Definition of sit something out in English:

sit something out

phrasal verb

  • 1Not take part in a particular event or activity.

    ‘he had to sit out Sheffield Wednesday's UEFA Cup game’
    • ‘If the instance is bad enough, a player may sit out a game.’
    • ‘Some (potential top picks) decide to sit out a game like this and not risk an injury.’
    • ‘When a player sits out the entire game, the scene afterwards at home can be pretty ugly.’
    • ‘The suspensions range from one to three games, with Wisconsin choosing which players will sit out which games.’
    • ‘He has started a record 125 straight games and isn't about to sit one out any time soon.’
    • ‘The guy comes back after sitting out several games and immediately starts shooting every time he touches the ball.’
    • ‘Each time he has come back this season after sitting out a few games, he has looked unusually active.’
    • ‘When Johnson refused to restore Cobb, the players sat out the next game, in Philadelphia.’
    • ‘Not wanted to compete against his homeland, Tim Duncan sat out yesterday's game.’
    • ‘Let Davis sit out two games for every one he plays.’
    1. 1.1 Wait without moving or taking action until a particular unwelcome situation or process is over.
      ‘most of the workers seem to be sitting the crisis out, waiting to see what will happen’
      • ‘After calling his wife he said: ‘All I can do is sit it out and wait until the Tube and buses get going again.’’
      • ‘Overnight a bit of a storm started ripping up and we thought we'd better wait, sit it out here until the storm abates.’
      • ‘Hardaway tried to play in January but scored just 39 points in four games before deciding to sit out because of persistent pain in his knee.’
      • ‘He appeared in just 22 games, sitting out the final 41 with a strained right rotator cuff.’
      • ‘Many ladies entirely spoil the sit of the skirts by retaining the usual impedimenta of petticoats.’
      • ‘I thought we could sit it out until it calmed down at home, and we would go back.’
      • ‘So, why not sit things out, and wait for the next generation of leaders?’
      • ‘The council hopes to sit the strike out until the summer holiday shutdown.’
      • ‘‘It's OK,’ I told myself. ‘I can sit it out until the end of the line.’’
      • ‘Badly swollen, Nadia sat out apparatus after apparatus during team optionals.’