Definition of scenography in English:

scenography

noun

mass noun
  • 1The design and painting of theatrical scenery.

    • ‘The exhibition will also showcase the work of other designers highlighting the modern trends in international scenography for the theatre.’
    • ‘As well as offering courses in acting, the academy teaches scenography, stage management, and specialist technical matters.’
    • ‘The 43-year-old Ferranti took his architecture degree from Paris in 1985, specialising in theatre and scenography in the Baroque era.’
    • ‘This exhibition of some seventy works looks at the full range of artistic Bardolatry, and also examines theatrical production and scenography.’
    • ‘Every scene in a David Cronenberg film - particularly his set pieces - has a shape, and is meticulously based around a quite theatrical scenography.’
    1. 1.1 (in painting and drawing) the representation of objects in perspective.
      • ‘Another specialist in ephemera of this kind and scenography was Baccio del Bianco, whose extraordinary caricatures are an early form of the cartoon strip.’
      • ‘Within what is essentially an office building, Schultes has created sculptural scenography out of interstitial space.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French scénographie, or via Latin from Greek skēnographia ‘scene-painting’, from skēnē (see scene).

Pronunciation

scenography

/siːˈnɒɡrəfi/