Definition of sharp in English:



  • 1(of an object) having an edge or point that is able to cut or pierce something.

    ‘cut the cake with a very sharp knife’
    ‘keep tools sharp’
    • ‘Looking around, she found a sharp strong piece of wood.’
    • ‘Five sharp, bendable claws protruded from each of the hands and feet.’
    • ‘She cried out in pain; it felt like sharp knives were piercing her.’
    • ‘We smiled at them and each other as sharp bits of jeep pierced our civilization-softened bodies.’
    • ‘He gave her a sickening smile and then his lips drew back to reveal his long sharp glistening fangs.’
    • ‘Four sharp claws protruded from the creature's feet as well.’
    • ‘Right from the start it seemed as if Harris' entire political staff were hunting through the legislative library armed only with red pencils and sharp scissors.’
    • ‘The sharp, tapered tip is used to pierce and thread smaller cuts without damaging its appearance.’
    • ‘Use sharp tools no matter what type of plant you're pruning.’
    • ‘She fell on to her side, not caring about the sharp rocks piercing her thin side.’
    • ‘Their sharp weapons had pierced his sweet heart, and he had fallen at her side.’
    • ‘The bottom of the actuating rod has a sharp point, which pierces the gas cylinder release valve.’
    • ‘A stone is used for ‘honing’ which means putting a sharp edge on your knife.’
    • ‘There was nothing in the teepee sharp enough to use as a cutting tool.’
    • ‘Upon his mighty paws, which resembled large, furry, human hands, were claws sharp as razors and unbreakable as the most finally crafted swords.’
    • ‘Her fingernails grew long and sharp, able to pierce the skin of a creature in a matter of seconds.’
    • ‘Use sharp scissors to limit fabric movement when cutting.’
    • ‘Use sharp shears, and make each cut just beyond a side branch and just outside the branch bark ridges; don't leave stubs.’
    • ‘As soon as she touched it, she felt a sharp splinter pierce her thumb.’
    • ‘Craftsmen use a stainless steel knife, with a sharp edge and triangular blade, to cut rough shapes in the coir.’
    keen, sharp-edged, razor-sharp, razor-edged
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    1. 1.1Tapering to a point or edge.
      ‘a sharp pencil’
      ‘her face was thin and her nose sharp’
      • ‘She believed that she got the lead poisoning when a sharp pencil was poked into her cheek.’
      • ‘Is the form of his nose sharp, melancholy, or refined?’
      • ‘They must have used a very sharp pencil to draw that one up.’
      • ‘Despite picking the widest route, the travellers found their clothes being snagged on sharp twigs, and they grazed their knees on passing tree trunks more than once.’
      • ‘If you want to succeed in finance, you need a sharp mind - and a sharp pencil.’
      • ‘Jen grinned and she tapped her sharp pencil on the piece of paper.’
      • ‘The unguals are curved and taper to a sharp point, indicating that the digits terminated in distinct claws.’
      • ‘Then, with a felt-tipped pen or sharp pencil, mark the lag screw holes that were drilled in the ledger on the wail.’
      • ‘These spicules are up to 0.03 mm in diameter and taper to sharp tips.’
      • ‘I took out a sharp pencil and began to fill in the grades.’
      • ‘He had a tattoo across his lower back; it said ‘Shooter’ in sharp, pointy black letters.’
      • ‘The long robe drapes over the front of the throne, falling in pleats that taper to sharp points along the hem.’
      • ‘And then she took a sharp pencil and began making light, very fine lines.’
      pointed, tapering, tapered, needle-like, spiky
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    2. 1.2(of sand or gravel) composed of angular grains.
      • ‘To improve drainage without sacrificing nutrients, add sharp sand or perlite to a good sterilized compost-based mix.’
      • ‘Dig a trench with one straight side and put a mix of sharp sand and compost in the bottom to aid drainage, making the trench deep enough to allow two thirds of the cutting to be buried.’
      • ‘Take pencil-thick cuttings, about nine inches long, and plunge them outside to a depth of six inches in a trench lined with sharp sand.’
      • ‘Dig a v-shaped trench with a sloping side and a straight side and line it with sharp sand to help with drainage.’
      • ‘The material used is a mixture of cement, sharp sand and crushed rock or pebbles.’
      • ‘Or you may set your plant in sharp sand, and mix some lime with the soil which you replace.’
      • ‘Add a little sharp sand to improve drainage if your soil tends to hold water.’
      • ‘The seventh platform was covered in loose and sharp gravel.’
      • ‘I do, however, always add 25% sharp grit to all the composts to help with drainage and pot stability.’
      • ‘He had insisted on best quality sharp sand, but even then it was a lot of money to pay.’
      • ‘Sprinkle fine, sharp gravel around each bulb to discourage voles.’
      • ‘The farm deals in soft and sharp sand and gravel.’
      • ‘The crushing also produced a sharp sand with angular grains that made it far preferable as a bonding agent in mortar.’
      • ‘To discourage voles or gophers, add a handful of sharp gravel to the planting hole or plant bulbs in wire or fabric baskets.’
      • ‘Or remove the concrete and lay old bricks on a mixture of sharp sand and earth.’
      • ‘The principle consists simply of a smooth flat blade of soft iron, set in a frame and fed with sharp sand and water.’
      • ‘Start by adding plenty of sharp sand to your rosemary bed.’
      • ‘Top dress with sharp sand to improve the drainage.’
      • ‘This may be mixed with sharp sand, which will encourage the finer grasses.’
      • ‘This time it was six bags of sharp sand delivered by Mr Thin.’
  • 2Producing a sudden, piercing physical sensation or effect.

