Main definitions of scat in English

: scat1scat2scat3scat4

scat1

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • Go away; leave.

    ‘Scat! Leave me alone’
    • ‘There's no political favoritism here, so scat, you malicious muckrakers.’
    • ‘Vyk exclaimed stopping Darryn from his own question and then telling his driver to scat.’
    go away, depart, leave, take off, get out, get out of my sight
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: perhaps an abbreviation of scatter, or perhaps from the sound of a hiss (used to drive an animal away) + -cat.

Pronunciation:

scat

/skat/

Main definitions of scat in English

: scat1scat2scat3scat4

scat2

noun

  • [mass noun] Improvised jazz singing in which the voice is used in imitation of an instrument.

    [as modifier] ‘a scat rendition’
    ‘scat samples’
    • ‘Mel Collins' squawking sax combines with Boz Burrell's scat singing on ‘Peoria’ to produce the closest they ever got to funk.’
    • ‘He revealed a rougher side, first singing garbled scat vocals into his trumpet, and then using actual words, which was unexpected from an abstract act.’
    • ‘It's not a completely original approach - many songs have nonsensical lyrics or scat effects - but strong melodies like these deserve thoughtful lyrics.’
    • ‘The touchstone sound is hip hop, but Martin has dropped the rap for a jazz scat style which recalls British singer Cleveland Watkiss.’
    • ‘Armstrong's scat singing also influenced the singing technique of bebop innovator Dizzy Gillespie, who first began recording bebop in 1944 with saxophonist Charlie Parker.’
    • ‘Grant's definition indicates that scat singing, because it is not previously composed, is more directly connected to music than is vocalese.’
    • ‘Her first album was arranged by a son of Cuba's legendary scat singer and jazz trumpeter Bobby Carcasses.’
    • ‘Sharny is an accomplished and well-known jazz performer who has been singing on the Australian jazz scene since 1976, and she is renowned for her amazing scat singing.’
    • ‘Thus vocalese is distinctly different from scat singing both because it is arranged and composed rather than improvised, and because it relies on language rather than simply sound.’
    • ‘Instead of climbing back down to the seat with many grunts and exclamations, Philip stayed perched on the piano bench and started to sing scat.’
    • ‘The duo's scat lyrics and drum-n-bass delivery really temper the album, preventing it from becoming too soft at points.’
    • ‘In particular the album's opening few moments feature some fairly rank scat singing which had me jumping for the skip button.’
    • ‘While ‘Silent Night’ is executed in typical ho-hum fashion, Owen adds a delicious smattering of scat to a jazzed-up ‘God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen.’’
    • ‘In ‘Crootey Songo,’ Kaufman uses the techniques of scat singing to create a poem that relies heavily on sound and less on meaning.’
    • ‘Teal is an inventive scat singer; her handling of slow material has a smoky sensuality coupled with a full, luxurious sound that never loses its richness.’
    • ‘Debbie has one of those overly gospel voices that requires her to hit every other note in long scat successions before she finally lands on the one directly linked to the melody.’
    • ‘Discovered in Missouri, Shooby's musical style is imitating a trumpet in a bizarre improvised scat over a variety of music.’
    • ‘He exhibited his trademark stream-of-consciousness lyrics and scat singing during solos, proving he is as original and innovative as ever.’
    • ‘She was practically born backstage - her father is the respected Edinburgh scat singer Freddie King; her mother is a stage manager.’
    • ‘He was mainly influenced by sound poetry, and the scat vocals of Jazz.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Sing using the voice in imitation of an instrument.

