Definition of shadowland in English:

shadowland

noun

literary
  • 1A place in shadow.

    • ‘But the only known Mandrake tree in existence is in the centre of the shadowlands.’
    • ‘He also offers ‘Shadowland,’ presenting himself not as self-righteous doomsayer but as a mortal man wandering a hard place, ‘a heartbroken pilgrim in the shadowland.’’
    1. 1.1An indeterminate borderland between places or states, typically represented as an abode of ghosts and spirits.
      ‘I could hear voices laughing in the shadowlands of my recall’
      • ‘It's the shadowland of sex and fame, the alternative world for those who can't act or can't wait.’
      • ‘But every culture also has its shadowlands - inhabited by those who suffer no less, but who are cast as disturbing ‘others’ who are marginal, threatening, uncontained.’
      • ‘First, there's an intriguing story, with a fantasy world split between humans and inhumans, and two interweaving plot lines that slip between the pastoral realms of the former and the harsh shadowlands of the latter.’
      • ‘For then he would place obstacles in their path, conjuring up dragons of the mind or unleashing the bandits who haunted the unpatrolled shadowlands through which ran the trade route linking the Ganga to the peninsula's capitals.’
      • ‘Both were possessed of massive majorities in Parliament and both believed the opposition to be a spent force, vanquished to the political shadowlands.’
      • ‘And in that shadowland we must try to live the metaphor.’
      • ‘Now more than ever the profession needs strong inspired leadership to rescue it from the shadowlands.’
      • ‘Now, like that other great neglected postwar British playwright Edward Bond, Barker exists in the shadowlands because he tells us what we do not want to hear in ways that we find difficult to swallow.’
      • ‘‘I called it the blue shadowlands,’ he recalls.’
      • ‘Once we enter the residential lobby we encounter the city's shadowland of mirage.’

Pronunciation:

shadowland

/ˈʃadəʊland/