Definition of sarcasm in English:

sarcasm

noun

mass noun
  • The use of irony to mock or convey contempt.

    ‘she didn't like the note of sarcasm in his voice’
    • ‘We can only presume that the index does not account for such complex concepts as sarcasm and irony.’
    • ‘Whenever the band got some coverage in music bible the NME, it was packed with sarcasm and cheap jibes.’
    • ‘Watch out for scorn, sarcasm, ridicule and contempt and inappropriate humour.’
    • ‘Now is a time for cynics to drop their superior sneers, swap their sarcasm for a sleigh and listen to the Santa in their soul.’
    • ‘But sarcasm, whether or not it's the lowest form of wit, is an expression of weakness.’
    • ‘Through sarcasm and dark comedic intonation, he seeks to expose true dilemmas and issues.’
    • ‘Witty sarcasm is fun, but back it up with something if you want it to be taken seriously.’
    • ‘Her voice was dripping with sarcasm and, Cole noted with amusement, jealousy.’
    • ‘His tone held a hint of mockery and sarcasm when he addressed her as young lady.’
    • ‘Despite missing her lines on a number of occasions, she made up for it with fantastic sneers and sarcasm.’
    • ‘All right, we admit sarcasm isn't the nicest way to make a point, but you have to admit it's effective.’
    • ‘There was a tinge of sarcasm in his voice and I could sense a laughter somewhere in the background.’
    • ‘Her voice dripping with cynical sarcasm, she said she would have those words mounted and framed.’
    • ‘All sarcasm aside, the bottom line here is that the film just doesn't work.’
    • ‘From someone as sharp as Morrissey, blunt sarcasm is enormously disappointing.’
    • ‘His wit, sarcasm, and sense of irony are not always easy to distinguish from where he is sincere.’
    • ‘Although it looks like she is writing about the life she herself loves to lead, there is a certain amount of sarcasm in this book.’
    • ‘A mere two months ago every Friday was a virtual smorgasbord of sarcasm for me.’
    • ‘Karen is quite a character, a woman of humor, sarcasm and extreme estrogen.’
    • ‘There are jokes and smatterings of sarcasm and irony in Register stories but these aren't for you.’
    derision, mockery, ridicule, satire, irony, scorn, sneering, scoffing, gibing, taunting
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French sarcasme, or via late Latin from late Greek sarkasmos, from Greek sarkazein ‘tear flesh’, in late Greek ‘gnash the teeth, speak bitterly’ (from sarx, sark- ‘flesh’).

Pronunciation

sarcasm

/ˈsɑːkaz(ə)m/