    ‘I suddenly felt a sharp pain in my back’
    • ‘There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleedings at the pores, with dissolution.’
    • ‘He suddenly felt a sharp pain in the side of his head.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, I felt a sharp pain in my back, as if I had fallen on a hot needle.’
    • ‘He poured her some unknown liquid and she drank it immediately - the sharp sensation of alcohol sent a pleasant burn down her throat.’
    • ‘A sudden, sharp pain in his side prompted him to double over.’
    • ‘A sharp piercing pain struck right through her stomach and, like a deadly plague, spread out through her body.’
    • ‘I gingerly moved to sit up, but a sharp pain shot through my body.’
    • ‘I suddenly felt a sharp pang of pain thrust through my stomach.’
    • ‘To top it all a niggling pain gave off a sharp, burning sensation in the bottom of her stomach.’
    • ‘It's often accompanied by abdominal pain - either mild and dull or sharp and intense.’
    • ‘Seek immediate medical attention if you experience a sudden, sharp pain in the upper left side of your abdomen.’
    • ‘Suddenly a sharp jolt of pain rang through my entire system as I opened my eyes.’
    • ‘She also experienced a sharp pain and burning sensation in her right elbow and a tingling sensation in her right hand and fingers.’
    • ‘Call the doctor right away if your child has sudden, sharp stomach pain that will not go away.’
    • ‘These involuntary contractions can be either dull or sharp and intense.’
    • ‘I glowered at him, feeling the sharp sensation at having made contact with his cheek so firmly.’
    • ‘A sharp and sudden pain in his left shoulder made him drop the man.’
    • ‘OK, it was the same type of shock, just a sharp shock, a sensation that went up my arm to the elbow.’
    • ‘If you have osteoporosis, the first warning sign might be a sudden sharp pain in your back that seems to have come on for no reason.’
    • ‘He slowly got up and breathed in the new day, filled with anticipation for this afternoon, but all of a sudden was struck with a sharp pain in his chest.’
    excruciating, agonizing, intense, violent, piercing, stabbing, shooting, stinging, severe, acute, keen, fierce, searing
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    1. 2.1(of a food, taste, or smell) acidic and intense.
      ‘fresh goats' milk cheese has a slightly sharper flavour than fromage frais’
      • ‘For a medium flavor, six months is required, while a sharp taste takes even longer.’
      • ‘She could sense his disbelief and excitement at her suggestions, mingling with the smell of his blood, adding a sharp tang much like a spice on food.’
      • ‘Sansho is used in Japanese cooking to add a sharp note to fatty foods, eels for example.’
      • ‘Then she smelt the sharp tang of sulphur again and turned back.’
      • ‘It's a very strong and sharp cheese, and it has tiny holes in it.’
      • ‘Sitting there silently for a while I took in the view of the ocean, and the salt air that carried with it the sharp smell of cut grass.’
      • ‘She felt her determination melt away as the doctor swabbed her wrist with the disinfectant, the sharp smell tickling her nose.’
      • ‘I often go to goat farms in the area to select the deliciously sour and sharp cheese in all its different varieties.’
      • ‘The sharp taste of salt and alkaline was tangy on my lips.’
      • ‘These materials both have a sharp smell, tangy taste, and are irritating to skin in large concentrations.’
      • ‘Her right ankle throbbed steadily and the smell of sharp herbs was coming from somewhere close.’
      • ‘Maybe you dream of me - the sharp taste of my tears, scent of my hair.’
      • ‘The sharp smell of medication and antiseptic replaced the cigarette and coffee smell of this small room.’
      • ‘I walk out and am immediately assaulted by a sharp smell in the air.’
      • ‘The sweetness of the raisins and ricotta balanced the otherwise sharp taste of the chard, and the pinenuts offered a nice textural change.’
      • ‘It had the sharp taste lemon tart should have but was not easy to cut on a saucer!’
      • ‘All of these Asian greens are tender and succulent, but flavors vary from mild and clean to sharp and peppery.’
      • ‘It gave off an unfamiliar sharp smell, and all the adults around me crunched into each stalk with gusto.’
      • ‘The original recipe suggests gruyère cheese, but I don't like that much and opted for a sharp English cheddar instead.’
      • ‘It smells like a lime, and has a very sharp taste.’
      acrid, burning, pungent
      tangy, piquant, strong
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    2. 2.2(of a sound) sudden and penetrating.
      ‘there was a sharp crack of thunder’
      • ‘The sharp sound of boot heels came from far away, approaching their barracks like some grim reaper, come to harvest their humiliation.’
      • ‘A sharp click sounded in her ears, but she was too busy to notice.’
      • ‘At times, sharp clicks and bubbles of noise will suddenly bulge to the top before disappearing back into the fray.’
      • ‘There was a crack of sharp thunder as the bullets plunged from their silver caves, and a shower of shells fell to the ground simultaneously.’
      • ‘Eventually, there was a sharp whistle and the boys looked around at the whistler.’
      • ‘He heard the sharp bark of a dog moments before the bang of pistol fire.’
      • ‘The pup stopped in front of him, and gave a sharp bark.’
      • ‘As copious steam clouds and sharp hoots pierce the morning calm, an air of excitement and expectation is palpable among those who have got into the coaches.’
      • ‘The sharp clang of metal on metal echoed throughout the arena.’
      • ‘The loud, sharp noise of the door closing confirmed that.’
      • ‘The wolf gave a sharp bark and motioned towards the exit.’
      • ‘She had just rolled over and began to dream of something else when she heard the sharp sound of breaking glass.’
      • ‘The gun itself barely moves, and the sharp sound of the report echoes through surrounding hills and dies away.’
      • ‘The sharp sound was so sudden that the horses nearest to him jumped and wouldn't settle down for at least five minutes.’
      • ‘All in all, not much got done until Mikhail's aunt Meredith came in and silenced them all with a sharp whistle.’
      • ‘When sharp sirens pierced rent the night air, the two thugs scrambled to standing positions and then ran off, disappearing into the night.’
      • ‘When Debbie entered the tiny white room, the sharp click of her too-high heels shattered the almost-silence.’
      • ‘A sharp whistle from the house brought the men up short.’
      • ‘A short, sharp bark of command and they were gone.’
      • ‘There was a sharp clatter when Mrs. Jones banged the pan with her spatula as she whipped around to face them.’
      loud, piercing, shrill, high-pitched, high, penetrating, harsh, strident
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    3. 2.3(of words or a speaker) critical or hurtful.
      ‘she feared his sharp tongue’
      ‘he could be very sharp with her’
      • ‘I've never known a holiday to be spoiled, or even darkened, by an argument, by tensions that crackle and erupt in sharp words.’
      • ‘Her words were sharp and hurtful and more than anything he knew now that he had been wrong to think she had some decency in her to start with.’
      • ‘Then he stalked off the field after a sharp word from the coach.’
      • ‘An elderly, well-dressed lady spoke in sharp tones to the pair, both of whom looked towards me and became silent.’
      • ‘Seemingly confident just a few weeks ago, she is now prone to utter sharp words about her critics in public.’
      • ‘I could still hear his sharp words: Why didn't he protect himself?’
      • ‘Desiree bit her tongue, for she felt like showering the mysterious knight with sharp words.’
      • ‘I'd left then, biting back my sharp words about how he could probably have afforded a proper grave for her if he didn't spend so much money in the tavern.’
      • ‘The organisers of the event came in for sharp words by the eager fans.’
      • ‘Her words were sharp and I felt them cut into each piece of my shattered heart.’
      • ‘She was still concerned about the exchange of sharp words between the men.’
      • ‘It might take a little persuasion and there might be a few sharp words exchanged but that was usually the height of it.’
      • ‘Fervently, she shook her head at each accusation he made, holding her hands over her ears in hope of blocking out such hurtful and sharp words.’
      • ‘Yesterday, I exchanged sharp words with an old friend online.’
      • ‘But then he remembered that he'd blown that all away with a few sharp words.’
      • ‘Another is to replace the sharp words with words of encouragement or at least something neutral.’
      • ‘She said a few sharp words, which the boy returned with a fallen face.’
      • ‘Mordechai spoke his sharp words not to her, but to posterity.’
      • ‘Nearly all of them contain sharp words for the president.’
      • ‘She felt out of place and in danger, but told herself that she was a lady of the court and with her sharp words and authority, she could defend herself.’
      harsh, bitter, hard, cutting, scathing, caustic, biting, barbed, trenchant, mordant, acrimonious, acerbic, tart, acid, sarcastic, sardonic, ill-tempered, spiteful, venomous, malicious, vitriolic, vicious, hurtful, nasty, unkind, severe, cruel, wounding, abusive
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    4. 2.4(of an emotion or experience) felt acutely or intensely; painful.
      ‘her sharp disappointment was tinged with embarrassment’
      • ‘They remember the sharp fear of unwanted pregnancies.’
      • ‘The disappointments are sharp, but the possibilities are endless.’
      • ‘She got out of the shower lazily, and had a sharp feeling in her stomach that something would happen today.’
      • ‘As her mind unravels we experience sudden images of sharp terror.’
      • ‘My feelings of disappointment were sharp, but soon the intifada was over.’
      • ‘Sometimes the cooks got confused and served it two weeks in a row, which was a sharp disappointment.’
      • ‘There's a short, sharp thrill about it, and we only have a band on for half an hour, so it doesn't take up a large chunk of the night if people don't like it.’
      • ‘I felt a sharp hope rising in me and I quelled it immediately.’
      intense, acute, keen, strong, bitter, fierce, searing, piercing, heartfelt, very great, overpowering
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  • 3Distinct in outline or detail; clearly defined.

