Definition of sell the pass in English:

sell the pass

phrase

British
  • Betray a cause.

    ‘he is merciless to other poets whom he considers to have sold the pass’
    • ‘The third of the Derby / Disraeli minority Tory administrations then brought in its own bill for the towns, thus selling the pass of the anti-reformers' position.’
    • ‘These people at the beginning of the 20th century sold the pass on that one, and decided that we were better off without this language, which was the badge, supposedly, of our superiority to the other creatures.’
    • ‘On that point Isaacs' wife might have unwittingly sold the pass.’
    • ‘And responsibility for that external breakdown lies squarely with the paramilitary thugs and their political appeasers, who have simply sold the pass.’
    • ‘If those in government allow themselves to be intimidated into neutrality because they harbour private peccadilloes, they will sell the pass to the prophets of moral nihilism.’
    • ‘There was some minor resistance from a few tiers down the management structure in some companies, but the upshot was that the OEMs bravely sold the pass.’
    • ‘Perhaps Confucius and Mencius had already sold the pass.’
    • ‘The great marquess never sold the pass on such an issue of principle, the great adventurer couldn't resist dishing the Whigs by out-democratising them.’
    • ‘Following their decision he said: ‘By their refusal to make the retention of the Lucozade Sign a condition of the development package, Hounslow have sold the pass.’’
    • ‘Query whether you do not sell the pass once you concede that there might be just a little tiny bit of punishment in there.’
    • ‘He arrived knowing that the French government had already sold the pass at the Congress of Berlin.’
    • ‘At the same time, he believed that ‘the quint-essential Diehard… never entirely trusts his leaders not to sell the pass behind his back.’’
    • ‘Alas, he himself feebly sold the pass when he agreed in his ‘concordat’ with the Constitution Secretary to the abolition of the Lord Chancellor.’
    • ‘A substantial number of the party's ruling council could never accept that the hardliner they voted for to stonewall seemed to have sold the pass.’