Definition of rustic in English:

rustic

adjective

  • 1Relating to the countryside; rural.

    • ‘Finding plain speaking was not so unusual in the rustic heartland of those days.’
    • ‘The glances it gets on these rustic streets are more murderous than any it might garner from the fashionistas in Milan.’
    • ‘Unbelievable, though, there is a restaurant here, set in the woods, rustic and jolly, with a view and a children's plastic slide.’
    • ‘The rooms are modestly furnished and reflect the rustic charm of traditional Montenegro.’
    • ‘Unlike Paul Theroux in his travelogue, The Great Railway Bazaar, the reader does not have to board a train and look at endless stretches of secluded rustic regions.’
    • ‘The film starts quite well in the rustic village where Zishe is a humble blacksmith, the beloved son of devout Jewish parents.’
    • ‘Although much of the traditional agriculture of times past has disappeared - the village threshing floors are now broken and abandoned - there remains a feeling of rustic self-sufficiency.’
    • ‘Charcoal advocates like the smoky flavor and the risky rustic adventure of getting the fire just right.’
    • ‘Villagers were in their colourful headgear huddled together in a lurching truck on a rustic road.’
    • ‘The patriarch belongs to the rustic world of Juan Vicente Gomez, who ruled Venezuela from 1908 to 1935.’
    • ‘Tale, the city-dweller turns rustic, rattling on about the countryside.’
    • ‘According to Gujral, hearing Sharif's views in rustic Punjabi made the interaction quite memorable.’
    • ‘In Batopilas, try the rustic adobe Hotel Mary for about $10 per person.’
    • ‘Sonntag occasionally populated his landscapes with a lone land hunter, usually near his rustic log cabin.’
    • ‘Camp Verde is less than 20 miles from the rustic retreat outside Sedona where the fatal sweat lodge ceremony was held on Oct. 8.’
    • ‘As cyclists rode through the rustic towns that hug the route, spectators cheered, waved, and took snapshots.’
    • ‘Sheep graze, and cows gaze, over a bucolic, rustic world that their forebearers would recognize at once.’
    • ‘There were small wooden houses covered by snow, and everything looked so rustic.’
    • ‘The fireplace really suited the rustic cabin setting.’
    • ‘But the idea that it is all about helping rustic smallholders to keep making rare cheeses has very little to do with reality.’
    1. 1.1 Having a simplicity and charm that is considered typical of the countryside.
      ‘the unblemished charm of rustic life has been a perennial source of inspiration for the painter’
      ‘bare plaster walls and terracotta floor give a rustic feel’
      • ‘Having been to Costa Rica many times I still love this country with its friendly people and its rustic charm.’
      • ‘Knotty-pine wails, white tablecloths, and a sprinkling of artwork and Western memorabilia create a pleasingly rustic yet romantic ambience.’
      • ‘We didn't move to Spain to recover some rustic, romantic, agrarian life.’
      • ‘It's hard to credit it now, but there was a time within living memory when we tried to lure foreign tourists with romantic images of whitewashed cottages and rustic simplicity.’
      • ‘This old town Bristol sugar warehouse is warm and rustic but thankfully convincing too.’
      • ‘There are no surprises here: it's rustic Americana and country inflected ballads all the way.’
      • ‘The rustic country architecture and furnishings feel very south-of-France.’
      • ‘‘The furniture of any era should advocate a return to rustic simplicity in the face of creeping industrialisation,’ she opined.’
      • ‘And if you never thought that rustic, preppy and retro chic couldn't be combined, then you may not be ready for what the season has to offer.’
      • ‘The home that architect David Coleman designed isn't literally a series of outbuildings, but his plan captures that rustic spirit.’
      • ‘A stay in the renovated stables, just off the main building, completes the Wildean-era rustic romance.’
      • ‘The region - best known for its great fortified port wines and some rustic dry reds - appears to be undergoing a renaissance of sorts.’
      • ‘As a contrast to these rustic, earthy dishes, I'm giving you my creme fraiche mousse with pears poached in caramel and wine.’
      • ‘The idea for upscale rustic cuisine came to him in the most ideal of places - at Louie's Backyard looking out over the ocean in Key West.’
      • ‘Meursault is the most rustic, but is astoundingly complex in nearly all its forms.’
      • ‘The island's only true nudist retreat, it's also the most rustic.’
      • ‘The Inn offers rustic charm with all the modern conveniences.’
      • ‘Like all tiny-room experts, they know the benefits of volume, and they're serving up rustic Italian cuisine for a reason.’
      • ‘Attached to the rustic old country house hotel was a gallery and a deli where we bought a mid-morning feast of focaccia, Persian feta and relish.’
      • ‘Now entering its first full season, the Hidden Springs Ranch offers a unique experience that blends rustic charm with spa-caliber amenities.’
      • ‘A hard, pre-manufactured material, brick gives a rustic and casual feel to the space.’
      rural, country, countryside
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    2. 1.2 Lacking the sophistication of the city; backward and provincial.
      ‘you are a rustic halfwit’
      • ‘It did not matter to Amrita Pritam whether she was portraying a rustic woman or a sophisticated urbanite.’
      • ‘No avenue was provided for input from the majority of the users of these rustic but sanitary facilities - the tens of thousands of Lower Mainlanders who frequent them throughout the summer months.’
      • ‘Old stone foundations are visible in the winter, remnants of a time when life was rustic and full of hardship.’
      • ‘Instead it reminds us that men such as Dabney were hardly rustic provincials.’
      • ‘It amused her that he was so rustic and old fashioned.’
      • ‘Ever wonder why Bombayites find other cities pedestrian, rustic?’
      • ‘I pondered the delicious irony of it all - for all the money and sophistication, Napa still felt, well, rustic.’
      • ‘Colombia was a bit rustic but she was finally able to think of something besides the divorce.’
      • ‘She cannot help mentally comparing the handsome, strong and apparently sophisticated Pichandi to her rustic, overbearing husband.’
      • ‘This is a vast improvement on the old one, but a bit rustic compared to other new clubhouses.’
      • ‘The tug of war is still considered a rustic sport in the cities.’
      • ‘But for station hands, managers, support staff and their families, the lifestyle remains rustic and dangerous.’
      • ‘It was a more rustic and northern version of Detroit with escarpments of slag and iron ore.’
      • ‘In other poems Marvell describes youths both male and female, both rustic and sophisticated.’
      • ‘Rather than dismissing their culture and beliefs as rustic and backwards, she seeks to engage with them and understand their form, origin and nature.’
      unsophisticated, uncultured, unrefined, uncultivated, simple, plain, homely, artless, unassuming, guileless, naive, ingenuous
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  • 2Made in a plain and simple fashion.

