after being released on bail.’
    • ‘If she keeps skipping meals, confide in your mom or a school counselor.’
    • ‘After all, some of them had to have skipped class to attend the sit-in.’
    • ‘This close observation of deceit caused her to skip her turn at jumprope.’
    • ‘Teams of officers are hunting them after they skipped bail and failed to attend court.’
    • ‘Your mother may have been wrong: skipping meals may be good for you.’
    • ‘She would have never skipped a class or snuck out at night for anyone.’
    • ‘As Train 20 passed into Alabama we skipped the first call for lunch and snacked in the cafe-lounge.’
    • ‘For any other parents out there reading this, I recommend skipping the above negotiation and waiting until they fall asleep.’
    • ‘Many people skip the traditional breakfast and lunch.’
    • ‘I was almost late for the bus, and I had to skip breakfast.’
    • ‘Even worse, skipping breakfast can lead to some diseases.’
    • ‘He'd been known to skip lectures and just attend tutes when he was a University student.’
    • ‘True, I was skipping first hour and standing right in the middle of the west wing hallway, but it was alright.’
    • ‘Skipping breakfast was easy: I just asked Wry to cover for me.’
    fail to attend, play truant from, miss, absent oneself from, take french leave from
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1informal [no object]Abandon an undertaking, conversation, or activity.
      ‘after several wrong turns in our journey, we almost decided to skip it’
      • ‘If I could, I would have skipped it, but unfortunately biology dictates.’
      • ‘I thought about StairMastering, but since my legs are a little sore from yesterday I skipped it.’
      • ‘I wasn't going to skip it after going through the whole semester and doing all the work.’
      • ‘And I haven't skipped it in ages, so I think it'll be ok.’
      • ‘And this just kind of wipes out Congress' intent in law and just skips it.’
      • ‘I've gotten tickets to SonicFest 2005 tonight but I am contemplating skipping it.’
      • ‘Besides, beating myself up isn't working and it doesn't feel good, so I'm skipping it for now.’
      • ‘He had been investing all his life, but when he had the best investment opportunity ever, he skipped it.’
      • ‘You can skip it and just take my word that it is extreme.’
      • ‘So, with a bitter sense of disappointment that still lingers to this day, I skipped it.’
    2. 4.2informal [no object]Run away; disappear.
      ‘I'm not giving them a chance to skip off again’
      • ‘But as soon as he decides to skip off to another country to make a movie, everyone decides that they actually liked Woody Allen all along.’
      • ‘It seems that it is a bit of a tradition among graduates to skip off overseas and teach English, and why not?’
      • ‘We walk together, slowly, allowing the others to skip off.’
      • ‘So the vacuous Shoreditchers inevitably skip off into the sunset together with that Winkleman terror snapping at their heels.’
      • ‘Your parents aren't going to let you skip off and become a peasant.’
      • ‘Are the Germans really going to skip off into the dusk, like the Italians did, and leave the Spanish to sweep up all the riches Europe has to offer?’
      • ‘She had often told others that they would be the ones to skip off and leave her; they would be the ones to ignore her over the boy.’
    3. 4.3informal Depart quickly and secretly from.
      ‘she skipped her home amid rumours of a romance’
      • ‘It's not even that I secretly skip the horrid hair washing bath night.’
      • ‘Once out, he skipped town, missing his court appearance.’
      • ‘Well he did intend to but couldn't think how to so the thought quickly skipped his mind.’
  • 5[with object] Throw (a stone) so that it ricochets off the surface of water.

