Definition of scoreline in English:

scoreline

noun

British
  • The number of points or goals scored in a match; the score.

    • ‘But, of course, when you can accumulate goals quite literally in bunches in matches that produce scorelines of 18-0 and 19-0 the total mounts up quickly.’
    • ‘The York club have argued that, according to league rules, scorelines in matches that go beyond 65 minutes should stand.’
    • ‘Some people have been quite shocked by some of the scorelines in the last few weeks but I haven't been surprised by any of the results in this league.’
    • ‘The scoreline was perhaps kind to us, as we ran away with the game in the second half, but we were good in both forwards and backs.’
    • ‘I know York went though a whole year of similarly bad scorelines but that's something we are going to get away from.’
    • ‘Choosing where and when to play with ambition, and respecting areas on the field, stages of the game and scorelines at which efficiency is more important than genius is the difference between schoolboy rugby and the league version.’
    • ‘Worcester had begun well and headed in to a 4-lead before two goals in the final seconds gave the scoreline some respectability from the point of view of the runners-up.’
    • ‘That said, a number of scorelines have shown that the gulf between the two National League divisions is not as great as some pundits believed at the start of the season.’
    • ‘He said: ‘Last season meant a lot to the Scarborough supporters and I think they were surprised with the results they got but, hopefully, we can reverse those scorelines.’’
    • ‘But their performances against Newcastle and Liverpool were much better than the scorelines suggest.’
    • ‘Bolivia, who lost their previous two games by 5-1 scorelines, added the third goal two minutes from time.’
    • ‘I for one will not be there to witness embarrassing scorelines on a regular basis.’
    • ‘Despite the resounding scoreline, Oxford will be concerned that for an hour they failed to convert their dominance in terms of possession and territory into goals.’
    • ‘They have shown steady progress in the League, finishing mid-table and with close scorelines in most games.’
    • ‘So many football matches were called off that the pools panel was invented, to deliberate on the scorelines of the abandoned games.’
    • ‘Controversy reigns, cards of both hues proliferate and crazy scorelines litter nearly half-a-century of Isthmian League rivalry.’
    • ‘From then - thanks to the stubbornness of the Queen's back line - the match seemed to fizzle out, and by the end the scoreline probably flattered the victors.’
    • ‘Solid efforts at all positions led to victories versus Guelph and York by identical 3-1 scorelines in the first and last games of the four game round-robin.’
    • ‘This was followed 10 minutes later with another try before the home side posted a late try to make the final scoreline 40-5.’
    • ‘I did not play at Workington last year, but yesterday's result was like the scorelines we were getting last season.’

Origin

1960s: extension of the original use denoting a line in a newspaper giving the score in a sports contest.

Pronunciation

scoreline

/ˈskɔːlʌɪn/