Definition of sensible in English:

sensible

adjective

  • 1Done or chosen in accordance with wisdom or prudence; likely to be of benefit:

    ‘I cannot believe that it is sensible to spend so much’
    ‘a sensible diet’
    • ‘But given the pernicious infighting in the sport, it may be some time before punters can fully benefit from a sensible review of outdated laws.’
    • ‘‘It might be sensible to spend some money wisely in certain areas,’ he said.’
    • ‘They manage to make this sound quite sensible and to the benefit of both patients and the NHS.’
    • ‘They give no quarter to religion, received opinion, stumbling politicians, TV networks or sensible diets.’
    • ‘A sensible diet will maximise the effects of your training.’
    • ‘Or is it simply sensible and prudent to be thinking about these things now, rather than my more normal method of moving and then sorting out all this sort of thing?’
    • ‘In the meantime, women should be getting the clear message about the many health benefits of adopting a sensible diet and engaging in regular exercise.’
    • ‘Her diet was sensible and work load was not causing her undue stress.’
    • ‘Drivers are more likely to respect a sensible approach to road safety such as locally controlled temporary limits, as used successfully by a number of other councils around the country.’
    • ‘But even if this is true, it's still sensible and prudent not to base our plans on the rosiest of possible outcomes.’
    • ‘And this is likely to encourage sensible treatment decisions, and also lifestyle decisions, so that people can make the best of what might be limited time.’
    • ‘The 30 mph limit all the way from Waterhead through the village was surely sensible, and more likely to be obeyed.’
    • ‘Marrying the two in a mutually beneficial collaboration seems a sensible solution and unlike most marriages, it needn't be expensive.’
    • ‘A healthy diet coupled with sensible exercise is the only way to regain one's figure and fitness levels after child birth.’
    • ‘You might try some exercise and a sensible diet first.’
    • ‘A combination of sensible diet and moderate physical activity can effectively pull the plug on an expanding waistline.’
    • ‘This is a sensible development which will benefit broadcasters and producers alike.’
    • ‘Mr Justice Smyth said he felt the plaintiff was adopting a prudent and sensible approach to the matter and he would approve the settlement.’
    • ‘If spending on this scale is sensible, its wisdom ought to be demonstrable.’
    • ‘This seems to me to be sensible guidance and likely to result in families being housed together until the children are reasonably mature.’
    practical, realistic, responsible, full of common sense, reasonable, rational, logical, sound, circumspect, balanced, sober, no-nonsense, pragmatic, level-headed, serious-minded, thoughtful, commonsensical, down-to-earth, wise, prudent, mature
    judicious, sagacious, sharp, shrewd, far-sighted, intelligent, clever
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a person) possessing or displaying prudence:
      ‘he was a sensible and capable boy’
      • ‘I see a balance between a very few sensible people and a crowd of craven cretins.’
      • ‘Meanwhile the big publishers and the big retailers probably won't disappear, any more than the local supermarket will close if a few sensible people go to the farmers' market.’
      • ‘That said, I recognise that there are perfectly sensible people who prefer Beethoven to the Beatles, and who choose to discuss things at a more rarefied level than I care to myself.’
      • ‘A number of normally sensible people in Europe have supported this proposition.’
      • ‘Now why any sensible person, who is supposedly committed to their partner, would begin to think that this could be good for their relationship is totally beyond me!’
      • ‘Emma is a sensible person who likes to read the end of a story to decide if she should bother reading the entire book - if she doesn't like the ending, she figures, why read it at all?’
      • ‘Good, normally sensible drivers start thinking about taking chances.’
      • ‘Because you are a fair minded person you'll make a point of uncovering these shortcomings in their arguments and sharing what you find with other sensible people.’
      • ‘What sane, sensible person would throw more than a billion dollars at the overseas sharemarket at a time of major volatility?’
      • ‘But I do know sensible people who are far, far more optimistic.’
      • ‘Vice is like suffering: each individual instance of it is regrettable, but what sensible person would wish to eliminate it altogether?’
      • ‘Next she will be saying she is sensible and sane.’
      • ‘Considering the array of expertise before the committee, one would think a rational, sensible person would want to give it some thought.’
      • ‘And they wonder why any sensible person won't join the party!’
      • ‘These were sensible people who knew their clientele.’
      • ‘And the chefs, brawling in an empty kitchen, will be ignored by sensible people who will eat and enjoy the sandwich, blasphemous ingredients and all.’
      • ‘In such a situation, what do sensible people do?’
      • ‘Did they put a face on their activism, so people could see that the person behind the keyboard was a normal, likable, and downright sensible person?’
      • ‘I don't know Michael, Claudia, or Fred from the Fraser Institute although I'm sure that they're very sensible people.’
      • ‘But more sensible people say, ‘Why are you so sold on the notion that this World is all there is?’’
      practical, realistic, responsible, full of common sense, reasonable, rational, logical, sound, circumspect, balanced, sober, no-nonsense, pragmatic, level-headed, serious-minded, thoughtful, commonsensical, down-to-earth, wise, prudent, mature
      judicious, sagacious, sharp, shrewd, far-sighted, intelligent, clever
      View synonyms
  • 2(of an object) practical and functional rather than decorative:

    ‘Mum always made me have sensible shoes’
    • ‘What I do care about is the practicality of running around in a sandpit with sensible shoes on for 10 minutes.’
    • ‘A car for everyone, a sensible, safe, practical tool in which people and luggage can be transported reliably, efficiently and as cheaply as technically possible.’
    • ‘That marked the transition to sensible, practical footwear but she still had to have her swan song.’
    • ‘Part shrine, part purveyor of durable, practical and sensible outdoor gear, MEC has what you need - and they'll tell you exactly what that is and why.’
    • ‘But a classic is a classic, and it remains a thoroughly sensible, practical and useful book.’
    • ‘Since this has happened I have become embarrassed about what I thought to be a practical, sensible coin.’
    • ‘Now that I'm officially old I'll have to settle down, buy a pair of sensible shoes and get something magnificently practical like a winch.’
    • ‘I felt like a 29 year old kid in a rather sensible sweet shop, buying all the things I've wanted for weeks but done without.’
    • ‘The card is only a fraction of the size compared what were used to seeing with 3D cards, but nevertheless, this type of design is sensible as well as practical.’
    practical, realistic, responsible, full of common sense, reasonable, rational, logical, sound, circumspect, balanced, sober, no-nonsense, pragmatic, level-headed, serious-minded, thoughtful, commonsensical, down-to-earth, wise, prudent, mature
    judicious, sagacious, sharp, shrewd, far-sighted, intelligent, clever
    View synonyms
  • 3archaic Readily perceived; appreciable:

    ‘it will effect a sensible reduction in these figures’
    • ‘It is not even sufficient for perceiving merely sensible qualities such as colours and shapes.’
    • ‘And even if it did, our mind's ability to perceive what is sensible would not necessarily be accurate.’
    1. 3.1sensible of/to Able to notice or appreciate; not unaware of:
      ‘we are sensible of the difficulties he faces’
      • ‘For if the reason is sound, it is sensible of the body's diseases: but being itself diseased with those of the soul, it has no judgment in what it suffers.’
      • ‘A truly humble man is sensible of his natural distance from God; of his dependence on him; of the insufficiency of his own power and wisdom.’

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘perceptible by the senses’): from Old French, or from Latin sensibilis, from sensus (see sense).

Pronunciation

sensible

/ˈsɛnsɪb(ə)l/