    ‘the job was a sharp contrast from her past life’
    ‘the scene was as sharp and clear in his mind as a film’
    • ‘It is for the most part a very good transfer, with sharp contrasts and excellent details.’
    • ‘But - in sharp contrast - Reuters has stuck to a distinctive approach for decades.’
    • ‘Fully depress the button and the camera will have recorded the sharp shot of the couple you wanted.’
    • ‘At about noon, the city loomed before, the big black stone walls making a sharp contrast against the clear blue of the sky.’
    • ‘Birth to three months - newborn babies can't see particularly well, but they do like to look at faces and distinct patterns with sharp outlines.’
    • ‘The image is black-and-white with strong contrast and sharp detail.’
    • ‘Despite their pervasiveness, lanning clearly shows that such sharp distinctions cannot be maintained.’
    • ‘Detail is sharp and clear, contrast is nicely managed, and deep black levels make this pleasing to behold - visually.’
    • ‘He doesn't bother getting involved in details - he lays out a sharp contrast.’
    • ‘Clearly a sharp distinction must be drawn between means of production ordinarily conceived, and entrepreneurship.’
    • ‘If you want only the subject sharp, use a wide aperture.’
    • ‘The sharp detail and good contrast control offer a good look at the few interesting things that happen in the mostly darkened production.’
    • ‘The black-and-white image is stable with beautiful contrast and sharp detail.’
    • ‘These sharp, panoramic, full-color pictures provided fodder for a third Nature report.’
    • ‘The picture is so sharp you cannot see any individual pixels.’
    • ‘It's a great feeling to define in sharp crisp outlines what you believe in, and what you stand against.’
    • ‘In contrast, there are in Chile very sharp accent distinctions among the different social classes.’
    • ‘This is a recent production, and as such, the colors are well balanced and the picture sharp.’
    • ‘The colors all appear clearly defined and sharp while the black levels are solid and well saturated.’
    • ‘The image is sharp and well defined without any imperfections.’
    distinct, clear-cut, clear, well defined, well focused, crisp
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  • 4(of an action or change) sudden and marked.

