Definition of shred in English:

shred

noun

usually shreds
  • 1A strip of material, such as paper, cloth, or food, that has been torn, cut, or scraped from something larger.

    ‘her dress was torn to shreds’
    • ‘Its wooing of such a company, in the eyes of many, shredded public confidence in the agency.’
    • ‘The very fabric of modern society rent asunder, all we hold dear torn to shreds and flushed down the lavatory.’
    • ‘The policeman noted that there were multiple pieces of the curtains torn to shreds.’
    • ‘Rick curled his lip in disgust, slumped in a corner a body, torn to shreds by shrapnel and bullet wounds.’
    • ‘I assume your values are against seeing people torn to shreds by car bombs.’
    • ‘By the sides of the road, triangular signs warned us presence of wind socks, but those that we saw had been torn to shreds by the Atlantic gale, and so posed no risk to anyone.’
    • ‘The federal Liberals have been more responsible for shredding the social safety net than any other government.’
    • ‘The feathers came from Kathy's parka, torn to shreds.’
    • ‘The first half saw the Waterford defence torn to shreds with just Karl O'Keeffe and Paul Houlihan keeping the home side in the game at times.’
    • ‘His nerves could easily have been torn to shreds following a series of false starts which led to the Greek being disqualified.’
    • ‘This paper is not exhaustive and has only covered some of the areas in which the Constitution has been violated and its ideology torn to shreds.’
    • ‘The hard copies have often been torn to shreds, but if a poem made it to my web site it has usually remained.’
    • ‘At the film's end, Harry is left alone in his destroyed apartment, torn to shreds in a vain search for a planted microphone.’
    • ‘Yet the real battle for England is hoping its cricket revival is not going to be torn to shreds in this game by a rampant Aussie team who simply refuse to show any mercy to the old enemy.’
    • ‘At one point, the flags were literally torn to shreds.’
    • ‘Her heart ached as the coldness gripped her and tore the dress to pieces, only shreds of innocent cloth lingering between her forsaken fingers.’
    • ‘What kind of sport is it that accepts one animal being torn to shreds by another?’
    • ‘In death, Dorris's reputation was torn to shreds.’
    • ‘The hunter is doomed to being transformed by the vain goddess of hunting into a stag, to be pursued and torn to shreds by his own hounds.’
    • ‘We want the British constitution torn to shreds and reformulated in the interests of working people.’
    • ‘A hare is be given a short head start to blaze a trail, marking his devious way with shreds of paper, soon to be pursued by a shouting pack of harriers.’
    • ‘Bits of dog harness torn to shreds were scattered about.’
    • ‘Most cities had been leveled, economies were shattered, resources completely depleted, and societies torn to shreds.’
    • ‘‘They weren't eaten, there was no sign of a hungry animal here, they were just torn to shreds by dogs looking for fun,’ says James.’
    • ‘They found his robes all torn to shreds in one of the upper levels.’
    • ‘Tear one of the shreds of licorice off the big licorice stick.’
    • ‘The form-book has certainly been torn to shreds in the play-off stages of this fascinating intermediate championship.’
    • ‘The waves fling themselves at my feet, water torn to shreds - white ribbons thrown across the rocks.’
    • ‘The form book was torn to shreds, however, at Walsh Park on Saturday as the Carrickbeg men totally outplayed a ragged Dunhill side to clinch their semi-final place.’
    tatter, scrap, strip, ribbon, rag, snippet, snip, remnant, fragment, sliver, splinter, chip, bit, tiny bit, piece, tiny piece, wisp
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    1. 1.1often with negative A very small amount.
      ‘we have not a shred of evidence to go on’
      • ‘There is hardly a shred of human feeling or emotion in anything he does or believes in (aside from the numerous internal political battles he has engaged in to get to where he is today).’
      • ‘If that Vallee fellow had a shred of dignity, he'd discard his ukulele and take up the foghorn.’
      • ‘To date, however, there is not a shred of credible evidence to support the belief that ETs have already visited us.’
      • ‘They lay stark naked, without a shred of dignity or decency in death.’
      • ‘There's still a shred of dignity to be salvaged there, I think.’
      • ‘‘Even in England, where Lisa was born, there has been hardly a shred of coverage about her murder,’ she said.’
      • ‘The courage to go out in public with at least a shred of dignity.’
      • ‘In order to retain a shred of dignity, therefore, you should do as little work as possible while pretending to work.’
      • ‘This feat did not cost $4,000, and it left us with a shred of dignity.’
      • ‘That there is not a shred of evidence to suggest that the cyclist is taking, or has taken, drugs does not seem to count.’
      • ‘The others would have joined him if they didn't still retain a shred of dignity, but all the same, they were immensely relieved to be back on solid ground, some more than others.’
      • ‘If they could just say, ‘We made a heck of a mistake, we caused untold misery,’ they could at least come away with a shred of dignity, but they will never do that.’
      • ‘The shows are filled with PhD's and experts claiming this and that with hardly a shred of real truth brought to the fore.’
      • ‘Mortified by the embarrassment of this mistaken identity, I log off and retire to bed early to consider whether there's any possible way to turn this ridiculous situation around with a shred of dignity.’
      • ‘I like to say that I dumped him of course, because that way I at least get to keep a shred of dignity.’
      • ‘I tipped my head back and straightened my shoulders, trying to maintain a shred of dignity, but my attempts were futile.’
      • ‘The drubbing is so complete that any filmmaker with even a shred of dignity would never pick up a camera without mounting a serious counter rebuttal.’
      • ‘If it's a ‘rivalry’ match-up, there's the chance he may halt it in a tie and leave 32,000 fans with a shred of dignity.’
      • ‘Idi's out of a coma, possibly blind, possibly brain-damaged, certainly in intense discomfort from renal failure, and without a shred of human dignity.’
      • ‘But not a shred of evidence has ever been produced to suggest, for example, that our intelligence service is not under the control of the government.’
      scrap, bit, tiny amount, speck, iota, particle, ounce, whit, jot, atom, molecule, crumb, morsel, fragment, grain, drop, hint, touch, trace, suggestion, whisper, suspicion, scintilla, spot, mite, tittle, jot or tittle, modicum
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1with object Tear or cut into shreds.

