Definition of setter in English:

setter

noun

  • 1A dog of a large long-haired breed trained to stand rigid when scenting game.

    • ‘Upon seeing the approaching beauty, the setter perks up and stands at attention.’
    • ‘The setter sniffed the sidewalk, then with a wag of her shaggy tail took off down the street.’
    • ‘And like the purebred English pointers and setters he reared, Farrior inherited a love of the chase.’
    • ‘As with any drop-eared dog, the setter's closed ear canal can harbor dirt, wax and bacteria.’
    • ‘It is pretty well understood that both whippets and setters were used in the early development of the breed.’
    • ‘The setter's long-haired coat easily wards off the north country's brisk autumn climate and punishing brier tangles.’
    • ‘Because it is smaller than setters and retrievers, the springer is better suited to navigate the thick brush often encountered in bird hunting.’
  • 2usually in combination A person or thing that sets something.

    ‘the battle between wage-setters and policy-makers’
    • ‘If you have decided to be a strand style setter, enjoy the challenges, the hard work and the ultimate compliments and admiration for a style well designed.’
    • ‘Like Lang, Preminger and Tourneur, Carter is a master scene setter, whether that scene be downtown New York or boho Paris.’
    • ‘It is, however, precisely the role of the standard setter to define the class of transactions included within the economic arrangement and to then establish the appropriate accounting for that class of transactions.’
    • ‘Their decision means the EU is de facto the primary standard setter in the area of European environmental policy.’
    • ‘Music is one of the most important mood setters for an aerobics class.’
    • ‘After all, they are the ones who will be in charge - the agenda setters, the power brokers, and the virtual architects of the new digital order.’
    • ‘Another German swimmer was among the four men's European record setters.’
    • ‘In this role as agenda setters and debate arbiters, the networks' broadcasts profoundly affect the democratic process.’
    • ‘Mr Ashman, who has now turned into a professional question setter for radio quiz shows, said it was nice for England to bring home at least one trophy this year.’
    • ‘Standard setters are now targeting stock options again; after Enron, this is becoming harder to resist.’
    • ‘A company that is an expert in the field of bar coding has gained accreditation from the industry's standard setter.’
    • ‘This was most evident in the 200 fly, in which 61-year-old Daniela Barnea of Stanford Masters was the only record setter.’
    • ‘The rate setters want to restrain inflation, as well as galloping house prices, consumer spending and debt levels.’
    • ‘America's music industry has been, for decades, the world's standard setter.’
    • ‘He was the sole price setter, free to set marginal revenue equal to marginal cost, and free to set price far above marginal cost.’
    • ‘I believe that we need to be goal setters and achievers.’
    • ‘And now exotic foliage, such as palm leaves, is becoming a floral fashion setter.’
    • ‘The national record setter was Tressa-Ann Charles, whose recent high was attributed to a change of attitude and hard work.’
    • ‘Tommy Lynch was question setter and quizmaster and he is to be congratulated for his efforts.’
    • ‘African Americans are style-adapters and setters, and frequently the first group to try new products, especially those that reflect their culture.’

Pronunciation

setter

/ˈsɛtə/