    ‘there was a sharp increase in interest rates’
    ‘he heard her sharp intake of breath’
    • ‘In the short term, it must also be noted that the sharp reduction in air travel in the US is going to benefit inventories which were already exceptionally high.’
    • ‘According to their calculations, neither global sea level rise nor faster melting of glacial ice could have produced such a sharp change.’
    • ‘Back in the 1980s the figure was believed to be in the region of €4 billion during the sharp economic slowdown.’
    • ‘Individual chronologies were used to study the frequencies of sharp increases and decreases in growth.’
    • ‘Monday's sharp stock market plunge and uncertain world events may have you longing for a secure place to stash your savings.’
    • ‘Exports have been hit also because of the sudden and sharp increase in the value of the euro against the dollar and, most importantly, against sterling.’
    • ‘Those sharp dips mainly reflected the pace of technological progress and faster productivity growth.’
    • ‘It notes the sharp decline in voter participation - but also the increased politicisation that is taking place in society.’
    • ‘The decline was due to weaker current business conditions which reversed a sharp increase in July.’
    • ‘By a ‘currency crisis’ he means a sharp change in the value of the US dollar that would hurt the economy as a whole.’
    • ‘The capital encountered severe drought this year due to a sharp decrease in rainfall.’
    • ‘Human maturation is a gradual process, a continuum rather than a sharp change.’
    • ‘But plans for the repairs and redevelopment work have been put on a slow burner by the government as a result of the sharp economic downturn.’
    • ‘The plunge in profits and sudden sharp increase in the burden of debt are, of course, leading symptoms of a depression.’
    • ‘The traditional short-covering by speculators that usually followed a sharp downward movement was no longer present to instill some recovery.’
    • ‘Girls' education has particularly suffered, and the UN has noted a sharp decline in female literacy.’
    • ‘Thus, after an expansion has been in progress for some time, an event that is not of unusual size or duration can trigger a sharp financial reaction.’
    • ‘Such a return, given low interest rates, contributed to a sharp increase in his deferred savings in recent years.’
    • ‘So when the 1980s came along, there is a sharp decline in commodity prices and a sharp increase in real interest rates.’
    • ‘I have been away for three years and was struck by the sharp change in tone and perceptions.’
    sudden, abrupt, rapid
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    1. 4.1(of a bend, angle, or turn) making a sudden change of direction.
      ‘the bus creaked round a sharp hairpin bend’
      • ‘Indianapolis, of course, has the long straightaways, and sharp turns.’
      • ‘There are straight stretches and sharp bends and that is why there are so many fatalities on that road.’
      • ‘A sudden sharp turn made Tony lose his balance and hit the side of the van.’
      • ‘So I turned the car around, went back on myself to before the sharp bend and then turned the car round again so I was facing the way of my original direction before I saw the lights.’
      • ‘With no avail, she took a sharp turn, and bolted in the other direction.’
      • ‘Yesterday in our morning walk we turned a sharp bend in the road and walked into a cloud of fledgling barn swallows and their proud parents.’
      • ‘The culminating crisis resolves itself as a muddle-through, a bend rather than a sharp turn in the road.’
      • ‘They would travel in one direction for a while and then curve back in a very sharp turn in another direction.’
      • ‘A smooth, curved bedline is much easier to mow around than one with a lot of sharp angles and corners.’
      • ‘He talked smoothly while doing sharp turns round the corners.’
      • ‘The family in the other car were arriving for lunch just as we were leaving, and it was a stroke of extraordinary bad luck that we should have met on a sharp bend, the only one in an otherwise straight road.’
      • ‘One of his gossamer wings had been snapped off and the other was bent at a sharp angle, the many broken nerves causing it to twitch feebly.’
      • ‘They would travel in one direction for a while before curving back in a very sharp turn to another direction.’
      • ‘I had completed the sharp bend and it appeared before me, that barely visible path I was to take.’
      • ‘Now was time to use my new toy, the strip heater, since I needed a nice straight line bent at a sharp angle.’
      • ‘Turning a very sharp bend of what seemed like a U-turn, I only caught a passing glimpse of it.’
      • ‘Images of dissected tendon taken under the light microscope show that fibrils can sustain sharp bends or kinks along their length.’
      • ‘He lay sprawled on the tiles, his arms and legs bent at sharp angles.’
      • ‘As he made sharp turns around corners, he couldn't help but wonder why the guy was chasing him over an apple.’
      • ‘Every few yards the hall took a sharp turn and branched off in so many directions that it was impossible to know where you were.’
      hairpin, tight, angular
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  • 5Having or showing speed of perception, comprehension, or response.

