Definition of seduce in English:

seduce

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Entice (someone) into sexual activity:

    ‘a lawyer had seduced a female client’
    • ‘The girl had never so easily seduced a man.’
    • ‘The samurai wants to seduce the cute girl but she rejects his advances.’
    • ‘He sets out to seduce Judy, the most attractive young woman in sight.’
    • ‘I heard a rumor, freshman year, that he once tried to seduce every single female teacher in the school.’
    • ‘In every romance, every relationship, one is seduced.’
    • ‘I made most of the phone calls to get people into the movie and didn't try to seduce anyone.’
    • ‘Perhaps she would completely seduce him in the next week.’
    persuade someone to have sexual intercourse, take away someone's innocence
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  • 2Entice (someone) to do or believe something inadvisable or foolhardy:

    ‘they should not be seduced into thinking that their success ruled out the possibility of a relapse’
    • ‘When life is so short, why is it that some of us are seduced into working with difficult, unreasonable, and obnoxious people?’
    • ‘The master storyteller has been seduced by the lure of technology.’
    • ‘Particularly notable, Zimbardo said, is that people are seduced into evil by dehumanizing and labeling others.’
    • ‘He was seduced into the unionist country house set very early on.’
    • ‘Consumers were easily seduced into buying more for less.’
    • ‘Even pet lovers may be seduced by the possibilities of cloning.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, we are easily seduced into thinking popularisation of such a subject is, by definition, a bad thing.’
    • ‘It amazes him how people get seduced by the bogus trappings of fame.’
    • ‘The opponent is easily seduced into long, lob style passes and dribbling into trouble.’
    • ‘Because of feminism's many successes, women have been seduced into submission once again.’
    • ‘She appreciates its particular qualities without allowing herself to be seduced by its insidious charms.’
    • ‘Thus, those having any sense of the wrongness of the activity must be seduced.’
    • ‘He was seduced into politics and fell victim to the hubristic notion that he, and he alone, could once again be France's saviour.’
    attract, allure, lure, tempt, entice, beguile, cajole, wheedle, ensnare, charm, captivate, enchant, hypnotize, mesmerize, tantalize, titillate, bewitch, ravish, inveigle, lead astray, trap
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    1. 2.1 Attract powerfully:
      ‘the melody seduces the ear with warm string tones’
      • ‘By the end of my first day there, Lisbon had completely seduced me.’
      • ‘The delicate layers of percussion, viola, double bass, trumpet and flugelhorn soothe and seduce the ears, but it's Williams' tender vocals that lull the listener into submission.’
      • ‘To begin with, he relies on the sound of language to seduce the reader.’
      • ‘With its opening driving bass rhythms and subdued organ entrance you are immediately seduced by its hypnotic beat.’
      • ‘He has seduced audiences with his charismatic portrayals of characters for 57 years.’
      • ‘What he doesn't do is seduce the audience with his nihilistic charm.’
      • ‘Olson is an electrifying performer, who seduces her audiences with wit and energy.’

Origin

Late 15th century (originally in the sense ‘persuade (someone) to abandon their duty’): from Latin seducere, from se- away, apart + ducere to lead.

Pronunciation:

seduce

/sɪˈdjuːs/