Definition of shield fern in English:

shield fern


  • Any of a number of ferns that have circular shield-like scales protecting the spore cases.

    • ‘This is in contrast to its look-alike, P. setiferum, the soft shield fern.’
    • ‘Marginal shield fern is an evergreen fern, which grows as a non-spreading, vase-shaped clump with handsome gray-green, leathery fronds.’
    • ‘I've had some southern shield fern for a few years now.’
    • ‘On your way into one of the canyons keep an eye open for the lady ferns and shield ferns in the shaded understory of the forest.’
    • ‘Cinnamon, royal, and southern shield ferns will grow in full sun if constant moisture is available.’
    • ‘In the male shield fern these are located along the midrib, while in the marginal-fruited shield fern they are placed on the margins of the divisions of the fronds.’
    • ‘Slugs will occasionally eat the young fronds of variegated shield, deer, hayscented or southern shield ferns.’
    • ‘Christmas fern and soft shield fern (P. setiferum) remain green; the fiddleheads of many ferns emerge early from the winter ground.’
    • ‘Historically there are a number of highly divided soft shield ferns known collectively as the plumose divisilobes which are now considered to be more characteristically plumose multilobes.’
    • ‘The shield ferns have this characteristic ‘thumb’ on the leaflets of the fronds and the spores cover both the leaflets and the thumb - you can just about make this out in one or two of the leaflets.’
    • ‘This forest has a diverse herb layer of spring wildflowers that bloom from April to June as well as shield ferns and mosses.’
    • ‘The distinctive shaggy, moss texture and neat habit of growth sets this variety of soft shield fern apart.’
    • ‘Fragrant shield fern or fragrant cliff fern (D. fragrans) is so named because its leathery, evergreen leaves have a spicy aroma when dry.’
    • ‘If the garden is on the drier side but still shady then the soft shield fern is for you.’
    • ‘There are more than 100 varieties of shield ferns in the commercial trade, ranging in height from two feet to four feet.’