    ‘her sharp eyes missed nothing’
    ‘his old mind was not so sharp as it once was’
    • ‘No matter how sharp you are at 70 or 80 years old, there is a slowing down.’
    • ‘With his peroxide head bowed, eyes closed, the old man feels his way forward, bandy legs shuffling, shoulders stooped, senses bat sharp, as keen as razor wire.’
    • ‘Rigel is looking ominously sharp now and his speed around the court is making it difficult for me to find a winner.’
    • ‘Pick it up, flip through it, dip into the story at any point and you will come away better informed and surprisingly entertained by his sharp mind and punk sense of humour.’
    • ‘It's probably good to keep some of the nonverbal aspects of my mind sharp.’
    • ‘If you have the right background and are sharp, witty and perceptive, we would like to hear from you.’
    • ‘It transcends its soap-opera instincts thanks to the bright humour and sharp observations of the script.’
    • ‘He couldn't see, true, but they didn't know about how sharp his hearing was.’
    • ‘I like to do logic problems to keep my mind sharp.’
    • ‘Quick intervention begins with keen sensitivity and sharp observation.’
    • ‘Competition is a good excuse to get your guns working and keep your eye sharp.’
    • ‘He misses little, his sharp eyes sweeping up and down whatever street or room he enters, taking everything in.’
    • ‘He had to keep his mind sharp to focus on the problem at hand.’
    • ‘He is renowned as a canny strategist and has a sharp economic mind, but his dictatorial approach and suppression of human rights worries many.’
    • ‘But everyone else was also entering into dangerous enemy territory, so Cat and her comrades had to stay sharp or else get left behind.’
    • ‘For his self-awareness is acute and his sense of humour is sharp.’
    • ‘Nutrients fight diseases of the heart, help prevent cancer and even keep the brain sharp.’
    • ‘She keeps her stand-up sharp by hitting the Provincetown comedy circuit every summer.’
    • ‘I've never worked with someone who is so perceptive, sharp and wise.’
    • ‘Jen seems intent on keeping her mind sharp; every night, after practice, she takes out the books from her locker and works on some maths or suchlike.’
    keen, perceptive, observant, acute, sharp-sighted, beady, hawklike
    perceptive, discerning, percipient, perspicacious, penetrative, piercing, penetrating, discriminating, sensitive, incisive, keen, keen-witted, acute, sharp-witted, quick, quick-witted, clever, shrewd, astute, intelligent, intuitive, bright, agile, nimble, nimble-witted, alert, quick off the mark, ready, apt, fine, finely honed, rapier-like, probing, searching, insightful, knowing
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    1. 5.1Quick to take advantage, especially in an unscrupulous or dishonest way.
      ‘Paul's a sharp operator’
      • ‘It's one thing if analysts are deceived by sharp operators.’
      • ‘In reality, it was ordinary citizens and not the sharp operators who stored their wealth in banknotes.’
      • ‘As for O'Neill, he left with his reputation as a quick-witted sharp operator severely dented.’
      clever, shrewd, canny, smart
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  • 6(of musical sound) above true or normal pitch.

