Definition of schmaltz in English:

schmaltz

Pronunciation /ʃmɔːlts//ʃmalts/

noun

mass nouninformal
  • Excessive sentimentality, especially in music or films.

    ‘at the end of the film the audience are drowned in a sea of schmaltz’
    ‘romantic schmaltz’
    • ‘I barely get over one season of schmaltz, before I'm faced with another.’
    • ‘There's no denying how frustrating staid, riskless costume dramas can be, where substance is replaced with big budgets, fancy costumes and schmaltz.’
    • ‘The film then wavers between two principal downfalls: the misguided need for schmaltz and cheap laffs.’
    • ‘He gets a job crooning schmaltz in California nightclubs.’
    • ‘Unfortunately it succumbs to its meaner instincts in the second half, indulging in romantic schmaltz with the occasional inspired comic riff.’
    • ‘We wrote about three songs that were pretty schmaltz, the sort of thing that sounds like what happens when two people get together and want to write a song for someone else.’
    • ‘The two lead actors acquit themselves admirably in their roles, rescuing the film from descending into schmaltz.’
    • ‘And that's just sentimental schmaltz and keeps sort of slowing down the movie, when you want to see this crisp, involving action story.’
    • ‘First, it is not concerned with contemporary folk music, but a rather dubious brand of acoustic schmaltz that was popular back in the early 1960s.’
    • ‘But the fact is that by the last episode they'd resorted to cheap schmaltz.’
    • ‘If you're bored with Hollywood blockbusters and want a change from feel-good schmaltz, then I'd recommend this twisted family fairy tale.’
    • ‘It's schmaltz, and infuriating schmaltz at that.’
    • ‘I just get a little angry that Hanukkah doesn't have all that schmaltz.’
    • ‘Whether or not you find it heavenly, though, depends on your appetite for overly orchestrated synthesized schmaltz.’
    • ‘But even when these songs have heart-rending subject matter, there's usually something uplifting near the surface, delivered without schmaltz or gushing sentimentality.’
    • ‘This movie could so easily have descended into schmaltz and saccharine yet instead it is by turns dark, comedic, violent, enlightening, frighteningly real and ceaselessly inspiring and surprising.’
    • ‘The first violin, viola, and cello played the Viennesse chamber music section with warmth and stylish schmaltz.’
    • ‘There is a shift among the electorate to get rid of the sleaze, spin and schmaltz and to replace it with vision, trust and integrity, she claimed.’
    • ‘Christmas music ranges from the sublime to the stickiest schmaltz.’
    • ‘It can make you laugh without anyone falling over, and it can make you cry without resorting to laid-on-with-a-trowel schmaltz.’
    sentimentality, mawkishness, over-sentimentality, emotionalism, overemotionalism, sentimentalism
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s: from Yiddish shmaltz, from German Schmalz ‘dripping, lard’.

Pronunciation

schmaltz

/ʃmɔːlts//ʃmalts/