    ‘they skipped stones across the creek’
    • ‘As he watches the older kids showing the younger ones how to skip stones, his voice softens.’
    • ‘But this tendency can be a flat stone skipped over deep water and crucial insights.’
    • ‘And Morgan suddenly became very conscious of the fact he had been skipping stones like a ten-year-old boy.’
    • ‘Daniel laughed, brushed a piece of his blond hair from his eyes, and tried to skip another stone on the cobbles.’
    • ‘Chiha and Kohibi came to visit her often; she played with them on off times, and taught Kohibi how to skip rocks.’
    • ‘Lars taught me to skip rocks, and soon I was better than he was, much to his chagrin.’
    • ‘After that, they just hung out by the beach and talked, skipping rocks across the shallow surface of the water.’
    • ‘She stood and cracked her back, replying nonchalantly as she skipped stones.’
    • ‘Wolf skipped a flat stone across the surface, shattering the mirror.’
    • ‘As we smoked and talked, Mike and I would skip flat rocks across the stream below the bridge.’
    • ‘Elsa and I greedily drank from the stream while Rowen sat on a bank, and skipped stones across the water.’
    • ‘I skip a rock across the blog ocean - it skips three pretty times across the waves, and comes to rest below the surface of a blog.’
    • ‘It was different from how one threw daggers, or stones, or much of anything else; it vaguely resembled skipping a rock.’
    • ‘She was trying to skip stones, and wasn't having much luck.’
    • ‘The entire play is like skipping stones across the surface of a story - there's no substance.’
    • ‘He looked up at the dragon after throwing a few stones, skipping them a few times over the water, and licked his lips.’
    • ‘The boys skipped stones at every watery spot we found.’
    • ‘She and her friends had been having a contest to see who could make a stone skip the most when Miree had found it.’
    • ‘Melanie and Eon were at the beach, just staring at the bay and skipping rocks across its surface.’
    • ‘Vincent commented as he watched Pearl trying to skip rocks on the water.’
    throw, toss, fling, cast, pitch
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A light, bouncing step; a skipping movement.

    ‘he moved with a strange, dancing skip’
    • ‘With a slight skip in her step she too leaves the room.’
    • ‘He turned with a skip and shambled away, whistling.’
    • ‘The only mode of transportation she seemed to have was a bouncing skip.’
    • ‘She uttered thanks again and walked swiftly from the stables, a skip in her already jaunty step.’
    • ‘Spend time doing things that put a skip in your step, a grin on your face, some glory in your life story.’
    • ‘She rises and descends with natural ease and skips through a complicated chorus full of rich imagery.’
    • ‘No more than eight years old he walks briskly with a slight skip in his step past the monument towards the houses beyond.’
    • ‘I pulled round and left with what can only be described as a skip in my step.’
    • ‘Still dressed in that red jumpsuit, slim even for her young age, she ran with a skip like a child prancing through a field of daisies.’
    • ‘Ed had a little skip in his pace, which only added to the glee in him.’
    • ‘She walked to school that morning with a slight skip in her step.’
    • ‘Fall is the season when you come alive, and right now the equinox is putting a frisky skip in your step.’
    • ‘Shannon noticed a slight skip in his step and laughed to herself.’
    • ‘My chest is puffed out regularly and there is a skip in my step.’
    • ‘It was as if everyone in the world had a skip to their step today, and it was contagious, as good moods often are.’
    • ‘Put a skip in your step by skipping out for a lunch time walk.’
    • ‘One Twinkie found a home in my chest pocket, while the other I held out in front of me as I followed out the door, a spry little skip in my step.’
    • ‘She smiled at this action and walked away with a slight skip in her step and I stifled a laugh.’
  • 2Computing
    An act of passing over part of a sequence of data or instructions.

    • ‘You will, however, notice some animation jumps and skips based on certain commands.’
    • ‘There are no skips in the other two instruments.’
    • ‘You might expect that a PCI-based tuner would deliver smoother video and recordings with fewer skips than an external device.’
    • ‘Recording is prone to skips if you use your computer heavily while it's recording.’
  • 3North American informal A person who is missing, especially one who has defaulted on a debt.

Origin

Middle English: probably of Scandinavian origin.

Pronunciation:

skip

/skɪp/

Main definitions of skip in English

: skip1skip2skip3

skip2

noun

  • 1British A large transportable open-topped container for building and other refuse.