    ‘she scats and harmonizes simultaneously’
    ‘some gentle scatting’
    • ‘Joao's extraordinary expressive range reached from guttural croaks to coloratura trilling, with scatting and vocalizing in between.’
    • ‘He was dancing in his chair and clapping and beating out rhythms in the air, singing and scatting and engaging in repartee with the performers.’
    • ‘Would Berry Gordy have allowed bizarre scatting on the outro of a tune, or have allowed a track like ‘Run Run Run’ on a 1967 Motown album?’
    • ‘This singer has a penchant for scatting and surprising material, but where he has an astonishingly pure voice, hers has more feeling.’
    • ‘Scatting in some West African language, and jiving across the stage, Redman showed he's the madiba of jazz.’
    • ‘A trademark 10-minute Booker T and the MGs-style funk jam closes the record, once some jazzy scatting is out of the way.’
    • ‘Jimmy's jazzing up the song, scatting and improvising - it's almost unrecognizable at times.’
    • ‘The topline acts were good, but I really enjoyed the black Brazilian woman scatting and singing jazz standards in fluent Finnish.’
    • ‘In doing so, he proves himself to be one of the more expressive singers around, free of melismatic acrobatics and, fortunately, scatting.’
    • ‘With perfect clarity and an enviable talent for scatting and freestyling, his vocal range has been described as ‘tremendous’.’
    • ‘Despite a little cool Latin scatting and standards-cruising, the mood is low-key - and the lost-love song Gloomy Sunday is terrifying.’
    • ‘Nelly is a startled-looking woman in a business suit who nervously takes the microphone and begins scatting.’
    • ‘The man in the video starts scatting, familiar and quaint at first but soon his voice starts evoking everything from Appalachian folk to an angel-dust fit.’
    • ‘As Sclavis and Collignon explore the first of several ecstatic improvised conversations, whirling folk dances turn into warp-speed vocal scatting against electronic echoes.’
    • ‘At any moment he's liable to surprise you with a riff on his trumpet or break out into spontaneous scatting, tapping his foot to a mental rhythm.’
    • ‘She was a jazz singer and good at scatting and that's where I got some of my voice improvisations in terms of how to carry my voice.’
    • ‘Nightworks is their debut album, redolent with thick house beats, whooshey keyboards, horns, saxes, scatting…’

Origin

1920s: probably imitative.

Pronunciation:

scat

/skat/

Main definitions of scat in English

: scat1scat2scat3scat4

scat3

noun

  • [mass noun] Droppings, especially those of carnivorous mammals.

    ‘fresh bear scat’
    [count noun] ‘samples of scats from otters’
    ‘wolf scats’
    • ‘But Bolgiano and other wildlife authorities are convinced from scat, tracks, and the occasional carcass that the cats are making a comeback.’
    • ‘A much higher proportion of weasel scats, of partially consumed rodents, and of weasels themselves in our boxes occur in the fencerow habitat than in forest or edge.’
    • ‘Territories are not defended but are vigorously marked with scat, urine, gland secretions, ground scrapes and ‘scratching post’ scrapes.’
    • ‘Animals can be identified by footprints, scat, sometimes scent, fur, and their habits.’
    • ‘This is their idea of a holiday and they've paid $1, 800 U.S. to scour these rocks for scat from raccoons, pygmy skunks, ocelots, coyotes and jaguars.’
    • ‘Using scat allows sample collection without disturbing the focal animal.’
    • ‘Every mile, it seemed, Bruscino had a story of a bear encounter, or we saw evidence of bear activity - branches torn from fruit trees, seed-larded scat.’
    • ‘Today they haven't had any luck, but tomorrow they'll continue to check for scats, tracks and traps so they can at least get a better understanding of Mexico's carnivores.’
    • ‘There were no paw prints and no fresh scat, nothing at all to indicate that a cougar had cubbed in these hills that summer.’
    • ‘From his work analyzing hormones and DNA in animal feces, Wasser knew that scat could provide a wealth of information about wildlife populations.’
    • ‘Sign surveys also were conducted throughout each session by searching for scats, tracks, feeding signs, and dens within and along the paths between trap stations.’
    • ‘Another approach that is likely to gain popularity in the future is individual identification using DNA extracted from tiger scats or hair.’
    • ‘Over several weeks, I collected carnivore scat similar to that I had seen gathered by waxbills and stored it in a freezer.’
    • ‘Other animals are known to use scat for surprising purposes; larval tortoise beetles pile fecal shields on their backs to protect them from predators.’
    • ‘There was otter scat on the bank, coyote tracks on the ice, and where the bridge had arched the flow in some lost age, a recently demolished beaver dam.’
    • ‘Mud crab exoskeletal remains were abundant in the scat of river otter of the upper Parker River estuary.’
    • ‘The wolves proved very clever and I was only able to see a few green shapes in a night scope and get some detailed pictures of scat and prints.’
    • ‘This is done by biologists to make sure they have the right scat from the right animal.’
    • ‘Bear signs are everywhere in Bradwell Bay, from fresh footprints to scat to mauled trees, marked by hears to show territorial boundaries.’
    • ‘Avoid bears by looking for their signs: fresh diggings, bear scats, tracks, and salmon carcasses.’

Origin

1950s: from Greek skōr, skat- dung.

Pronunciation:

scat

/skat/

Main definitions of scat in English

: scat1scat2scat3scat4

scat4

noun

  • A small deep-bodied silvery fish that lives in inshore and estuarine waters of the Indo-Pacific.

    argus

Origin

1960s: abbreviation of modern Latin Scatophagidae, from Greek skatophagos dung-eating (because the fish is often found beside sewage outlets).

Pronunciation:

scat

/skat/