Main definitions of sardine in English

: sardine1sardine2

sardine1

noun

  • 1A young pilchard or other young or small herring-like fish.

    • ‘Among the other seafood dishes, we liked the silvery appetizer of pickled sardines and the house lobster chowder, which is peach-colored and stocked with bluefoot mushrooms and squares of smoky bacon.’
    • ‘However, if the diet is extremely rich in fish oils, for example, herring, mackerel, sardines and sprats, it may not be necessary to take hemp oil as well.’
    • ‘Dietary sources include eggs, fatty fish such as mackerel, sardines and tuna, vitamin D-fortified foods and vitamin D supplements.’
    • ‘Legered sea baits are proving effective with herring, mackerel, sardine and smelt all worth a try.’
    • ‘Omega three fatty acids are found in greatest amounts in fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, and whitefish.’
    • ‘These are the fatty acids in fish, like salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel.’
    • ‘Oily fish such as herring, kippers, mackerel, pilchards, salmon, sardines and trout, contain oils that can lessen the risk of thrombosis.’
    • ‘Opt for oily fish such as salmon, sardines, herring and mackerel; and on days that you don't have fish, take a fish oil supplement.’
    • ‘Sources of DHA include, salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and herring.’
    • ‘Salmon, tuna, swordfish, mackerel, sardines, anchovies pompano, bluefish - they're forgiving in the kitchen and big enough to take on some bigger beers.’
    • ‘Decent dietary sources of vitamin D to include in the diet include kippers, mackerel, sardines and salmon.’
    • ‘Salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, pilchards and fresh tuna are the best source of Omega 3 which is rich in Eicosapentaenoic acid.’
    • ‘Other commonly eaten seafoods include sardines, salmon, sole, sea bass, and hake, as well as eel, squid, octopus, and lamprey.’
    • ‘Ideal choices include wild salmon, albacore tuna, sardines, herring, and mackerel; these should come from waters that have relatively low mercury content.’
    • ‘Fish oil supplements are dietary supplements that contain oil from cold-water fish, such as mackerel, salmon, black cod, albacore tuna, sardines, and herring.’
    • ‘The healthy fats found in oily fish such as salmon, trout, mackerel, herring and sardines appear to help raise HDL levels.’
    • ‘Reducing the ponzu and sesame makes the sardines taste less like herring from Russ & Daughters.’
    • ‘Eating at least three servings a week of fish such as salmon, sardines, mackerel and tuna is a good start.’
    • ‘Fish high in EPA and DHA include salmon, mackerel, sardines, herring, anchovies, rainbow trout, bluefish and white albacore tuna canned in water.’
    • ‘After the first planting in the Sacramento, the California commissioners noted that, although there were no shad proper on the Pacific coast, native herring, sardine, and anchovy were of the same family.’
  • 2sardinesBritish treated as singular A children's game based on hide-and-seek, in which one child hides and the other children, as they find the hider, join him or her in the hiding place until just one child remains.

    • ‘Leah, Jeremy, Demi, and Wesley were playing a game of sardines, a variation of hide-and-seek, in the orchard.’
    • ‘Not much later the whole group played a gigantic game of sardines throughout the church.’
    • ‘Or discover where Mrs Blair likes to hide when she plays sardines?’
    • ‘We went to a stately home in Cheshire so they could have a holiday and, on the last night, we played sardines.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • Pack closely together.