    ‘rustic pottery’
    plain, simple, homely, unsophisticated, homespun
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    1. 2.1 Made of untrimmed branches or rough timber.
      ‘a rustic oak bench’
      • ‘The light sisal rug anchors the rustic tables, and the suedelike wall glaze in a caramel shade adds warmth to the knotty pine ceiling.’
      • ‘You can buy fantastic rustic style six foot fencing from B&Q cheap enough to encircle the whole garden.’
      • ‘They build flower boxes, make picture frames from knotholes, and create rustic benches and tables.’
      • ‘The lounge is big and homely, and there are rustic breakfast tables in the kitchen, with the option of eating outside in the lovely garden.’
      • ‘These treatments often accentuate the natural or rustic look of rough sawn lumber and allow the wood grain and surface texture to show through the finish.’
      • ‘The restaurant has rustic farm tables to share and makes fantastic omelets.’
      • ‘This large room has a rustic oak floor and pine-panelled ceilings.’
      • ‘Other species of wood used include birch, which is made into besom for brooms and horse jumps and oak for rustic furniture.’
      • ‘Steven's rustic trellises typically last three or four years before the poles decay, making replacement necessary.’
      • ‘The furniture has the rough rustic feel you can only get from hand crafting and is reminiscent of old Morocco.’
      • ‘One evening while Fahrquhar and his wife were sitting on a rustic bench near the entrance to his grounds, a gray-clad soldier rode up to the gate and asked for a drink of water.’
      • ‘The owners painted the ceiling off-white and applied a stain to the rustic beams to make them look like driftwood.’
      • ‘Give furniture a rustic look by finishing it in a distressed, aged way.’
      • ‘The rustic fence is composed mostly of bitter cherry saplings joined with wood screws.’
    2. 2.2 (of masonry) having a rough-hewn or roughened surface or deeply sunk joints.
      ‘a rustic bridge’
      • ‘However, producing these two rustic finishes creates minute fissures in the stone, thereby increasing its liquid absorption and its retention of dirt and pollutants.’
      • ‘A rustic stone wall lined the edge of the overlook.’
      • ‘There are no architectural features, with one exception of a roughcast rustic bridge in the left foreground.’
      • ‘Against a rustic stucco wall, water trickles out of scalloped bowls into a colorful blue fountain bedecked with blazing bougainvillea.’
      • ‘Inspired by a trip to England, Pat's son Brian built the gate pillars with salvaged bricks and concrete blocks, made rustic with patches of mortar.’
    3. 2.3 Denoting freely formed lettering, especially a relatively informal style of handwritten Roman capital letter.
      ‘rustic capitals were much easier to form’
      • ‘This is a baroque homage to Pablo Ferro that doesn't employ white, condensed, rustic lettering.’
      • ‘High-grade book scripts were angular square capitals suited to inscriptions and the chisel, more fluid rustic capitals, and rounded uncials suited to the pen.’