    • ‘How they all seem so cool and brave, but each of them is nervously shredding the labels on their beer.’
    • ‘The garden shredder also aids in shredding debris from punning your hedges.’
    • ‘Anyhow, I ducked out earlier to plant the new arrivals before the cats shredded them in their packaging.’
    • ‘They are shredded and used again to surface playgrounds and horse training tracks.’
    • ‘Corsham Town Council is opposing a landowner who wants to use his industrial land for shredding motor tyres.’
    • ‘In a small bowl mix the juice of the lime with the fish sauce, sugar and the very finely shredded lime leaves.’
    • ‘All of the recycled trees will be shredded and turned into mulch, which will be used to fertilise woodlands in the region.’
    • ‘You place them into a box and no sooner is your back turned than they've shredded the box and disappeared.’
    • ‘It will then be shredded and spread across the borough's parks to suppress weeds and put nutrients back into the soil.’
    • ‘I looked closer and it ended up being that half the fan belt had shredded itself and torn off.’
    • ‘You may want to consider shredding the leaves and use it as winter mulch.’
    • ‘The cabbage was shredded and packed in layers with salt, juniper and barberries, pepper, and spices.’
    • ‘Timber would be shredded to produce wood chips for the production of mulch, chipboard or compost.’
    • ‘They will be taken to a waste site in Bury where they will be shredded and prepared as compost for farmland across Lancashire.’
    • ‘I run my tongue over it gently, shredding it before grinding it between my well-developed teeth.’
    • ‘I poked it gently with the knife, even though I could see that it had been shredded, it had given its life for the family.’
    • ‘After delivery to the nursery it is shredded, and then stacked in long piles in an adjacent glasshouse.’
    • ‘When I met the other guys for the first time I nervously shredded two beer coasters.’
    • ‘The tender inside leaves can be shredded finely for tasty salads and braised red cabbage is fantastic.’
    • ‘The skin of the oranges is peeled and the peels are shredded into small pieces.’
    chop finely, cut up, tear up, rip up, grate, rub into pieces, mince, mangle, chew, macerate, grind, granulate, pulverize
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Reduce documents to unreadable strips by feeding them into a shredder.
      ‘executives have shredded key documents’
      • ‘We receive a certificate to show the date that the documents were shredded.’
      • ‘He has also raised questions over whether e-mails were deleted or documents shredded.’
      • ‘Fortunately, most firms now make a habit of shredding documents they no longer need.’
      • ‘Shred unwanted paperwork such as bank statements, credit card receipts, council tax and utility bills before throwing them away.’
      • ‘They took my identification papers and started to shred them.’
      • ‘Also, do not throw or shred non-confidential documents that have been read.’
      • ‘Statements and related receipts being discarded after the retention period should be shredded or otherwise destroyed.’
      • ‘A recent report has found that two thirds of us now regularly shred or destroy personal documents, and 12% take extra care when using the internet.’
      • ‘Deleting e-mail is like shredding documents - it destroys evidence forever.’
      • ‘Shred all important papers especially anything with names or banking information on it.’
  • 2usually as noun shreddingno object Play a very fast, intricate style of rock lead guitar.

