Definition of secretary in English:

secretary

noun

  • 1A person employed by an individual or in an office to assist with correspondence, make appointments, and carry out administrative tasks.

    ‘she was secretary to David Wilby MP’
    • ‘Additional staff is needed to run rural branch surgeries, which restricts partners' ability to employ secretaries and administrators.’
    • ‘She waited for the secretary to pick up and transfer her to Sarah's office, where she was on her break.’
    • ‘Despite being in his office, the editor, Martin Newland, requested his secretary to say he was ‘unavailable for comment’.’
    • ‘There is no office secretary to answer calls or take messages, no student assistants to run errands.’
    • ‘If necessary, counsel may contact my secretary to arrange an appointment to speak to the issue of costs on this motion.’
    • ‘With that, he turned and walked out of his office, calling for his secretary to get her anything she needed, a drink or anything.’
    • ‘Englehardt explained that in fact plenty of people had seen it, and he sent his secretary to fetch some.’
    • ‘There is a story doing the rounds about a city lawyer who asked an office secretary to pay £4 towards his dry cleaning bill.’
    • ‘I entered the office, dumping the counseling folder on the secretary's desk.’
    • ‘He is even considerate enough to take time from his day to answer fan mail personally rather than getting a secretary to do it for him.’
    • ‘One guy a few years back asked me whether he should call back and make an appointment with my secretary to talk to me.’
    • ‘He pushed the door open and walked up to the secretary's desk.’
    • ‘After leaving the firm, I found out that people from my secretary to my CEO knew I was gay.’
    • ‘It didn't matter that Kyle had a newborn baby, or that Ryan drank too much, or that Tom was carrying on a secret affair with a secretary in the office.’
    • ‘She started in a law firm as the boss's secretary typing his letters and papers.’
    • ‘Since it was written in shorthand, he had to ask his secretary to interpret it.’
    • ‘She was then working as a secretary to Tambimuttu in that chaotic Poetry London office in Manchester Square.’
    • ‘Already a bunch of freshmen had lined up at the secretary's desk.’
    • ‘She is reportedly the lowest paid secretary in the department.’
    • ‘A former England player who roomed with him now has to call Hoddle's secretary to get an appointment to speak to him.’
    assistant, personal assistant, pa, administrator, clerk, clerical assistant, amanuensis, girl friday, man friday
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An official of a society or other organization who conducts its correspondence and keeps its records.
      ‘she was secretary of the Women's Labour League’
      • ‘This is borne out by a letter of April 11, from the solicitors to the area secretary of the Law society.’
      • ‘Well, he is the appointments secretary and administrator for all referees outside of the Football League.’
      • ‘The tuning of the City Hall organ is ongoing, and every night, the secretary of the Organ Society, David Smit, spends several hours tuning the instrument.’
      • ‘It was provided to the Foreign Office by the secretary to the World Jewish Council, who in turn had received it from a source in Berlin.’
      • ‘He was heavily involved in coaching and administration and was secretary to the national cycling association.’
    2. 1.2 The principal assistant of a UK government minister or ambassador.
      as title ‘Chief Secretary to the Treasury’
    3. 1.3 An official in charge of a US government department.
      • ‘Fillmore instructed his attorney general and the secretary of the Navy to arrest the king.’
      • ‘One priest was accredited as First Secretary at the Italian Embassy.’
      • ‘The 1986 legislation also specified the responsibilities of each service secretary to the defense secretary.’
      • ‘In 1992 former secretary to the office of Governor-General, Sir David Smith, wrote.’
      • ‘And Dr. Sue Bailey is a former assistant defense secretary for health affairs.’
      • ‘But in the meantime the education secretary announced £200m extra for university research.’
      • ‘Reminded that was not what the shadow health secretary had said, Boris preferred to keep digging.’
      • ‘The education secretary at the time, Kenneth Baker, was more moderate.’
      • ‘She immediately contacted the British secretary of war and volunteered her time and skills.’
      • ‘We need the president to go there and also tell the treasury secretary to certify that it's happening.’
      • ‘In London, shadow foreign secretary Michael Ancram said Buttiglione's withdrawal raised some disturbing issues.’
      • ‘I also tried to contact the Permanent Secretary in Bisho without success.’
      • ‘The Secretary of Commerce must consult with the Department of Justice before issuing such a certificate.’
      • ‘Yet the new treasury secretary nominee turned out not to be much of an improvement.’
      • ‘Michael Ancram, shadow foreign secretary, played down talk of a rift.’
      • ‘Returning from Europe in 1783, Jay served Congress as secretary for foreign affairs for the next six years.’
      • ‘He was provincial general secretary of Leon for 11 years.’
      • ‘Taft, a former deputy defence secretary under President Ronald Reagan, was the man to do that.’
      • ‘As secretary of commerce, Hoover himself drafted much of the legislation.’
      • ‘The secretary of agriculture already has gathered input on issues for the next bill.’
      • ‘In 1996, he became the sixth deputy assistant secretary of defense for Policy and Missions.’
      • ‘The British Home Secretary announced today that marijuana will be rescheduled as a Class C drug.’
      • ‘Wolfowitz is US deputy defence secretary and widely regarded as the chief intellectual architect of the Iraq war.’
      • ‘Perle is a commentator on defense issues and a former US assistant secretary of defense.’
      • ‘The Secretary of the Navy, Gordon England, has dismissed these allegations.’
      • ‘But there's a new Army secretary in charge.’

Origin

Late Middle English (originally in the sense ‘person entrusted with a secret’): from late Latin secretarius ‘confidential officer’, from Latin secretum ‘secret’, neuter of secretus (see secret).

Pronunciation

secretary

/ˈsɛkrɪt(ə)ri/