    ‘I've salvaged a carpet from a skip’
    • ‘The council may be able to assist those involved by providing skips, refuse sacks, gloves and litter pickers.’
    • ‘We had to hire skips to put all the damaged property in.’
    • ‘Anyone who needs a refuse skip for their waste will see the benefits immediately.’
    • ‘After they left, hotel staff found a black duffel bag in a rubbish skip.’
    • ‘While building work is under way space around the building is needed for scaffolding and skips.’
    • ‘Bradford council workmen swept up the broken glass and rubble before shouldering it into skips to be taken away.’
    • ‘A large skip was filled with waste and the excrement was separately treated and disposed of.’
    • ‘Rubbish littered the site, along with burned-out cars and refuse skips, huge piles of Tarmac and garden rubbish and gas cylinders.’
    • ‘And it costs £40 to empty the skip, which happens at least once a week.’
    • ‘The provision of toilets and a rubbish skip is being considered.’
    • ‘Carrying heavy bags of rubbish up steel steps to tip over the waist height edge of the skip cannot be safe.’
    • ‘Arriving in the town itself, the taxi manoeuvres around skips and building equipment, evidence that developers are moving in.’
    • ‘The Council sponsored a skip container which was placed outside the graveyard.’
    • ‘A friend of his managed to salvage four of them from the rubbish skip and returned them.’
    • ‘We pay 200 per week to empty the skip.’
    • ‘Supplying waste skips and filling of same with rubbish thrown out from flood damaged shops.’
    • ‘The skip containers will be used mainly for garden refuse and rubbish which does not generally fit in the normal green drums.’
    • ‘Laois County Council may provide skips, refuse sacks, gloves and litter packs if required.’
    • ‘He should see the recycling skips near Bingley law courts.’
  • 2A cage or bucket in which men or materials are lowered and raised in mines and quarries.

    • ‘The excavator had been lowering a skip to the bottom of the hole when it tipped over the edge and tumbled down.’
    • ‘The driver of the skip lorry was taken to Hope Hospital with minor leg injuries.’
    • ‘A skip being lowered from a crane was seen to come close to the group of men laying tiles.’
    • ‘The excavator was sitting at the top of the hole, so it could lower a skip down for the mini digger to fill, when it toppled over.’
    1. 2.1
      variant spelling of skep

Pronunciation:

skip

/skɪp/

Main definitions of skip in English

: skip1skip2skip3

skip3

noun

  • The captain or director of a side at bowls or curling.

    • ‘As the players bend into their stances and play, the skips employ a variety of hand signals, looking not unlike third-base coaches at times.’
    • ‘Not once did the seconds step on to the mat until they had received instructions from their skip as to what she wanted them to do.’
    • ‘Teams of four players termed rinks are led by the skip, as in bowls.’
    • ‘Who, outside devotees of the sport, could name the skip of the women's curling team before this year's Winter Olympics?’
    • ‘An inability to act on instructions from the skip can be damaging to team morale, and can be the foundation of doubt and dissension.’
    • ‘If you are having trouble handling one side, ask the skip if you can play the other side to see if it gives you better results.’
    • ‘‘Whitea’ with skip Volkmar Petzold won the first race that day in the fun cruising class.’
    • ‘Desert Rats carried on their hundred percent winning streak by beating the Buriram Stompers captained by their new skip Phil.’
    • ‘Returning to the women's side, skip Marika Bakewell was voted by her curling peers as the all-star skip for the tournament.’
    • ‘Still, the Dodger skip delighted in watching the writer's gaffes.’
    • ‘How often do you see a side holding four or five shots when the opposing skip, with his/her last bowl, draws the shot?’
    • ‘The opposing skip then played his last shot with weight to try to move the York wood but missed, meaning York took the game 75-74.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Act as skip of (a side)

    ‘they lost to another Stranraer team, skipped by Peter Wilson’
    • ‘Smith, a previous QSG captain, was this season handed the task of skipping the Gulf International side.’
    • ‘The tournament was first played here in 1984 and fittingly the inaugural winner was Border's Hamiltons, skipped by Alma Watt.’
    • ‘Kevin and Kitty Phillips played well against strong opposition skipped by SA representative Rudi Jacobs.’
    • ‘In a section four game yesterday afternoon former Springbok Judy Armist's St Andrew's team battled it out with the Strand team skipped by L Logan.’
    • ‘Today the Scots play the Swiss Olympic team skipped by Luzia Erbrother.’
    • ‘Ball's victory in the fours final earlier in the year was also against a side skipped by Lavelle.’

Origin

Early 19th century (originally Scots): abbreviation of skipper.

Pronunciation:

skip

/skɪp/