Definition of Shaolin in English:

Shaolin

noun

  • [mass noun], [usually as modifier] Any of various styles or schools of Chinese martial arts developed by the monks of the Shaolin Temple, a Buddhist monastery in China.

    • ‘Abuses of the Shaolin brand is also seen in China.’
    • ‘My next-door neighbour was a Shaolin kung fu master and I used to play with his children.’
    • ‘He has practiced Kung Fu - Wushu since childhood and has graduated in the Northern Shaolin style.’
    • ‘A friend of mine named Trevor, who is also a software engineer, is a student of Shaolin Kung Fu, an ancient Chinese martial arts system.’
    • ‘The temple is next to an old athletic association where the Shaolin martial arts have been taught for more than 150 years.’
    • ‘Established in the 1980s, Shaolin Martial Arts Troupe made its debut overseas performance in Japan in December 1990.’
    • ‘He told her about the difficulties he faced while trying to become a Shaolin Warrior.’
    • ‘Nor do Shaolin's American adherents seem bothered by Yan Ming's celebrity cachet.’
    • ‘A close to capacity audience was enthralled by the Masters of Shaolin Kung Fu who made their second appearance in successive years at the Theatre Royal last week.’
    • ‘There is a comment that today's Shaolin performers know nothing of Dharma and demonstrate nothing about Dharma on their tour.’
    • ‘Also opening sometime in September is the much touted Hong Kong flick Shaolin Soccer, about monks who turn their fighting skills to sport.’
    • ‘It tells the stories of four aspiring martial artists and their quest to live a life devoted to Shaolin.’
    • ‘Number one in China, the Shaolin master himself showed a few moves.’
    • ‘Hung Hei Goon is said to have been Gee sin's top disciple and best of the so-called Shaolin's Ten Best.’
    • ‘In order to prepare herself, she travels to China for 3,000 days of grueling Shaolin kung fu training.’
    • ‘He takes shelter in the Shaolin Temple, where he forced to undergo thirty-five chambers of the Shaolin monk training.’
    • ‘I always went with the bag and stopped at remote and uninhabited places to practise my Shaolin.’
    • ‘Hand of Death is set in 17th century China, the Ching dynasty era when Manchu occupiers persecuted the members of the Shaolin sect.’
    • ‘Finding the resident clergy weak and prone to the depredations of local bandits, he taught them exercises and self-defence, from which evolved the famous Shao-lin style of martial arts.’
    • ‘The attribution of Shaolin (or Shaolin temple) to a style was often used to enhance prestige.’

Origin

From Chinese Shàolínsì, literally young forest temple.

Pronunciation:

Shaolin

/ˈʃaʊlɪn/