    • ‘When the tip of her first finger touched it, a sharp note sang through her ears.’
    • ‘Apart from a tendency of the clarinet to go a tad sharp at times this was a most enjoyable performance.’
    • ‘I took out the tuner, and began tuning it just a smidge sharp, because I like the sound of it better that way.’
    • ‘The sound of the clarinet, in contrast, is depicted by a sound wave that looks like the crenellations on a castle, which leads to its more closed sound, compared to the sharp note of the violin.’
    • ‘They can quote a flat or a sharp note from a singer in any number of recordings, give you the date and place of the recording, and they collect them all.’
    • ‘Rebecca knew it was really cold when Jimmy took a full ten minutes to warm up from slightly flat to his usual, obnoxiously sharp pitch.’
    • ‘The entire musical burden is shifted to the massive chorus, while fierce sharp chords pronounce the onset of the bloody wounds.’
    • ‘A note has the same name, whether it is sharp, flat or natural.’
    • ‘The Quail's voice also gave rise to a number of imitative names in Britain and Ireland, which incorporate the three sharp notes.’
    • ‘In ‘musette tuning’ two reeds sound simultaneously for each note, one tuned slightly sharp, giving a tremolo effect.’
    1. 6.1[postpositive](of a note) a semitone higher than a specified note.
      ‘F sharp’
      • ‘His annotations to this CD proudly point out the Cs, C sharps, and Ds that he must sing.’
      • ‘I wrote a few brass pieces, and my magnum opus, an orchestral epic called Life in C sharp, which displayed minimalist influences - lots of C sharps.’
      • ‘The F sharp Nocturne comes to life in a remarkable manner whilst the C sharp minor Etude also creates a palpable sense of mystery.’
      • ‘Also, there are many ways of producing an F sharp on a cello.’
    2. 6.2(of a key) having a sharp or sharps in the signature.
      • ‘The standard treble is available in B, sounding a tone below written pitch and best for flat keys, or in A, sounding a minor 3rd lower and better for sharp keys.’
  • 7informal (of clothes or their wearer) smart and stylish.