    ‘we sardined our dismantled bikes into the boot’
    • ‘Though I'm sardined with card-carrying IFSA members, they're not much different.’
    • ‘With little thought for comfort or safety, he and the inventor of the bathysphere, sardined themselves into a five-foot-diameter steel ball, and had themselves lowered on a cable deep into the Atlantic Ocean.’
    • ‘Fast forward to Scarlett O'Hara clutching the bedpost as she was sardined into her stays.’
    • ‘It was wonderful to see so many people sardined into Garema Place, getting all passionate and shouty.’
    • ‘This news reaches me via a tall man in a fleece, whose long neck allows him to see over before people sardined against the barrier in front.’
    • ‘More often, the underground traffic jam gnarls, and her overcrowded car will be filled with grouchy commuters, sardined shoulder-to-shoulder, sweaty and cramped, for almost an hour.’
    • ‘My friends and I often complain about how Vancouver is filled with snobby cliques who have no time for strangers, but maybe that's a natural reaction for people sardined into a city with 550,000 others.’
    • ‘I can't imagine they could ever feel as sardined as the Empire State Building's platforms.’
    • ‘Without the usual record business hangers-on to chatter over the music, it was an intense experience being sardined with 200 earnest fans all trying to digest and memorise 90 minutes of new music.’
    • ‘On the way back, we were sardined between the copious amounts of solos in front of and behind us.’
    • ‘But from where I stood, 10 yards from the man himself, sardined among the thousands of voters who had relinquished their Saturday to listen to the ideas of their potential president, it was raw, it was real, and it was riveting.’
    • ‘The other two boys slouched against the wall, long legs dangling, looking incredibly crowded, broad shoulders nearly brushing, limbs and bodies crammed, cramped, sardined on the little bed.’
    • ‘He will squint at the Tories sardined into the benches opposite, put his thumb to his nose, wiggle his fingers and, with a schoolboy bray, say: ‘Na-na-na-na-naaa’.’
    • ‘I don't know where someone sardined on the 8:30 tube is supposed to put the three papers they're not reading.’
    • ‘We negotiated a ride with a well-connected local, sardined into the back of his jeep, and he drove us straight past every dusty roadblock with a grin and a wave.’

Phrases

  • packed like sardines

    • Crowded very close together, as sardines are in tins.

      • ‘Passengers are also being left at platforms or forced to stand, and packed like sardines because trains are not long enough, according to the rail group of Transport 2000's West Yorkshire branch which sent the letter.’
      • ‘Rare is the TV program or illustrated book about slavery that does not show a detailed, diagramlike top-down view of rows of slaves' bodies packed like sardines into a ship.’
      • ‘Looking at the roasting masses packed like sardines on the Mediterranean beaches in August, and comparing this to the serenity of the fjords and mountains, it is easy to believe the Victorians got it right.’
      • ‘Commuters are packed in buses like sardines and have no voice to air their grievances on not only overloading but also over-speeding as they are driven to their deaths and fatal injuries.’
      • ‘Though a total of 78 were charged with conspiracy only 57 appeared in the specially enlarged dock where they stood, packed like sardines for seven hours on the opening day of the trial.’
      • ‘They were brought in trucks, packed like sardines, without food and water to the city where dealers carried them upside down, squawking in anguish, to their shops to be slaughtered in front of other birds.’
      • ‘As I got older, packed like sardines, groups of us went in cars and vans to the Ritz Ballroom in Carlow and the Carlton in Kilkenny where the showbands were all the rage and we danced from 9’
      • ‘After being herded onto the railway station, hundreds of these Bangladeshis are thrown savagely into box compartments with luggage and food-grains, packed like sardines in a can.’
      • ‘News photographers, packed like sardines and hanging precariously in open top jeeps, riding ahead of the VVIP and trying to get a closer view of the person (read exclusive view), is a common sight.’
      • ‘Looking at the roasting masses packed like sardines on polluted Mediterranean beaches in August, and comparing this to the serenity of the fjords and mountains, one thinks that perhaps the Victorians got it right.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French, or from Latin sardina, from sarda, from Greek, probably from Sardō ‘Sardinia’.

Pronunciation

sardine

/sɑːˈdiːn/

Main definitions of sardine in English

: sardine1sardine2

sardine2

noun

  • another term for sardius
    • ‘The Sardine stone represented Benjamin, the youngest of the twelve sons of Jacob.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via late Latin from Greek sardinos, variant of sardios (see sardius).

Pronunciation

sardine

/ˈsɑːdʌɪn/