Definition of scullery in English:

scullery

noun

historical
  • A small kitchen or room at the back of a house used for washing dishes and other dirty household work.

    • ‘Of course being in the scullery is much better than being tied up.’
    • ‘I need to hear for myself why he was in the scullery that morning.’
    • ‘The flagged rear hall leads to a moderately sized kitchen, scullery and separate wine cellar with 18 arched storage bays.’
    • ‘But achieving this state of godliness was left to the servants whose main domain was the kitchen and scullery.’
    • ‘I suggest you introduce yourself and get into the scullery.’
    • ‘The cottage is entered through a scullery that has a window overlooking the back yard.’
    • ‘The property contains a living room, kitchen, scullery and a bathroom while three bedrooms and an attic conversion with Velux windows lie upstairs.’
    • ‘A huge fireplace dominates this unused room while a tiny scullery is packed with old appliances.’
    • ‘Cinderella-like, she works as a scullery maid by day, but dances with her master's son by night.’
    • ‘So when a dirty dish sends Valentine down to the scullery to fire the imperfect, immigrant maid responsible, he finds himself drawn into the seedier, more passionate side of the jazz age.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the department of a household concerned with kitchen utensils): from Old French escuelerie, from escuele ‘dish’, from Latin scutella ‘salver’, diminutive of scutra ‘wooden platter’.

Pronunciation

scullery

/ˈskʌl(ə)ri/