Definition of sell-out in English:

sell-out

noun

  • 1An event for which all tickets are sold.

    ‘the game is sure to be a sell-out’
    • ‘So if you missed out on tickets for the sell-out Edinburgh event, make your way to the Globe Arena on September 10 and 11.’
    • ‘People recognise the name and have a vague idea who he is, but in Australia he is huge, having hosted his own TV series, released best-selling albums and performed countless sell-out tours.’
    • ‘It was a sell-out night with 400 tickets sold, many to students at the school.’
    • ‘Given the fact that last year's event was a complete sell-out, those interested in attending this year should get their hands on tickets as quickly as possible to avoid disappointment.’
    • ‘The Donegal singer recently performed at a sell-out concert in Galway Town Hall Theatre and at her very successful shows in Tipperary and Kerry.’
    • ‘This show had a nationwide sell-out tour in 2003 and sold out St Nicholas' Church in Galway again last Christmas and last May, achieving standing ovations at each show.’
    • ‘The singer, who will turn 37 later this month, postponed her sell-out tour of Australia and pulled out of her headline appearance at next month's Glastonbury Festival following the diagnosis.’
    • ‘All the events were sell-outs and were supported magnificently.’
    • ‘The quality of Cuppers entries has proved so consistently impressive that it is now a sell-out event.’
    • ‘Tickets are available directly from the Arts Centre and patrons are advised to book early as it is expected to be a sell-out event.’
    • ‘The event was a sell-out success and the organisers are now almost certain to bring the event back to the town in May 2005.’
    • ‘The international multi-platinum award-winning band has already performed in South Africa during a sell-out tour in March this year.’
    • ‘The band signed with Universal, the world's biggest record company, a year ago, and have since had a platinum-selling album, three top five singles, and are now set to go on a nationwide sell-out tour.’
    • ‘While organisers have claimed an increase in the number of sell-out screenings, the event is struggling and has recorded financial losses for the past three years in a row.’
    • ‘Over 7,500 people got to see this show at the Edinburgh Festival this summer and many more were left disappointed, as it became the sell-out hit of the event.’
    • ‘A total of £1, 578 was raised by the sell-out event.’
    • ‘And police chiefs warned fans to behave and urged them not to travel to the sell-out game without a ticket.’
    • ‘Expectations are high for what promises to be a sell-out event.’
    • ‘The concert was a sell-out as soon as tickets went on sale.’
    • ‘A 72,000 sell-out, tickets for the game were snapped up within hours of it being announced in March.’
  • 2A betrayal of one's principles for reasons of expedience.

    ‘one of the biggest political sell-outs in decades’
    • ‘Corporate work might sound like a sell-out, but it's actually a much more honest way to make a buck.’
    • ‘A shameful catalogue of abandonment, betrayal, sell-out, dishonesty and total breach of trust.’
    • ‘Pressure groups, however, have described the final deal as ineffective and one of the biggest political sell-outs in decades.’
    • ‘There was no doubt that many in the folk music scene regarded the transition to electric guitar as a betrayal and a sell-out of everything they believed in.’
    • ‘It is a sell-out - an utter betrayal of the working people of this country, and of every patriotic New Zealander.’
    disloyalty, treachery, perfidy, perfidiousness, bad faith, faithlessness, falseness
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

sell-out

/ˈsɛlaʊt/