noun

  • 1derogatory An unsophisticated country person.

    ‘they paused to watch the rustics dance and carouse’
    • ‘But if you visualise Owen as one of those red-faced rustics going about his business with a straw in his mouth, you are well off track.’
    • ‘In Greece, rich aristocrats used gold and silver in life, while poor rustics used wooden vessels.’
    • ‘As Christian fundamentalism and consumerism subvert local cosmologies and converts castigate traditional practices as satanic or insult animist believers as rustics, few replace shrine objects.’
    • ‘The phrase puts me in mind of pub engravings, of rustics in waistcoats lying full-length in rowing boats, poking at ducks with long muskets.’
    • ‘Finster has often been presented by the mass media as a hillbilly rustic who was ‘discovered’ and promoted to stardom by a few well-placed figures in the art world.’
    • ‘Teniers's distance from the rustics he painted is illustrated by his canvas, in the Brussels Museum of Art, of his visit with his wife to a country fair on his estate, De Drij Toren.’
    • ‘He was thin and unusually refined for a self-educated New York rustic.’
    • ‘He has remained the affable rustic who enjoyed the company of old friends.’
    • ‘It ‘read’ like the old story - that the rustics could be placated by figures and facts, even if many of the facts were ‘projections’ and experience beyond this island.’
    • ‘I was reckless in my ways, dangerous and unpolished to the point of being branded a rustic.’
    • ‘Now he was like some Steven King rustic, issuing cryptic wisdom from the porch to a tourist who just wants directions to the hotel.’
    • ‘Associating contentment with modest circumstances, she visited poor rustics in order to ‘participate’ in their simplicity and tranquillity.’
    • ‘In recent weeks, our Government has been trying to distance itself from the horrendous costs of foot and mouth disease, preferring to present the ministry as an innocent victim of greedy rustics.’
    • ‘Won't the degenerate rustics of Sherston, so clearly in need of protection from themselves, go back to their ancient uncouth ways?’
    • ‘In his boyhood, the autobiographer is an unreconstructed rustic who might have stepped out of a pastoral elegy of Virgil or Theocritus.’
    • ‘The very nature of the urban renaissance in Bristol was to exclude rustics from participation rather than to transform them into citified wannabes.’
    • ‘We rubbed shoulders with the local rustics, but only shoulders.’
    • ‘Still the rustics were at a loss to explain why they continued to consume non-vegetarian food.’
    • ‘The project's field co-ordinators are no rustics.’
    • ‘As ever, viewers would have concurred that all change originated in the city and not from ‘tradition-bound, passive rustics.’’
    • ‘It also started a trend which saw the country as the mist-covered heather-clad mountains of home, peopled by well-meaning rustics.’
    countryman, countrywoman, peasant, daughter of the soil, son of the soil, country bumpkin, bumpkin, yokel, country cousin
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  • 2A small brownish European moth.

    • ‘Some of the greatest declines were suffered by autumn rustic (92 per cent since 1968), ghost moth (73 per cent), and white ermine (77 per cent).’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘rural’): from Latin rusticus, from rus ‘the country’.

Pronunciation

rustic

/ˈrʌstɪk/