Definition of science in English:

science

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behaviour of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment:

    ‘the world of science and technology’
    • ‘She has co-written four books of hands-on science activities for children for the Exploratorium museum in San Francisco.’
    • ‘It is fair to say that this a priori account of science has found little favor after Hobbes's time.’
    • ‘It can't be directly observed or measured (except by me) and appears to play no causal role according to determinist science, so science denies it.’
    • ‘These are just a few of the things historians do when they study the past of science, technology and medicine.’
    • ‘A state-of-the-art DNA analysis system is opening a new world of study for science students at Muskingum.’
    • ‘It is a polemic because it sidesteps the criticism of science and its metaphysics by Hegel, Nietzsche and Heidegger.’
    • ‘The evolutionary perspective and this new dynamic practical science go hand in hand.’
    • ‘Emily's garden inspirations were also fueled by her high school science teacher and study hall supervisor.’
    • ‘Nor is there any reason for a historian of science to study philosophy of science.’
    • ‘Instead, we have found that our history fits the naturalistic world of science.’
    • ‘Call it the big book of activities for science geeks - it features 100 weird and wacky experiments.’
    • ‘McGill's timber studies developed within a utilitarian culture that expected science to produce practical results.’
    • ‘They could also translate that science into appropriate physical activity regimes for prevention and management of these conditions.’
    • ‘The second point is mostly for emphasis: science studies the natural world.’
    • ‘To this has been added a sustained critique of much that passes for science studies.’
    • ‘We should like to be able to translate science into logic and observation terms and set theory.’
    • ‘There was an affinity of intellectual structures of science with authoritarian politics.’
    • ‘He also combined the study of science with personal experience and philosophy like no poet before him.’
    • ‘Clearly science and empirical research is relevant to the study of ethics and to ethics research, but how exactly?’
    • ‘Join him for a discussion about how today's science affects tomorrow's water.’
    branch of knowledge, body of facts, body of information, body of knowledge, area of study, discipline, field
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A particular area of science:
      ‘veterinary science’
      [count noun] ‘the agricultural sciences’
      • ‘It's used in medical science and some other areas, too.’
      • ‘The new galleries, which are aimed at promoting Earth science to the general public, are immensely popular.’
      • ‘There his private income enabled him to take up the new science of geology.’
      • ‘The team members were chosen from among graduate students in computer science at the participating universities.’
      • ‘The book has lessons for the new field of ‘conservation medicine’ - veterinary science applied to wild populations.’
      • ‘How can basic cognitive science be translated into the classroom?’
      • ‘The next 20 promise even greater advances, particularly in the areas of materials science, computer aided manufacturing technology, and molecular biology.’
      • ‘By asking the people around him he learned that she studied and taught animal behavioral sciences at the university.’
      • ‘Nanotechnology is an emerging engineering field that borrows from such areas as materials science, engineering, chemistry, biology and physics.’
      • ‘What technology and infrastructural changes are needed to fundamentally advance environmental health science?’
      • ‘Others reflect that we cannot all be technically expert in areas such as bio-medical science.’
      • ‘Patients feel that modern medical science has become too commercial, almost to the point of being labeled as unethical.’
      • ‘The physical and social sciences are all taught in Saudi Arabian universities, which exist in all the main cities.’
      • ‘They will study modules such as chemical and physical forensic science, forensic psychology and criminal investigation procedures.’
      • ‘Perhaps the other area of psychological science most relevant to camps is behavioral psychology.’
      • ‘Natural science is quite advanced, particularly as applied in engineering and medicine.’
      • ‘And still she succeeded in advancing the cause of the science of genetics.’
      • ‘Modern social science has banished concepts of good and evil.’
      • ‘It is also an area requiring psychological science in order to serve the public interest.’
      • ‘By the mid 1970s, the computer industry and computer science were quite advanced.’
    2. 1.2 A systematically organized body of knowledge on a particular subject:
      ‘the science of criminology’
      • ‘Most importantly, the lists tend to omit the natural vitamin complexes and food-form minerals that are so important for our health, as demonstrated by a large body of published science.’
      • ‘We must educate our fellow educators and fellow scientists about the science of psychology.’
      • ‘I may defend my professional status by claiming ownership of an advanced body of knowledge or science.’
      • ‘We promote the science of psychology, and we rely on the foundation it provides for the practice of psychology.’
      • ‘But understanding the science of complexity is a far more useful metaphor than the traditional appeal to Newtonian physics.’
    3. 1.3archaic Knowledge of any kind:
      ‘his rare science and his practical skill’
      learning, erudition, education, scholarship, letters, schooling
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (denoting knowledge): from Old French, from Latin scientia, from scire know.

Pronunciation:

science

/ˈsʌɪəns/