    ‘they were greeted by a young man in a sharp suit’
    • ‘I just wore sharp clothes, and whenever anyone asked who was I supposed to be, I told them and smiled.’
    • ‘He will be dressed in a sharp dinner suit, with his bow tie undone, looking suave and handsome as if he had stepped out of GQ Magazine.’
    • ‘Scuzzily-dressed blokes will up a gear and start attiring themselves competitively with funky shirts, sharp trousers and bobby dazzlers.’
    • ‘Complete your look with sharp looking dressy shoes.’
    • ‘Even he looked quite winsome in sharp, dark clothes and a cape behind him.’
    • ‘When you hear the word secretary, you probably think of a pretty, petite lady who wears stylish, sharp skirt outfits.’
    • ‘It can be worn on a night out on the town and can add a sharp touch to any outfit.’
    • ‘So, would you prefer the plane you're sitting in to be flown by an algorithm or by a couple of really smart pilots in sharp uniforms?’
    • ‘In the fall, a flat loafer, heavy tights, and a nice pair of trousers is a sharp look.’
    • ‘He is dapper in blazer, cane, sharp hat and regimental tie, which he wears with a tie clip.’
    • ‘Expect sharp suits, chic outfits and a style more modern than what we've come to expect from some pop divas.’
    • ‘I was so sharp in these new stylish clothes, I could cut butter, or at least turn heads.’
    • ‘The result is a translation of ordinarily masculine clothing into sharp womenswear that's feminine and sexy without flashing flesh.’
    • ‘Extreme heat, a lot of sweat and a dirty working environment have surely scared away many youths, who dream of working in a sharp suit in a cool office.’
    • ‘He may not have had his eyes, but he looked great, he was sharp, he was smart and women were attracted to him.’
    • ‘Then it was back into his sharp street clothes, to wait for a friend to pick him up to go cruising their territories.’
    • ‘I recently bought a really sharp suit at the Men's Warehouse here in Philly.’
    • ‘Before him stood a clean, young man dressed in a sharp business suit.’
    • ‘After all, he was wearing sharp clothes and seemed to be giving out the orders.’
    • ‘The prospect of anti-capitalist mobilisations pushed the Swiss bankers to abandon sharp suits and dress down.’
    smart, stylish, fashionable, chic, modish, elegant, spruce
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  • 1Precisely (used after an expression of time)

    ‘the meeting starts at 7.30 sharp’
    • ‘At 8 p.m. sharp the Fashion Show commenced.’
    • ‘Tuesday morning, 8 sharp I was back at the hospital.’
    • ‘The school was a day school as well as a boarding school, so after five, the day pupils were allowed to return home for the night, but they must be back in school by nine sharp the next morning.’
    • ‘The next meeting takes place on Wednesday, May 14, at 8pm sharp and will be the annual general meeting.’
    • ‘All he told me was that he would come and get me by 3: 00 PM sharp the next day.’
    • ‘The parade will come through the town at 3pm sharp with the floats gathering in ARCH at 2pm.’
    • ‘Not exactly the 8am sharp time they had indicated in the memo.’
    • ‘All players are asked to be at the pitch at 7p.m. sharp.’
    • ‘Miraculously we were ready to leave at seven o'clock sharp each day.’
    precisely, exactly, on the dot
    View synonyms
  • 2In a sudden or abrupt way.

    ‘turn sharp right at the corner’
    ‘he was brought up sharp by Helen's voice’
    • ‘On anything other than a smooth track it would suddenly turn sharp left for no reason.’
    abruptly, suddenly, sharply, all of a sudden, unexpectedly, without warning
    View synonyms
  • 3Above the true or normal pitch of musical sound.

    ‘he heard him playing a little sharp on the high notes’


  • 1A musical note raised a semitone above natural pitch.

