Main definitions of shingle in English

: shingle1shingle2

shingle1

noun

mass noun
  • A mass of small rounded pebbles, especially on a seashore.

    ‘a wonderful beach of fine shingle’
    as modifier ‘natural features like sand dunes and shingle banks’
    • ‘Probable reasons for this disappearance are a change in climate and more importantly, an increase in human disturbance on their breeding haunts of shingle beaches.’
    • ‘There are shingle beaches where grayling spawn, rattling rapids and wooded islands that spread wide the flow.’
    • ‘In Norfolk they are to be seen most regularly in the neighbourhood of Cley and Blakeney, on the landward slopes of shingle banks and on rough grassy ground behind.’
    • ‘Mostly it's sand, sometimes a fine shingle, sometimes pebbles of every hue, and here and there flat shale for skimming the waves.’
    • ‘The gradients associated with these profiles also vary between sand and shingle beaches, the latter being generally steeper.’
    • ‘The action takes place against a bank of shingle, representing a Cornish beach, and the design is almost monochrome - perhaps seeking to evoke the success of the movie.’
    • ‘The seabed here is made up of heavy granite pebbles and shingle, so the visibility is often very good.’
    • ‘The shingle banks were wonderful, like frozen waves perhaps six feet from trough to crest; you could walk along a trough as it were beneath the landscape, invisible.’
    • ‘The tide has driven multitudes of waders onto the shell and shingle banks, where a long line of roosting birds shuffles restlessly.’
    • ‘They'll settle for shingle banks with light weed growth and this tends to be the type of ground they are feeding over when you're fishing off steep sandy beaches.’
    • ‘Also look for shingle banks, areas of mixed mud and stony ground that holds numbers of dabs, and the ends of headlands that jut out to sea where a tide race forms.’
    • ‘Green turtles can be observed in the waters from July to the end of September, when they come ashore to nest on the sand and shingle beaches on the island's eastern side.’
    • ‘I find soft, powdery sand, hard sand, loose shingle banks and a couple of streams.’
    • ‘The Rio Gallegos provides perfect spawning beds through small pea shingle pebbles, while the lack of large rocks means there are few obstacles to the Sea Trout migrating upstream.’
    • ‘Descending the shotline the Brighton emerged at around 40m on a sand and shingle seabed at 48m.’
    • ‘What would happen if the sand or shingle was too fine to allow the movement of vehicles on the beaches?’
    • ‘The favoured stretch of shingle beach and marram was again fenced off.’
    • ‘There were also sand dunes and shingle banks that were later used for building roads in the new town.’
    • ‘Most of the Thames Bank is shingle and stone so sand is relatively rare.’
    • ‘And we use the foreshore for seaweed, sand and shingle.’
    seaside, seashore, shore, coast, coastline, coastal region, seaboard, foreshore, water's edge, margin
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

shingle

/ˈʃɪŋɡ(ə)l/

Main definitions of shingle in English

: shingle1shingle2

shingle2

noun

  • 1A rectangular wooden tile used on walls or roofs.

    • ‘If your house originally had wooden shingles, maybe a brown colored asphalt shingle would work best.’
    • ‘Check that your roof isn't missing any shingles, tiles, slates or nails.’
    • ‘Roof tiles or shingles decorate buildings in the Harley where none existed previously.’
    • ‘Solar shingles and roofing tiles now can serve as both roof and electric generators.’
    • ‘Roofs may be covered with tiles, wooden shingles, or zinc sheets.’
    • ‘Remove enough of the roof shingles, tiles, gravel, or other roofing material down to the tar paper.’
    • ‘By 1994 the exterior siding was installed and the roof shingles were complete.’
    • ‘Consider natural roofing alternatives, such as slate or tile, or high-tech shingles made with recycled materials.’
    • ‘Seal flashing around roof stacks and vents, between roof valley flashing and shingles, and around roof additions and skylights.’
    • ‘It is advantageous in that it protects the waterproofing from damage by ultraviolet radiation, and precludes the need for tiles or other shingles.’
    • ‘There are also pre-fabricated, light-colored tiles, shingles or metal sheets to replace old roof materials.’
    • ‘Ice dams will force moisture under roof shingles where it can drip into the attic or walls.’
    • ‘Traditional rural houses have roofs of red tiles, corrugated tin, or wooden shingles.’
    • ‘Composite or fiberglass shingles is the most common roofing now in use.’
    • ‘So far, the recycled products include, among others, plastic railroad ties, construction sheeting and roof shingles.’
    • ‘On the exterior, they replaced the fiberglass wall shingles with stained cedar shakes and put in oversized, divided-light windows.’
    • ‘They also replaced the house's aging brown-shingle roof with black shingles for house and porch.’
    • ‘Because of the short lifespan of the shingles, they are slowly being replaced by galvanized metal roof sheets.’
    • ‘Treated wood shingles may leach toxic preservatives, and asphalt shingles may leach small amounts of petroleum compounds.’
    • ‘Constructed with fire retardant cedar roof shingles and exterior walls made of rough-hewn lumber, it is the quintessential ski retreat.’
  • 2dated A woman's short haircut in which the hair tapers from the back of the head to the nape of the neck.

  • 3North American A small signboard, especially one found outside a doctor's or lawyer's office.