    ‘we want to hear everything from country and western to blisteringly fast guitar shredding’
    • ‘I was impressed at how you can revive the 80's guitar shredding days without altering a thing.’
    • ‘Shredding his way through gems such as "Three Days," " Been Caught Stealing "and current single" Just Because, " he showed why he is considered to be one of the top guitarists in the rock genre.’
    • ‘Screaming and shredding are cathartic, yes, but nothing says sensitive like an acoustic guitar.’
    • ‘John Bonham rips apart the drums, Robert Plant sings his patented sexual style of the blues, Jimmy Page shreds on that double guitar and John Paul Jones keeps it all together with a rock-solid bass line.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the eviscerated shredding he applies in "Hallelujah!" engages initially for its novelty, but grows tiresome over repeated listenings.’
    • ‘Dime was an incredible musician and person who influenced thousands of guitarists and pushed guitar shredding to a higher degree for many years.’
    • ‘Tony was in a band called The Ninth Plague and basically shreds on the guitar.’
    • ‘She won a few hearts from the male fans when she shredded out some righteous guitar solos.’
    • ‘Several overlapping vocals are thrown over a punky guitar that shreds quickly over repeated cymbal crashes in the background.’
    • ‘The rest blends together into an indistinct mass of guitar and vocal shredding.’

Phrases

  • in shreds

    • Very badly damaged; destroyed or ruined.

      ‘my reputation will be in shreds’
      • ‘All over England, removal vans are probably circling, followed by weeping homeless persons, their hopes in shreds.’
      • ‘Smoked duck breast from Ilan County is cut in shreds.’
      • ‘In a searing attack, Conservative leader said the Prime Minister's credibility lay in shreds.’
      • ‘In Bulawayo, police last week discovered several thousand Z $500 notes, mysteriously lying in shreds on a rubbish tip.’
      • ‘Political posters were torn in shreds, property damaged.’
      • ‘A French cabinet minister once branded him a " personality in shreds ".’
      • ‘Poor conditions cause injuries, as do the terrible shoes they wear until they are in shreds.’
      • ‘I left the department store with my budget intact, but my Christmas spirit in shreds.’
      • ‘The once effective Unemployment Insurance programme is in shreds.’
      • ‘With the French president's ambitious plans for a cohesive, more centralised European Union in shreds, Ireland can take a bow.’
  • tear someone/something to shreds

    • informal Criticize someone or something aggressively.

      ‘a defence counsel would tear his evidence to shreds’
      • ‘There's a moment where everyone is just deconstructing the song, tearing it to pieces, which was the point of what we were doing this time.’
      • ‘In all the years I have attended, I have never seen a lecturer torn to pieces like that.’
      • ‘I suspect that every Opposition MP would give his or her eye teeth at the moment to listen in on a Labour Party caucus that is tearing itself to pieces.’
      • ‘There is almost nobody in this town who is not tearing him to pieces, said a congressional aide.’
      • ‘The next quarter Cupido came on and went absolutely ga-ga and tore the opposition to pieces.’
      • ‘The pair are drawn into China's struggle, as nationalists, communists and warlords tear each other to pieces and Japan lurks in the shadows, waiting to pounce.’
      • ‘All because of a bold and sporty declaration by Sobers for which he was torn to pieces by the press.’
      • ‘In this country we tend to either over praise someone, before knocking them down, or we just tear them to pieces straight away.’
      • ‘For Kierkegaard, the god torn to pieces is Christ, a transcendent God who has come down into the world.’
      • ‘How do you get to the point where you can create something without wanting to tear it to pieces five seconds later?’

Origin

Late Old English scrēad ‘piece cut off’, scrēadian ‘trim, prune’, of West Germanic origin; related to shroud.

Pronunciation

shred

/ʃrɛd/