    • ‘In this example, the given notated key is two sharps.’
    • ‘For example, ‘Within the circle of fifths, if the key of G has one sharp, how many sharps are there in the key of D?’’
    • ‘The chromatic scale includes five additional notes - the sharps and flats (black keys of a piano).’
    • ‘His scale organizes the notes into octaves, with sharps and flats in between.’
    • ‘The student begins to understand the origins of key and tonality, rather than memorizing the order of flats and sharps.’
    • ‘Ex. 4 shows an octave of the chromatic scale beginning on C, notated in sharps ascending and flats descending.’
    • ‘But one day I asked Kathryn how many sharps E major had.’
    • ‘By remembering a simple pattern one can determine the amount of sharps and flats in a major chord.’
    • ‘Pitch class is the name of a tone, such as A, B, C, etc., including sharps (#) and flats (b).’
    • ‘Starting on C major, they ascend in pitch utilizing the key signatures that employ no more than four sharps or flats.’
    • ‘Choices in successive levels expand to all notes, then sharps and flats.’
    • ‘The important thing isn't anything to do with the sharps and flats, or the tricky counting.’
    • ‘The nineteenth century added some mechanics to the beast to allow it some ability to play sharps and flats and to modulate, but it's still not a chromatic instrument, and since at least Wagner, music sings mainly chromatically.’
    1. 1.1The sign ♯, indicating a sharp.
      • ‘Chong goes so far as to indicate fingering with Arabic numbers; flats and sharps are marked by downward and upward arrows, respectively.’
      • ‘The smart little thing knows how to whistle the closing melody of one of my piano concerti, though he's added a sharp on the G.’
      • ‘When you count up five letters in the alphabet, you must place a sharp or a fiat, depending on where you are in the circle.’
      • ‘For keys with sharps, look at the last sharp in the series of sharps, and say the catch phrase ‘little step up, big step down.’’
  • 2A long, sharply pointed needle used for general sewing.

    1. 2.1A thing with a sharp edge, such as a blade or a fragment of glass.
      ‘the safe disposal of sharps and clinical waste’
      • ‘Workers must be trained in safe handling techniques of livestock medical wastes, including medical sharps.’
      • ‘Many exposures result from a failure to follow Infection Control guidelines regarding the safe handling and disposal of sharps.’
      • ‘Needles and other sharps must be placed in a puncture-proof container.’
      • ‘Secondary prevention, by contrast, refers to practices and technologies that make sharps safer, such as retractable blades and shielded hypodermic needles.’
      • ‘Three competency tools - paper, videotape, and CD-ROM - were created for safe techniques in the use of sharps for the scrub role.’
      • ‘Needles and sharps should be counted audibly and concurrently by the scrub person and circulating nurse at the beginning of the procedure, as items are added to the field, and at the end of the procedure per the facility's policy.’
      • ‘These safety shields will reduce the risk of accidental exposure of healthcare workers to infectious agents through contaminated sharps in the workplace.’
      • ‘A tremendous amount of work is necessary to redesign surgical sharps and procedures so that exposure to blood and body fluid is reduced significantly during surgery.’
      • ‘Counting sponges, sharps, and instruments with the circulating nurse is the scrub person's responsibility.’
      • ‘Almost all laboratories must handle and dispose of sharps and blood and urine samples.’
      • ‘Primary prevention techniques eliminate the need to introduce sharps into the workplace, thereby reducing the number of injuries caused by needlesticks.’
      • ‘Before closing the skin incisions, perioperative team members count all sponges, sharps, and instruments and report correct counts to the surgeon.’
      • ‘Separate containers must be used for ‘dry’ and ‘wet’ materials and sharps (needles, scalpel blades).’
      • ‘Proper work practice controls include a no-hands procedure in handling contaminated sharps and the elimination of hand-to-hand instrument passing in the OR.’
      • ‘Fatigue, long procedures, poor lighting, confined space, and the use of various sharps and instruments make the OR one of the most hazardous hospital environments for patients and health care staff members.’
      • ‘The count procedure pertains to the perioperative RN's counting of sponges, sharps, and instruments throughout the surgical procedure and the documentation of these counts.’
      • ‘The safest method of preventing injury from sharps on the sterile field is using the hands-free technique instead of hand-to-hand passing of needles or sharp items between the surgeon and scrub person.’
      • ‘Never put needles or other sharps into clinical or household waste bags.’
      • ‘Councils must start giving the public clear information on what to do if they find a needle and offer staff training on how to safely remove sharps.’
      • ‘The exposure control plan shall also contain input from non-managerial employees responsible for direct patient care who are potentially exposed to injuries from contaminated sharps.’
  • 3informal A swindler or cheat.

    See also card sharp
    • ‘However, when the number is right, the sharps bet into books that post 20-cent lines.’
    • ‘Deals of all sorts will be cut before this election ends here in the home of the sharps and sharks who have been cutting all sorts of deals for more than a century.’


  • 1US Music
    Raise the pitch of (a note).

  • 2archaic Cheat or swindle (someone), especially at cards.

    ‘the fellow is drunk, let's sharp him’


Old English sc(e)arp, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch scherp and German scharf.