Definition of schooner in English:

schooner

noun

  • 1A sailing ship with two or more masts, typically with the foremast smaller than the mainmast.

    • ‘Within a few years he was commanding a schooner with success, and in 1782 he was commissioned as a Lieutenant in command of the brig Endeavour, before being promoted to Commander in 1800.’
    • ‘The glimmering vessel was a great schooner, with multiple masts on top and impressive quarters inside.’
    • ‘Lighter vessels ranged upward from the cutter, a single-masted schooner with as little as one cannon on the open deck, or nothing but swivel guns mounted on her railings.’
    • ‘The California is represented on the marine railways next to a schooner, and both vessels are receiving fresh coats of paint by workmen.’
    • ‘Ships and schooners peacefully glide across the harbor.’
    • ‘Small sloops and schooners were particularly vulnerable to the attentions of privateers.’
    • ‘Until World War II, the America's Cup was sailed in enormous schooners and sloops, often more than 100 feet long, with dozens of crew and clouds of sail.’
    • ‘These brownstone schooners, or brownstoners, were shallow draft vessels that were towed by steamboat down the river to Long Island Sound where they set sail.’
    • ‘Next to the schooner is a brig used in foreign trade.’
    • ‘A lone sailboat, a single schooner, a solitary steamship might not have much impact in an eclectic gallery.’
    • ‘At that time, oil was filled in steel drums and taken by locomotives to the end of the jetty before being loaded on sloops and schooners.’
    • ‘Taking advantage of the prolific Bermuda Cedar, they set to work to design and build the Bermuda sloops and schooners that became internationally famous.’
    • ‘The majority of vessels were sloops and schooners of 50-100 tons, ideal for working cargoes from the shallow and confined havens of north Northumberland.’
    • ‘The maritime industries in all their variety, from building five-masted schooners to rowboats and all the related supporting trades, are represented.’
    • ‘As a side note, plans for a ship believed to be the schooner Enterprise were recently found in Venice.’
    • ‘Far from being an isolated port, one early nineteenth-century view of Monterey harbor shows a Russian brig, a Yankee schooner, and another ship at anchor.’
    • ‘The soldiers filling into the rowboats and low schooners looked out toward the stone dock and saw George Washington standing in his navy blue uniform supervising the last boats.’
    • ‘The visit of the barques, brigantines and schooners also seemed to drive off some of the tourism malaise created by a July shrouded in fog, damp and rain.’
    • ‘By 1920 about 95 percent of all halibut fishermen and an even higher percentage of the owners of halibut schooners were of Norwegian birth or descent.’
    • ‘It angled steeply downward, for the schooner's deck was much lower than the edge of the wharf, but heavy cross battens promised plenty of traction for those who had to use it.’
  • 2British A glass for drinking a large measure of sherry.

    • ‘They'd rather drink a schooner of fortified wine than be seen with a glass of something pink.’
    • ‘The branders and marketeers would like to bypass the image of refined sherry drinkers taking their apéritif from miniature schooners with the little finger slightly adrift of the glass.’
    1. 2.1North American, Australian, NZ A tall beer glass.
      • ‘He received a fitting farewell in front of his home crowd before enjoying a celebratory schooner in the family pub in Sydney's inner-west.’
      • ‘Most have done more physical damage to themselves in endless schooners.’
      • ‘If you want to talk to me some more about this, then I'm happy to do it over a beer, for it is the Australian way to solve the problems of the world over a schooner in the pub.’
      • ‘He took a slurp from his schooner and dug his fork into a chunk of fish.’
      • ‘I picked up the trophy with 28 points, and I certainly enjoyed the schooner!’
      • ‘There was a schooner for both of us if I had missed!’
      • ‘I am overcome by a mixture of terror, elation, anxiety and giggles, yet of all the days I have felt like a schooner of rum and coke and a cigarette with a double strength macchiato chaser, I have vowed not to compromise your living quarters.’
      • ‘The popular annual corn-on-the-cob day was played last Thursday in 40 degree heat and I reckon everyone who finished should have received a free schooner.’
      • ‘Painted on it was a red demon holding a schooner of beer.’
      • ‘A large part of the very great strength of DeLillo's work is the fact that beneath the martini chill of the writing's surface there is the lather and fizz of a schooner of old-style New York beer.’

Origin

Early 18th century: perhaps from dialect scun skim along, influenced by Dutch words beginning with sch-.

Pronunciation:

schooner

/ˈskuːnə/