Definition of Sancerre in English:



  • [mass noun] A light wine, typically white, produced in the part of France around Sancerre.

    • ‘The French, by contrast, prefer to concentrate on a wine's origin, which is why you won't find the words Sauvignon Blanc on a bottle of Sancerre or Pinot Noir on a bottle of Gevrey-Chambertin.’
    • ‘Yet, New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs are far from being Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume second fiddles.’
    • ‘Whilst they are yet to reach the heights of the finest Sancerre or Burgundy, New Zealand wines offer an attractively affordable alternative which can both entice and excite in equal measure.’
    • ‘There are moderately priced ones like Sancerre or Vouvray which are admirable but you can expect to pay up to a tenner a bottle.’
    • ‘It is a component of the dry white graves and the sweet sauternes of the Bordeaux region as well as being the grape of Sancerre and Pouilly in the Upper Loire Valley.’
    • ‘In France, it's the grape behind Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume.’
    • ‘The Meursault turned out be a Chablis, the Sancerre a Chenin Blanc from Vouvray, and what I thought was a Chardonnay turned out to be a Verdicchio from Italy.’
    • ‘We should count ourselves lucky as around the world, particularly in New Zealand, growers have shown that they too can produce the snappy, high-acid, thirst-quenching whites which Sancerre epitomises.’
    • ‘A big, juicy steak goes well with a big, juicy wine such as a Cabernet Sauvignon or a Shiraz, while a chicken dish is better with wine containing less tannin, such as a Valpolicella and Beaujolais or a white Sancerre.’
    • ‘In the white category, Peel has done very well with Sancerre, Austrian wines like dry Riesling and white Burgundy.’
    • ‘Chablis, Sancerre, Pinot Grigio and Orvieto are all light-bodied whites that make fine complements to oysters.’
    • ‘Bordeaux, Burgundy and champagne are generally over-priced, as are Sancerre, Chablis, Rioja, Barolo and almost anything from the United States.’
    • ‘Anyone, like me, with a penchant for the Loire's acidic, chalky, black ash coated goat's cheeses will know how perfect a partner these make to this region's finest white Sauvignon, Sancerre.’
    • ‘The marketing people have even coined a term for the people who can't get enough Sancerre, Pouilly-Fumé and Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.’
    • ‘The crottin de Chavignol salad special is classic bistro à vin, a melted ball of tangy goat cheese over a thatch of mesclun riddled with hazelnuts and accompanied, as it is in France, by a glass of flinty Sancerre.’
    • ‘A grassy Sancerre from a very reasonable wine list provided an admirable accompaniment.’
    • ‘Loire Valley wines like Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume are for many the place where Sauvignon Blanc reaches its zenith.’
    • ‘Judging by this one, you need to spend around nine quid to get a drinkable Sancerre; reducing the price below that means all you get is a Sauvignon Blanc with Sancerre on the label.’
    • ‘There are wines that have proven their computability with local cuisines over the centuries, wines such as Sancerre in the Loire, Rioja in Spain, Chianti in Tuscany, and the lighter wines of the French and Italian Riviera.’
    • ‘This will be followed by grilled scallops and prawns with a crab mash, a lightly flavoured cream curry sauce, topped with caviar and served with Sancerre, Haut de La Poussie, de Ladoucette 1999.’



/French sɑ̃sɛʀ//sɒ̃ˈsɛː/