Definition of sartorial in English:

sartorial

adjective

  • [attributive] Relating to tailoring, clothes, or style of dress:

    ‘sartorial elegance’
    • ‘She was conscious that many women would have seen such a sartorial disaster as comical.’
    • ‘A unique combination of tact, charm, deportment and sartorial style, he was all one would wish to see in an idol.’
    • ‘Do you know a businessman who turns heads as he strides the city's sidewalks in his perfectly tailored sartorial elegance?’
    • ‘I've dressed up a bit in deference to Evans's sartorial elegance.’
    • ‘The girls give their reactions to their fellow guests' sartorial style.’
    • ‘No wonder the Western world has been smitten by the sari, and every woman with a smidgen of sartorial savvy wants one.’
    • ‘Patients prefer doctors to dress in a semiformal style, but when accompanied by a smiling face it is even better, suggesting a friendly manner may be more important than sartorial style.’
    • ‘It flourished when a new, wide availability of industrially manufactured dress materials made possible a modern standard of sartorial uniformity.’
    • ‘Since there's little danger of hypothermia when the water temperature is 80 degrees, your chief sartorial concern is not offending other boaters.’
    • ‘Blackmore performs in a sartorial nightmare of clashing colours and incongruous items of clothing.’
    • ‘Indeed her presence influenced women at court to copy her sartorial style.’
    • ‘On Bastille Day, there would be a sartorial epidemic of clothes coloured red, white, and blue.’
    • ‘Despite the late-June heat - and the prospect of three hours of strenuous exercise-almost nobody had committed the sartorial faux pas of wearing short pants.’
    • ‘His plummy accent, polite demeanour and sartorial elegance remind one of an era when business was conducted at gentlemen's clubs over cigars and port.’
    • ‘His friends and colleagues will miss his humour, conscientiousness, and sartorial elegance.’
    • ‘In his prime he was very handsome, but dressed down as if he feared any sartorial display would distract from his teaching.’
    • ‘If you want to escape the sartorial stereotypes, you often have to pay a little more.’
    • ‘In the ensuing confusion, everyone in the room, king, nobles and commoners alike, ended up removing their hats, and the meeting continued on a note of sartorial equality.’
    • ‘I could afford to be superior about sartorial disasters I witnessed all around me.’
    • ‘Sporting sunglasses and a black sleeveless shirt, with his hair parted down the middle, he said he took his sartorial inspiration from Indian film star Tere-Naam after watching one of his movies.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from Latin sartor tailor (from sarcire to patch) + -ial.

Pronunciation:

sartorial

/sɑːˈtɔːrɪəl/