    • ‘So, I'll leave my shingle hanging outside this virtual stoop a while longer.’
    • ‘The shingle on his door says that he is a Jungian analyst.’
    • ‘But he was never the small-time lawyer, with only a desk and a shingle, that some made him out to be.’
    • ‘This is my only reason for justifying the shingle hanging outside in the boulevard.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Roof or clad with shingles.

    ‘a tower surmounted by a shingled spire’
    • ‘The guy who poured the concrete knew he was better at concrete than the guys who installed the cabinets who knew they were better at carpentry than the guy who shingled the roof.’
    • ‘So, after two years and $1.4 billion of preparation this is where we're at: a bunch of skilled scientists doing the outer-space equivalent of shingling a roof.’
    • ‘Equally lovely was the modest farmhouse itself; its wooden walls were painted alabaster and its brown roof was shingled with wide, ridged tiles.’
    • ‘Steep cliffs behind the field are shingled with carbonate.’
    • ‘It was log cabin style, as all of ours were, but the roof was shingled with crumbling slate, a pattern that resembled dragons scales.’
    • ‘The roof was shingled with maroon tiles, and the chimney was made mostly of red brick.’
    • ‘I shingled it all over and made one half a rose garden, which were her favourite flowers, and decorated the rest with the ornaments.’
    • ‘A small wood shingled A frame, it was solidly encased by trees, hidden from view.’
    • ‘Once the flat planes of the roof have been shingled, you will need to apply the hip shingles, if you have a hip roof, which will be overlapped by the ridge shingles.’
    • ‘Clad externally in stainless steel panels at the street and a silver grey terracotta shingled rainscreen above, the windows vary in size.’
    • ‘Now, thanks to advances in photovoltaic technology, it's possible to shingle your roof with solar tiles.’
    • ‘Hell, if the guy wanted me to, I'd shingle his roof for an extra hundred bucks.’
    • ‘The roof was shingled with Lake Superior Cedar and indulged in galvanized iron trimmings.’
    • ‘Scrolls of smoke unfurled from three stone chimneys set amidst steep shingled gables.’
    • ‘The outside, barely seen by the light of the eerie street lamps, was old and darkly shingled, with a thatched roof, and a smoking chimney.’
    • ‘Exterior walls are shingled, except at the taller central-garden facade, where contrasting white-painted wood siding calls attention to the home's addition.’
    • ‘Other features that reinforce the mudroom's indoor-outdoor feeling are shingled interior walls and a radiant-heated slate-tile floor.’
    • ‘Finally the grader came along and levelled and shingled the road.’
    • ‘The inn is a collection of four shingled buildings, each uniquely configured with three or four rooms connected to one another by paths through native gardens of salal and rhododendron.’
    • ‘I had played there when I was little, and took care to keep the roof shingled after Jane and I moved in.’
  • 2dated Cut (a woman's hair) in a shingle.

    ‘women began to bob their hair immediately after the war and were shingling it by 1925’
    • ‘He had taken a liking to my mother, who looked more forward than she was, with her shingled hair and very short skirt showing a lot of silk stocking.’
    • ‘My hair is shingled, and the longest strands are about nine inches long.’
    • ‘And although shingled hair was wildly popular in the period, it still seems to have connoted rejection of traditional relationships.’

Phrases

  • hang out one's shingle

    • Begin to practise a profession.

      ‘a license to hang out their shingle as a financial adviser’
      • ‘‘Everything was great,’ she says of life before hanging out her shingle in 1999.’
      • ‘He hung out his shingle in 1988 and has never been a member of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers because they do not represent his interests.’
      • ‘The Los Angeles Angels hung out their shingle to little fanfare in 1961 as an American League expansion franchise.’
      • ‘After that, he hung out his shingle as a consultant.’
      • ‘He carted them all back to his rent-stabilized walk-up on the Upper East Side and hung out his shingle in 1983.’
      • ‘We should be able to hang out our shingle like any other professional.’
      • ‘Those who hang out their shingle without this knowledge, perpetrate the myth that skill acquisition is not necessary.’
      • ‘He negotiated a good lease, and hung out his shingle in an upscale neighborhood.’
      • ‘In mid-2001, Lucy again hung out her shingle and offered psychiatric help for five cents.’
      • ‘Any would-be US candidate hangs out their shingle in the resigned knowledge that the opposing dirt unit will go like hell, as would theirs.’
      work at, pursue a career in, have a career in, go in for, engage in, specialize in, ply, follow
      View synonyms
  • a shingle short

    • informal (of a person) stupid or slightly mad.

      ‘he reacted in a manner which clearly showed that he was a shingle short’
      • ‘I'm afraid my grandson is a shingle short.’
      • ‘You must be a shingle short to ask what he's about!’
      • ‘He had had to undergo a lot of abuse, and his fellow-dairymen had looked upon him as a man who was a shingle short.’
      • ‘This lad was regarded in the town as being called 'a shingle short'.’
      • ‘I'm not keen on someone who's a shingle short living so close to my kids.’

Origin

Middle English (as a noun): apparently from Latin scindula, earlier scandula ‘a split piece of wood’.

Pronunciation

shingle

/ˈʃɪŋɡ(ə)l/