Definition of satiric in English:

satiric

adjective

  • another term for satirical
    • ‘The strong undertone of moral earnestness, never preached, gives a stability and force to the vivid portraiture, and prevents the satiric touches from degenerating into mere malice.’
    • ‘This is like Shostakovich without his satiric, acerbic side.’
    • ‘It's not just his media-conscious satiric style that gives Edwards a contemporary quality.’
    • ‘It's not all bad, of course: much of Thackerey's satiric wit and observation manages to break through the smog of a lifeless interpretation.’
    • ‘It was also to be a vehicle for Dickens as an essayist, both as a fanciful observer and as an earnestly satiric social critic.’
    • ‘There are those rare exceptions, though, works of animation that are either visually stunning or serve to make some sort of satiric commentary.’
    • ‘It's filled with half-recognisable satiric dialogue.’
    • ‘Behind this lies a genuine satiric point about the booming heritage industry's dependence on quaint appellations and sentimental conservation.’
    • ‘Her narrative's self-conscious, satiric use of established forms illustrates how these forms in turn could be reconstructed for different ideological ends.’
    • ‘Although they had no satiric intent they were designed as a commentary on the emptiness of lives dominated by consumerism.’
    • ‘I'm not sure I fully understood the complete satiric meaning of your piece.’
    • ‘There are satiric songs mocking meanness and tyranny, songs in praise of drink and drinkers, while other pieces celebrate heroic feats of valour or of sport.’
    • ‘Another related discursive tendency is the use of satiric irony, especially sarcasm.’
    • ‘Rops's entire oeuvre is informed by a satiric and sardonic eye for the follies of the world.’
    • ‘A surreal, oddly sinister classic, this expertly mixes a cruel and satiric sense of humour with wide-eyed wonder.’
    • ‘The heart of the novel is a long, dazzling set piece that is simultaneously satiric and macabre.’
    • ‘Swift's disturbing satiric vision and eccentricities have given rise to countless myths and legends about his life.’
    • ‘The pieces are intelligently chosen, quirky and satiric extracts sharing space with atmospheric and journalistic ones, encouraging the reader to reconsider stereotypes.’
    • ‘Shakespeare has left us a satiric portrait of the poet who writes verses by the yard to please a patron in Timon of Athens.’
    • ‘Boyle's novels are wittily and slyly satiric about the earnest, innocent reforming utopians who questioned social attitudes and proselytised progressive, perfectionist ideals.’

Pronunciation

satiric

/səˈtɪrɪk/